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HINTS TO INTENDING EMIGRANTS…

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HINTS TO INTENDING EMIGRANTS TO AUSTRALIA. The Correspondent of the Globe, writing from Melbourne, my— "It appears from the English papers that a large emigration of English farmers is to be expected, and Australia seems likely to get her share. I believe that to any farmer possessing even a moderate amount of capital Viotoria now offers a capital field for in. vestment. Numerous selectors, tempted by the liberality of our land laws, have been induced to take up land, and have held on to it for one or more years. But these are now finding out that, save in quite exceptional cases, it is the reverse of a paying speculation to take up land without capital. They had not, in many cases, the money wherewith te pur- chase implements, and in many more they lacked sufficient funds to enable them to live until their selections should begin to offer them some return. Consequently, never has there been a time when such farms have been easier to buy or to rent than at pre- sent, and a little capital will go a long way. Bat for domestic servants there is a better opening still, especially for competent female servants. The ordinary professional man's Australian establish- ment consists of three servants—a cook, a nurse, and a housemaid, who also officiates as parlourmaid. The washing is commonly given out, or in some cases done by the cook. That functionary receives from Jg40 to jE50 a year, all found. The other two receive J630 a year each at the very least. The cooking is generally of Spartan simplicity, and no culinary skill is evinced or expected. The factories have more attractions for free-born Australian girls than domestic service, and consequently servants are at a premium. They frequently change their situations, and as they are in much request as wives, it is not to be wondered atlthat a great dearth of domestics prevails in Victoria, They get much more freedom than in the old country indeed, holidays are almost too frequent here for the regular course of business, whether public or domestic. Grooms and butlers should not at present come out, nor are gardeners in great request. But steady and sober working men, who will be content to earn six shillings a day and to forego for some years any temptation to take up land, must succeed, and may eventually make fortunes. They are sure of plenty of good bread and meat, and indeed few of the necessaries of life are dearer here than in England. On the other hand, members of the classes above the working class should remember that we have a plethora of all kinds of clerks, schoolmasters, lawyers, and different kinds of brain-workers. If medical men seek to emigrate they should make up their mind to go up into the bush and avail themselves of the numerous posts which are continually becoming vacant there, in many cases on account of the previous occupant succumbing to the terrible temptation to drink—a temptation springing from the intense solitude and ennui attendant on a life so far removed from con- genial society and from exhilarating amusement. Sportsmen intending to favour Australia with a visit during our Exhibition time should bring a light breech* loader, as there are quantities of English hares and rabbits all over the colony, and the shooting is to be had for the asking. Moreover, the quail and snipe are frequently to be shot, and of all noble game the Aus- tralian snipe is the chief. Our winter has been un- usually dry, and the squatters are complaining of empty water holes."

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