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ATTEMPTED ASSASSINATION OF…

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ATTEMPTED ASSASSINATION OF THE PRESIDENT of the UNITED STATES. Mr. Garfield, the President of the United States, was shot at and severely wounded by one Charles Guiteau, a lawyer, of Chicago, in the terminus of the Baltimore Railway in Washington, at nine o'clock on Saturday morning. At first it was believed that the President could not survive many hours, and in the evening the medical report was that he was sink- ing rapidly. On Sunday, however, he rallied con- siderably, and good hopes were entertained of his recovery.—We condense the following particulars from The Times of Monday :— PHILADELPHIA, July 2, Morning. President Garfield, in Washington, went to the Baltimore and Potomac Railroad Station to take the Pennsylvania Railroad train for New York this morning, about half-past nine. Upon arriving at the station he was shot twice by a man described as a dis- charged Government employ6, who is insane. President Garfield was shot in the ladies' room of the railway station, immediately after entering the room arm-in-arm with Secretary Blaine, who, hearing two shots, rushed in the direction whence they came to arrest the would-be assassin. Before reaching him the Secretary returned to the President, who was pro- strated. Both shots took effect, one in the right shoulder, the other in the back, near the kidneys. The Surgeon-General, Dr. Bliss, and Dr. Purvis, the latter a coloured man, were quickly in attendance. They probed unsuccessfully for the balls, and then ordered the President to be conveyed to the White House. By this time the streets were thronged with excited crowds. Two companies of regular troops were ordered from their barracks to aid the police in preserving order. The shooting was done in the presence of about 50 ladies, who were awaiting the train. The pistol used was of the heavy calibre known as "California bull- dozer." The President was removed to the White House and made as comfortable as possible in his chamber, and all persons were excluded from the grounds. Immense crowds surrounded the enclosure, anxious to learn particulars. Great sympathy was expressed for the President, with threats of "lynch- ing the would.be assassin, who was taken to Wash- ington Gaol. Guiteau is in Washington Gaol, where by the Attorney-General instructions all access to him is for- bidden. A strong guard of troops and police surround the goal, threats having been made that the mob might attempt "lynching," though nothing of the kind has yet been indicated. The prisoner is thirty years old, 5ft. 5in. high, and is supposed to be of French descent. He weighs 1251b. Intense excitement prevails in all American cities, immense crewds surrounding the bulletin boards anxious for news. Guiteau before shooting the President prepared the following letter, which was taken from his pocket by the police:— "July 2. To the White House. The President's tragic death was a sad necessity, but it will unite the Republican party and save the Republic. Life is a flimsy dream, and it matters little when one goes. A human life is of small value. During the war thousands of brave boys went oown without a tear. I presume the President was a Christian, and that he will be happier in Paradise than here. It will be no worse for Mrs. Garfield, dear soul, to part with her husband this way than by natural death. He is liable to go at any time; anyway, I had no ill- will towards the President. His death was a political necessity. I am a lawyer, theologian, politician I am Stalwart of the Stalwarts I was with General Grant and the rest of our men in New York during the canvass. I am going to gaoL CHARLES GUITEAU." A similar letter was found in the street addressed to General Sherman. It read as follows:- I have just shot the President. I shot him several times as I wished him to go as easily as possible. His death was a political necessity. I am a lawyer, theologian,, politician I am Stalwart of the Stalwarts. I was with General Grant and the rest of our men in New York during the canvass. I am going to gaol. Please order out your troops and take possession of the gaol at once. CHARLES GUITEAU." The gaolers say that Guiteau during the past two weeks made visits to the gaol, but was not admitted. Vice-President Arthur left New York at midnight for Washington. Mrs. Garfield was brought from Long Branch to Washington by special train. The entire Cabinet remained at the White House throughout the night. Sir E. Thornton, the British Minister, with Mr. Victor Drummond, the Charge at the British Legation, on Saturday afternoon delivered to the Secretary of State in attendance upon the Pre- sident a telegram from Earl Granville, expressing the great concern of her Majesty's Government and a hope that the report that the President had sustained serious injury was not true. Subsequently Sir E, Thornton delivered a second telegram from Earl Granville, to the following effect:— The Queen desires that you will at once expressl the horrer with which she has learnt of the attempt upon the President's life, and her earnest hope for his recovery. Her Majesty wishes for full and immediate reports of his con- dition. The would-be assassin's full name is Charles Jule Guiteau. He freely gave his pistol and papers to the police when arrested. Answering questions, he said :— I am a native-born American, born in Illinois. I did this to save the Republican party. With Garfield out of the way, we can carry all the Northern States. With him in the way, we cannot carry a single one." He further said