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ATTEMPTED ASSASSINATION OF…

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RECEPTION OF THE NEWS IN LONDON.

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EPITOME OF NEWS.

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EPITOME OF NEWS. BRITISH AND FOREIGN. Her Majesty has directed Mr. Sampson, the art is of the staff of the Illustrated News, to paint a picture of the Royal review at Windsor. Japanese Nonagenarians are to be minutely cate- chised respecting their early life and habits by the Govern- ment authorities, who intend to combine the information thus collected in a practical treatise on hygiene. The Reserve Squadron, under the command of the Duke of Edinburgh, reached Cronstadt on Saturday. A salute of 21 guns was fired by the squadron and answered by the forts. Mr. William Inman, the proprietor and manager of the Inman Line of steamers, died on Sunday morning at his residence, Upton Manor, near Birkenhead, at the age of fifty- six. Deceased was a magistrate for Cheshire, and at one time held a commission as captain in the Cheshire Volunteers. A great fire has occurred at Flushing. The ship- building establishment of the Scheldt Company has been almost entirely destroyed. The estimated loss is from three hundred to four hundred thousand guilders. In spite of a lavish consumption of ice in the venti- lating department, the temperature in the House of Com- mons on Tuesday evening (the Daily News says) stood at 75 deg. In the Ladies' Gallery it was 82 deg. Truth doubts whether the hard work is really telling on Mr. Gladstone. He has so wondrous an amount of intellectual energy that what would prostrate most men is to him but healthful exercise. When, the other day, he was laid up, and ordered by his medical advisers to remain in perfect quiet, his idea of rest was to take the new version of the New Testament and to collate it with the Greek." Inquests were held on Wednesday at Aldershot on the bodies of four men who died on Monday from the effects of their exposure to the sun during the evolutions of a field day. Several witnesses said the labours of the day were not unusually heavy. Verdicts were returned in the several cases—two being to the effect that death had resulted from heat and fatigue, one from heart disease, and the fourth from natural causes. The jury recommended an alteration of the time for holding reviews, when the rays of the sun were so excessively powerful. There were 2,486 births and 1,440 deaths registered in Lendon last week. Allowing for increase of population, the births exceeded by 18, and the deaths by 42, the average numbers in the corresponding week of the last ten years. The annual death-rate from all causes, which had been equal to 191 per 1,000 in each of the two preceding weeks, rose to 19 i. A town's meeting has been held at St. George's Hall, Liverpool, to pronounce upon the Sunday-closing Bill. The mayor presided. The Bishop of Liverpool moved a resolu- tion declaring that the sale of intoxicating liquors on Sun- day was a special source of intemperance, immorality, and crime, and demanded an immediate remedy. The resolu- tion was seconded by the Rev, Father Nugent, chaplain of Walton Gaol, and was carried by an overwhelming majority. It was also resolved to forward a petition to Parliament in favour of Sunday closing, although considerable objection was expressed to this course being taken. A petition, containing 6,000 signatures, was for- warded from Bristol to London on Tuesday for presentation to the House of Commons praying the House to conclude no commercial treaty with France until the public has had an opportunity of considering its provisions, and that under no circumstances shall any treaty be concluded without con- taining a stipulation enabling Great Britain to withdraw from the same after one year's notice. Press censorship in Japan seems as energetic as in Russia. Before any local journals are presented to the Mikado, who reads the newspapers most assiduously, all objectionable passages are carefully obliterated. The writ for the Parliamentary election for the Elgin Burghs was received on Tuesday morning. The nomi- nation is fixed for Wednesday, July 13, and the polling for Tuesday, the 19th. At Greenwich Royal Observatory on Monday the temperature rose to 148'9 in the sun and 901 in the shade. Such a reading in the shade is rare even in July. Attention is drawn by the Registrar-General to the fact that there were 62 deaths from small-pox in London last week. Eleven were of children under five years of a<»e 15 of persons aged between 5 and 20,14 between 20 and lo' and 12 aged upwards of 40. The number of small-pox patients in the Metropolitan Asylum Hospitals, which had declined from 1,644 to 1,578 in the preceding weeks, further declined to 1,408 on Saturday last. The