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(Dm: yonkit Covrisp0nl1e.it.

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(Dm: yonkit Covrisp0nl1e.it. [We deem it right to st&Se that we do not at all time Identify ourselves with o&: Correspondent's opinions. The Commons of England, in Parliament assembled) are engaged in very dull work just now, and according to a well-calculated estimate, are likely to be so engaged until about the 20th of the present month. Five days in the week the first order upon the notice- paper is "Land Law (Ireland) Bill—Committee." Every day of the Parliamentary week, Monday to Friday inclusive, is devoted to this gigantic measure. The principal share of the work devolves upon the Prime Minister, who is assisted by the Attorney- General for Ireland. Meeting at four o'clock on Mon- day afternoon the House aits for about ten hours on the stretch, and adjourns not much before two in the morning. It reassembles at two o'clock on Tuesday afternoon, goes on until seven, adjourns until nine and then goes on until between one and two. On Wednesday at noon it is again in Session, rising at six in the evening. Thursday is a repetition of Monday, and Friday is the counterpart of Tuesday. The respite of Saturday and the rest of Sunday must be grateful enough to all who are en- gaged in such protracted and monotonous labours. But inasmuch as there is an end to all things terrestrial, members of the House of Commons may console themselves that Committee on the Irish Land Bill will terminate at last. Mr. Gladstone has promised an early prorogation, and has actually men- tioned the first week in August as a possible date. After the exacting work of the long Session, wel- come enough will be the cry, Away to the woods, away J" Since the 6th of January, six months ago, has the legislative machine been in operation. It has gone on through a winter of Siberian severity, when the snow was piled mountains high in the streets, and when the river, upon one of whose banks the Houses of Parliament stand, was as firmly locked in the ice as though it had been the Neva. It has pur- sued its labours through the abnormally cold spring, and now is patiently plodding its way amid the torrid heats of July. The sun is so many hours above the horizon that there is but little real night. The twilight in the western sky has scarcely had time to fade away before the dim grey tinge of dawn is ob- servable in the east, telling of the approach of the i ? rising sun and of the beginning of another day of life and labour for the millions of London. The short night leaves the air but little time to cool; and not- w ithstanding all the appliances of science to the tem- perature of the House of Commons, the work must often be necessarily carried on in an enervating and exhausting atmosphere. The New York Press has been comparing the system of railway travelling adopted in the United States with the European plan, greatly to the ad- vantage of the former. They tell us that our mode of carriage building is antiquated, and that the idea of the first constructor appears simply to have been. to imitate as closely as possible the old stage coaches that were superseded. The American carriages are all of one class, and are in the shape of a long carriage with a series of open compartments on either side of a wooden roadway running the entire length of the train. In Europe, on the other hand, travellers are boxed up in carriages divided off into compartments and although tragedies are not of frequent occurrence, those which have been perpetrated show that the plan t f isolation is easily conducive to villany. In America the whole of the passengers in a train please themselves whether they saunter about it from end to end or loll upon the lounges but there they are, all together, under the eyes of the guards and conductors -and it is impossible for a single traveller to be locked in fifty miles with a madman or a murderer. Nor are the trains detained in America at wayside stations for the examination or collection of tickets all this is done during the progress of the journey. A remarkable feature of the Money Market of late has been the way in which Consols have gone above par. This is taken as an additional proof that money is going to be very cheap for some time to come, but it is regarded by many as having other meanings. The Consol market in which a rise has been noted, would probably be as lifeless as any other part of the Stock Exchange were it not that the time for the pay- ment of the dividends is at hand. Dividend period always brings with a reinvestment demand, and the market has been preparing to meet that by buying in anticipation. This is the actual and immediate cause of the advance in Consols, and the rise is helped by the extreme scarcity in stock. The price of Consols is primarily the estimate formed by the investing public of the national credit, and that estimate just now seems to be a high one. The Eton and Harrow Cricket Match on Lord's Ground speedily follows that between Oxford and Cambridge Universities, and on either occasion, or in. deed at any time when there is an important contest on, a visit to Lord's is well worth paying by any one who has a few hours of leisure, and