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ATTEMPTED ASSASSINATION OF…

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RECEPTION OF THE NEWS IN LONDON.

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RECEPTION OF THE NEWS IN LONDON. The news ef the attempted assassination reached London about four o'clock on Saturday afternoon, and created a pro- found sensation. At present an unusual number of American visitors are in the metropolis, and the moment the news was published in the brief form of the first telegrams the greatest excitement prevailed among the American colony. The Government offices, the American ration, the London offices of the New York Herald, and te American News Exchange in the Strand, were thronged IT anxious citizens of the United States inquiring for nws. The telegraph-office at Charing-cross was busily ojupied in the despatch of messages to Washington asking fftne latest details. For a considerable time after the B^S nad been otherwise received nothing was known offi- cUy on the subject at the United States Legation. Mr. {Tf/ arranged to leave town on a brief visit to Mr. i Arnold, and had actually left his residence, Iwndes-square for the purpose. But on his way to the idway station he found that the report was but too well stnenticated, and he telegraphed to his expectant host the ;h« postponement of his visit. Before the news i i e ^nlted States Minister, it had been officially peived from the British representative at Washington, by ie foreign Offle. The telegram, which was of the briefest jaracter, was forwarded to Lord Granville, and bv him a ipy was despatched to the Queen. The news reached her Majesty at Windsor late on Satur- IY afternoon. By the Queen's command Sir Henry Pon- ? J telegraphed Mr. Lowell as follows :—" July 2. lndsor Castle. 5.50 p.m.—The Queen has heard with the (epest concern the report of an attempt having been made ton the life of the. President, and sincerely trusts the imOurl3 of his having been hurt are untrue. Her Majesty ould be glad to learn any news you may be able to give this of course a reply was at once forwarded, giving ? Queen all the information then to hand. The following twam was subsequently despatched from Windsor Castle tihe Hon. Mr. Lowell:- Sir Henry Ponsonby, Windsor Castle, 10.5 p.m., July 3rd. T Queen would be glad to know the latest intelligence as t(he condition of President Garfield." efore the last telegram could be answered the following w received ° .Windsor Castte, H.30 a.m. The Queen to Mr. Lowell, XJtea States Minister. I am most anxious to hear the laPt accounts of the President, and wish my horror and de> sympathy to be conveyed to him and Mrs. Garfield." ) this Air. Lowell replied at. length, giving all the news henen had and expressing his deep sense of gratitude at tbnterest taken by her Majesty in the President's condi- tit moag the communications from Marlborough House the foiwmg was also received .K>0r0^h House. Pall-mall, S.W.— Lieut.-General frr<?byn presents his compliments to his Excel- States Minister, and is desired by the £ •»?»« » mcess °f Wales to express their Royal H*, m.0,st extreme regret at the dastardly attempt me on President Garfield's life. Their Royal Hignesses btthat his Excellency will kindly at once let Sir Dighton ♦ti?' .,their information what the latest accounts f i "resident's state; also that his Excellency will ]j|iy telegraph to Mrs. Garfield their Royal Highnesses' dEl concern at this cruel outrage. Sunday, July 3." alars"3 3 re^ wa8 a^° sen'> giving the latest par- i Sunday, at many of the London chapels and churches, that|empted assassination of President Garfield was ai^ed to in feeling terms. the Tabernacle Mr. Spurgeon offered a special supplica- ti<for the recovery of Mr. Garfield. The prayer alluded tohe people of the States as our own kindred, deserv- ia°ur good wishes and sympathy, and calling for our ut)st regard in respect to the melancholy event which had relltly happened, and which left in a precarious con- dun the head of the Government of this great land bflDd the sea. Were the wounded President still all-and this hope was entertained wherever the English linage was spoken-it was their most earnest prayer that w +v° oa imPr°ving, and be soon restored in perfect hfyn to tne great people to whom he belonged, and over WIn he had been called to govern. As a sister country we gtour sympathies across the Atlantic to the people of that ls,r?5e 80 ^any of our kith and kin dwell, and between ana us the bonds of everlasting union existed. the close of his sermon at the City Temple, Dr. Parker relhe following declaration "This congregation, assem- b^ a A v .°^ London, representing every shade of reli- *S° ical opinion, has heard with inexpressible ^tempted assassination of the President of tbimted States of America, and most profoundly sympa- th?;Jf „ Pe°Ple in this hour of national consternation a o v Dr" Farker said he thought they were bound t°8Ke some such declaration of feeling at so critical a jmure. He asked the congregation if they approved of tb l^ution to at once signify the same by rising to their fee ine congregation immediately rose en masse.

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EPITOME OF NEWS.