Standard of Tuesday says Though Mr. Gladstone did not formally abandon the Bankruptcy Bill yesterday it is now well understood that it will be impossible to proceed with that measure this Session. Several of the mercantile members of the House are anxious that an effort should be made to pass it, but we believe the Government will not agree to prolong the Session for such a time as would be necessary for that purpose." At the close of Midhat Pasha's trial it is reported that he begged that his death might not be long delayed, adding, "lam weary of life in so unjust a world," and, turning to the audience, said, "I thank you for having assisted at my condemnation, and now have only to ask you to assist at my execution." It is expected in Constantinople that the sentence of death passed upon Midhat Pasha and the other prisoners wilJ be commuted to fifteen years' hard labour. Miss Rye started in the Sarmatian, with 63 little girls, on Saturday, for Canada, and hopes to receive a second party of children in the autumn. Application for admission of destitute little girls into the London Home may now be made to Miss Steel, Avenue House, Peckham Rye. On Monday a collision occurred on the railroad near Covington, Kentucky, by which seven persons were killed and twelve injured. Rooks are making large settlements in the Orkney Isles, where they were unknown until two years ago. Now scarcely a garden in Kirkwall possessing large trees is with- out its cawing colony. Lord Wenlock has just arrived from abroad suffer- ing from a singular accident. Whilst on a fishing expedi- tion in Norway and Sweden he suffered from a mosquito bite, for the relief of which he desired to apply ammonia. He was opening a bottle of this, when the fluid burst out and got into his eyes. Partial blindness and intense suffering followed, and instead of proceeding to Lapland, as he had intended, he has had to return home. A sad accident happened at Blackpool on Monday. A party of nine excursionists from East Lancashire went out for a sail. The sea was somewhat rough, and the waves were breaking into the boat. At the time for returning to shore the boat was capsized, and nine men and the boat- men were thrown into the sea. All were rescued but one young man, named Harrington, from Blackburn. The body was afterwards recovered. The Polyphemus, torpedo ram, recently launched at Chatham, is to be lighted by means of the "Brush" system of electric illumination. An inquest has been held at Athlone on the bodies of Sergeant-major James Mitchell, Mess-Sergeant Isaac Stewart, Sergeant John Cromley, master tailor, and Sergeant James Thompson, acting Sergeant-Major, all belonging to the 60th Rifles, who were drowned while on a boating excur- sion on Lough Rea on Saturday evening, and whose bodies were recovered on Sunday. On Wednesday afternoon a passenger train from Saltburn ran into a train of empty carriages at the Darling- ton Station, and the passengers were shaken and bruised, but not seriously. The cause of the accident was the break- ing of the rod fromjthelever guiding the points, on account of which the train was turned on to the wrong line. The empty carriages were quite telescoped and forced on to the platform, breaking some heavy iron rails. Fortunately that PM4 ot t&e station was empty at the time, On Tuesday a private in the 55th Regiment, named John Gibbons, was found dead near the Old Mills, Dover, having fallen over the cliff at the western heights. Another great fall of cliff has occurred on the Dorset coast, near Bridport, several thousand tons of the cliff having fallen. The Kroumir bonnet has appeared in Paris. It is large, and of a fiery hue. Intelligence from St. Petersburg says that a telegram from Volhynia Government reports that a large fire has occurred in the town of Rovno. Five thousand families have been suddenly thrown into complete destitution. The cathedral and all the public buildings are destroyed. The New York Produce Exchange Bulletin thinks every day gives proof of the fact that flour will soon super- sede wheat in the exports to Europe, South America, and, in particular, to China. It is estimated that sending flour across the Atlantic saves 30 per cent. in weight, and if this estimate is correct, the saving of freight alone must be con. siderable. The population of Bombay is upwards of 755,000, or 110,621 more than when the Census was taken in 1872. In point of population, Bombay is the second city in tha British Empire, Two bisons from North America were lately im- ported to Bombay but died in a few weeks, being unable to endure a tropical climate. A telegram was received on Tuesday at the Ad- miralty from Rear-Admiral the Earl of Clanwilliam, com- manding the detached squadron, dated Melbourne, July 5, reporting that there is no foundation whatever for the rumour circulated on Monday respecting an accident