wishes to see London life under a fashionable and aristocratic aspect. The lines of carriages three or four deep, and the manner of their appointments, silently tell an eloquent story of wealth and luxury. This year, as originally fixed, the second day of the Eton and Harrow match fell on the date subsequently selected for the Windsor Review, and as at the last spectacle of this kind in the royal demesne, the boys of these two public schools occupied reserved seats, the time of the cricket competition was altered so as to enable them to be at Windsor on a day when more than fifty thousand Volunteers were announced to pass before their Sovereign. Such a vast gathering of citizen soldiers has never before been brought together in the history of our country, and the arrangements for an annual fixture like a cricket match might well therefore be open to revision in the face of an event of such wide interest and importance. Meanwhile the Wimbledon meeting has again come round, and Volunteers are speculating on their fate npon the Common so far as the elements are concerned. After the camp is opened-on the very day of the Windsor review-will they be roasted under the rays of an Indian iun, as in 1868, or run the risk of being drowned, as in 1875 and 1879 ? The experiences of the marksmen who have regularly gone to Wim- bledon illustrate in a remarkable way the uncertain- ties of the English climate in a month when it is not unreasonable to expect something like settled weather. The July of 1868 brought them face to face with a sweltering heat which was not much exceeded at the equator, when the dried grass in the fields was set on fire by the sparks from passing railway engines, and when the scarlet shafts of sunlight struak people dead in the streets of London. That was one kind of July; in 1875, and again two years ago, there was one gf a very different description. Hill-side rivulets were converted into mountain torrents; meadows were turned into turbid lakes, the surface of which was swept by a chilling wind valleys presented the appearance of inland seas. At Wimbledon by day the Volunteers who prefer to take a prostrate aim did so at a cbst of being saturated through and through; at night they were frequently awakened by the water pouring into their tents, and bidding them arise from their peace- ful slumbers if they would escape drowning. Thus far the present year has presented no such extremes, and it is to be heped that, when the prizes are distri- buted to the successful competitors at the close of the meeting, the committee in charge of the arrangements may be congratulated on having carried through the Annual Rifle Competition to a successful issue. While the Law Courts in the Strand are progressing at a rate which enables the First Commissioner of Works to promise their completion by next Easter, a Parliamentary Committee has been inquiring into the practicability of removing the Mint from its present site to one upon the Thames Embankment, where, as it will be remembered, it was at one time proposed to place the Law Courts, Now that the plane trees on .either side of the Embankment are beginning to show some results for their ten years' growth, that splendid thoroughfare has become one of the hand- somest boulevards in Europe. A new Mint would, doubtless, have added to the architectural beauties of the t fare but upon the other hand the mephitic vapours from the chemicals employed ia the establishment wcsM not kare tended to jnprert ,bt atmosphere. At all events, the House af Commons' Committee unanimously decided against the project of remove. As illustrating the enormous value of land in London, it may be mentioned that the site alonOt would have cost a quarter of a million sterling. Ttus construction of the new building would have been carried eut at an estimated expense of JB150,000, with an additional £40,000 for machinery. The Committee have, however, decided that the existing Mint can be enlarged for all practical purposes at a moderate expenditure. The first quarter of the financial year showed an in- crease of nearly £ 146,000 in the national revenue as compared with the corresponding period of 1880. There were expectations of a somewhat better return, looking at the fact that the trade of the country is held to have considerably improved. Time was when the present Prime Minister, as Chancellor of the Exchequer, declared that the prosperity of the nation was increasing by leaps and bounds," but it appears that it must now be content with a. more moderate scale of progress. Another indication of the com- mercial condition of Great Britain will shortly be furnished by the announcements of the railway dividends. The half-yearly accounts are made up to the 30th June; and although the second six months are always the best for railway companies, the results of the first half will be vested with considerable interest, as showing the advance which has been made upon the opening six months of 1880. It will, of course, be borne in mind that this year the companies had to contend with the great snow storm of last January; and this would, to a considerable extent, account for a diminution in the amount of their receipts.

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