to the officer:- "You stick to me; have me put in a third story front at the gaol. General Sherman is coming down to take charge. Arthur and all these men are my friends. I'll have you made chief of police." Being asked whether anybody else was with him in the matter, he said:—"Not a living soul. I have contemplated this thing for the last two weeks." On reaching the gaol, Guiteau said he had been there last Saturday, and wanted them to let him look through. They declined, telling him to come on Monday. He wanted to see what kind of quarters he would have to occupy. The Government officials are making a searching investigation to discover whether anyone is in censpiracy with Guiteau, but while all sorts of rumours are afloat, no evidence implicating anyone has yet been disclosed. Guiteau left a package of papers addressed to the Washington Correspondent of the Chicago Inter-Ocean newspaper, which he said explained his motives. The authorities hold them, and will not make their con- tents public. The correspondent denies all knowledge of him. Guiteau seems to be a person of disordered mind and restless habits. He was at times a religious enthusiast. Last summer he turned his attention to politics, apparently hoping to gain preferment by making Republican speeches in New York. He was a frequent visitor at the White House, seeking interviews to urge his claims for office and frequently addressing notes to the Presideat expressing support for him in the quarrel with Conkling, and asking for an audience. While waiting for audiences which he never got he wrote many letters and also cards, till the clerks objected to his taking public stationery. He an- swered, "Do you know who I am? I am one of the men who made Garfield President." He intermitted his visits at the White House for one week till Friday night, when he was seen in a porch at the main entrance. On Saturday morning he came in a carriage to the railway station just before the President entered. He attracted attention by compelling the eeachman to gallop Ms horses along the street shouting to him "Faster, faster." His brother, John Guiteau, residing at Boston, says Charles was born at Freeport, Illinois, in 1841. He was a tractable boy. When a youth, he joined the' Oneida Community at ,New York, living there several yews, fottt Ipiy because be could not live up to the re. strictions of the comaMHiity. He left Oneida. about ten years ago, and studied law in Chicage. Guiteau's brother says he has seen little of him for the past twenty years, but has often heard from him. He had long considered him insane, and always expected that he would end his career in a lunatic asylum or meet a a werse fate. He does not believe he had any precon- ceived purpose to kill the President, but thinks that he took a sudden notion to do so. He had intense Republican views, but in politics he was too unreliable in every way for any one to have intrusted him with such an undertaking. Guiteau said on his way to the gaol that the Presi- dent's assassination was premeditated, and he went to Longbranch for the purpose of shooting him, but was there deterred by the enfeebled and saddened condition of Mrs. Garfield, which appealed so strongly to his sense of humanity, that he came back without carrying out his intention. WASHINGTON, July 3. The news agencies have never closed since the attempt, and all the papers throughout the country have been issuing special editions during the day, which were eagerly purchased by the excited people. Meetings were held in many towns yesterday evening to express abhorrence at yesterday's event. The greater portion of these meetings were held in the South, where the feeling of horror is very manifest All day long despatches have arrived from prominent men of all parties, anxiously inquiring after the state of the patient and expressing the hope that God will save the President's life. Prayers have been offered in the churches every- where to-day for President Garfield's safe recovery. The sports and pastimes arranged for the 4th of July have been countermanded in consequence d the Pre- sident's condition. The attempt upon the President's life is the sole topic of interest throughout the United States, and the sympathy and horror expressed are universal. From all sections, and notably from tle south, come despatches announcing the deep grief and in- dignation felt at the shooting of President Grarfield. In many places business was suspended on receipt of the intelligence, and intense anxiety prevais every- where as to the President's condition. The N;w York Stock Market declined sharply on the news leing re- ceived. Later on the market became less exited on the first favourable reports, but continued feverish up to the close. The prison officials where the would-be assassin Guiteau is confined say that since his arest the prisoner has conducted himself very quietly, making no demonstrations o any kind. He seems to have prepared a plan for his conduct in advance, and is evidently observing it strictly. It is considered that if Guiteau is mad, there is a considerable am)unt of method in his madness. The prisoner eviices no desire to enter into I conversation with thE prison officials. The records of the Pension Bureau show tlat two months ago Guiteau applied for a pension on the ground that he had been a soldier during tb Civil War. His papers are on the file in the Buretu, and bear the endorsement of the examining sirgeons stating that the applicant was insane.

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RECEPTION OF THE NEWS IN LONDON.

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EPITOME OF NEWS.