to either Prince Albert Edward or Prince George of Wales. The number of fourpenny bits in circulation is getting smaller by degrees and beautifully less" decipher- able; It is just twenty-five years since the last of these coins was turned out by the Mint authorities. No more will be issued. As against this some two millions of three- penny bits have been circulated within the last three years. Mr. Fawcett is contemplating a wise alteration with reference to the registration of letters. Under the present arrangements the maximum liability of the postal authorities for letters lost during transit is e2 he proposes to increase it from sums varying from 45 to £ 20, upon pay- ment of a twopenny registration fee. c?nstructing a canal between the North Sea and the Baltic, which firsf arose after the conclu- sion of the Danish war, is now again being considered by the Prussian Government. In the House of Commons, on Taesday, Mr.' Stevenson presented a petition in favour of Sunday closing which, he said, was signed by 84,283 persons, and was 1,100 yards in length. In New York the Brush Electric Light Company is erecting, at its own expense, a pole 150 feet high in Union and Madison squares, each to have on the top six lights of 6,000-candle power each, as an experiment in lighting the city from above. Three similar poles are to be put up in the lower part of Central Park. The Horseshoe Fall at Niagara is to be lighted up by forty electric lamps of eight thousand candle-power. The fall will make its own electricity, and it will be the first time it has done a useful stroke of business. A man who had been working in a field at Gretton, died on Tuesday from sunstroke. A fatal case of sunstroke occurred also at Rugby, and another at Betch worth, near Reigate-in the latter case the man having been play- ing at cricket when he had the stroke. Bradford wool fair was held on Tuesday in very fin weather. The attendance was fairly good, but the pitch was only 12,630 fleeces, being several thousand less than last year. Ihe prices were steadier than last week, the average being about 26s. a tod, and the highest 28s. The Duke of Bedford sent nearly 900 fleeces. The potato crop is said to be unusually good in the United States. The expenses of the Gloucester Election Commis sion amounted to £ 4,16118s., equal to a rate of 9d. in the pound. Lord Dalhousie, representing the Home Office, has presented to the House of Peers a Bill to regulate the hawk- ing of petroleum and other substances of a like nature. Up to Monday about £ 27,000 had been received at the Mansion House on account of the Metropolitan Hospital Sunday Fund. Information has been received at Lloyd's that the Harbour Light on Rocky Point, at the entrance to Harbour Breton, iortune Bay, Newfoundland, has been burnt down. Steps will be taken to replace it as soon as possible. An interesting testimonial to Mrs. Hayes for her maintenance of temperance principles during the period of her husband's Presidency has been presented by the women of Illinois. It consists of six volumes of autographs and prose, verse, and pencil sketches from politicians, authors. artists, poets, and officials of all kinds. The Crown Prince and Princess of Germany and suite arrived at Queenborough from Flushing at eight o clock on Wednesday morning. The flagship fired a Royal salute. A special train was in readiness at the Continental Pier, and shortly afterwards their Royal Highnesses left for Windsor, on a visit to her Majesty the Queen. The Daily News Correspondent, in a telegram from Chicago on Tuesday, says:To-day Griscom enters upon his thirty-sixth day. He is somewhat troubled with sickness and vertigo, but is cheerful and confident." The death-rate in New York for the six months just ended is 35 per 1,000 per annum. There have been 18,698 deaths, against 15,279 for the same period last year. Still they come—those questions. There were only 37 on the paper in the House of Commons last night [Mon- day], but 42 were asked without notice, and the total of 79 occupied an hour and ahalf.-Globe. The Calais tug Hercules arrived at the Admiralty wW.'iS?Vfr' morning with 150 Catholic priests, cS immediately for Canterbury, to visit the shrine of 8t. Thomas a Becket. A New York telegram says that the visible supply of wheat on July 1st was 16,400,000 bushels; ditto, Indian corn, 12,900,000 bushels. Export clearances of wheat tot Europe during the past week, 2,170,000 bushels export .clearances of Indian corn for Europe during the past week, 2,400,000 bushels. Last week's receipts of cotton at all United States ports „ have been 20,000 bales, and since 1st Septembee 5,633,000 bales.. Shipments to Great Britain, 24,000 bales, and to the Continent and Channel, 9,000 bales total 1st September, 4,272,000 bales. Stock at all ports, 358,000 bales. Malaria is said to be developing with alarming rapidity around New York. A generation ago malaria was as little dreaded about New York as it would be in London, but now some of the most beautiful suburbs of the city are becoming depopulated from this cause, and town after town hold a§Ue' which never aSain releases its TvrJ^"ern Mai8sty has approved the appointment of Major General Sir Frederick Roberts to be Commander in M,adra3 Army in the room of General Sin JN<evuie Chamberlain, who has vacated the appointment on the expiration of his period of service. General Roberts, who is to be granted local rank as Lieutenant General in the Army, will leave England in the course of the next few months to take up the duties of the appointment. At the meeting of the Irish Land League in Dublin announced!' SCrlptkms to the amount of £ 1,487 ^Vr1"-fArenen a-1Iy has iuat appeared in the field, t« help Mr. Gladstone in pressing forward the Land Bill Tha young grouse are reported to be both plentiful and strong on the wing this year and if that does not influence the Housa to make quick despatch with legislature, nothing wiLI Rome, it will be remembered, was saved by a goose per- haps it may be Mr. Gladstone's destiny to have equal cause for thankfulness to the grouse.-Glabe. The revenue returns of the colony of New South wales for the past quarter amount to £ 1,690,000, being an increase of £ 514,000 as compared with the same period of 1880. Ihe total increase for the half-year is £ 979.000, and for the twelve months ending June 30 £ 1,610,000. An inquest was held on Wednesday on the body of Catherine Connolly, a woman aged 60, who was killed on Tuesday by lightning while sitting in a ditch near Crumlin, county Dublin. Dr. Richard Hearne, medical officer of the district, deposed that he examined the body of the deceased. He found an incised wound, nearly an inch and a half deep, on the back of the head. It was a wound not caused by any instrument, but by a stroke of lightning. Her clothes were considerably torn and burnt. The jury found that she wag. killed by lightning. The compilation of the Clearing House returns from twenty of the principal cities in America shows the volume of business for the last week in June to have been in the aø- gregate fifty and nine-tenths greater than in the correspond- ing week of last year, and the amount for June greater than in any other month in the history of the country. The Liverpool Daily Post says that a few davs aim the Bishop of Liverpool received a threatening letter fsFZ an anonymous writer. The Mayor (Alderman W R v™ wood) has also been the recipient ofasinX cJmmnn^T tion, which is illustrated with a skull and crosl-bo^ tb ?:°^esde I'Am, a journal published at Bonn? has anneal11* n dePartment. says that a plague of rate seem to Innumerable swarms, which seem to come from t he direction of Lyons, have invaded many communes, doing great damage to the crops. Some tarmers, it is stated, have killed from five or JMY thousand rats in their fields in a single day. The Daily News publishes the following telegram from their New York Correspondent:—" Mr. Secretary Blaine, in response to my inquiry, telegraphs from Washing- ton You have my full authority for the statement that the visit of the President's private secretary to London had not the remotest connection with any phase of the Irish question His sole errand was to convey several millions of New United States Three-and-a-Half per Cents, to be exchanged in London for Fives and Sixes in the hands of foreign holders •" The total number of vessels which entered anrl lef#- the Mersey during the year ended June 30th Ws 20 with an aggregate tonnage of 7,893,948 tons aoainst 20 078 ton? K^hotTl incrf88* Th^crreifate receTntq nf paymS harbour rates only» by a reduction of rates at the beginning of the year. The Earl of Holine died suddenly on Monday after. an annointmpnV wm, ^stream. His Lordship had tance^from f-ho ?ne of his foresters at a spot some dis- mansion. As he did not appear at the ap- was fonnd l?^' searcl1 was made, and his Lordship's body to the hoixsi ^°n the 8round- xlle remains were conveyed pTHnnt ^ru' aid was summoned, but lite was 1 ',le late Earl, who was in his eighty-third vear and y Um,er Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs" ments d °ther positions UHder Conservative ^ver Science has just lost another distinguished renre« sentative in the person of M. Henry Sainte* Clai £ J>S who died in Paris on Friday in last week, after a Ions; illness, in his 64th year. His discoveries bore chiefly on mineralogy. He was a Professor of Chemistry at the Faculty and a member of several scientific societies both at home and abroad, and wrote many remarkable works. His name is chiefly known among the general public for the discoveries he made in the production of aluminium, thanks to which that metal was brought into use and became at once popular.