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PROFESSOR MAX MULLER AT BIRMINGHAM.

OPENING OF FIRTH COLLEGE BY…

[No title]

THE FIGHT WITH THE UTE INDIANS.

THE EARTHQUAKE IN HUNGARY.

TERRIBLE ACCIDENT BY FIRE…

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MR. GLADSTONE INTERVIEWED.

[No title]

THE ACCIDENT ON THE MICHIGAN…

PEASANT PROPRIETORS IN IRELAND.

THE MASSACRE AT CABUL.

FREE TRADE M AMERICA.

ARTIFICIAL BREEDING OF FISH.

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ARTIFICIAL BREEDING OF FISH. The United States Fishery Commissioners are "going in" for artificial fish-breeding on a very large scale. In this country, operations of the kind have been re- stricted to the propagation of the salmoniote, whose eggs, being of considerable size, are easily manipu. lated, and, with Mr. Frank Buckland as the leader of the movement, some hundreds of thousands of young salmon and trout are annually hatched from the egg, in special incubating apparatus, at the different breeding establishments in England and Scotland. In America, however-in Canada as well as the United States—the eggs so treated and the fry so hatched and turned into the rivers and lakes are reckoned by scores of millions and, not content with stocking various waters with salmon and trout by this means, the authorities are turning their attention with equal success to other fish, both sea and fresh water. In the last three or four years many million shad and whitefish" have been reared in the hatch- ing ponds of the Dominion and States' Governments. By this means the Sacramento, the Mississipi, and other rivers of the Western States, where the shad was formerly unknown, are being stocked with it, and the range of the whitafish has been extended and its numbers increased. Professor Baird, of the United States' Commission of Fisheries is now taking a still larger step in advance of all other countries. He is havirg constructed a steam vessel, specially fitted for hatching the eggs of sea-fish, which will be stationed on the New England coasts, and which will serve at the same time as a fishing vessel, a laboratory, an observatory, and a breeding-house. By means of this vessel the eggs of the fish can be transferred direct from the fish themselves, immediately after capture, to the hatch. ing troughs, where they will be supplied with water from the natural spawning place of the fish, and whence the fry can be transferred directly to the sea when they have reached the proper age and siae. Already between ten and twelve million young cod, hatched in breeding houses on the shore, have been turned into the sea, and the reproduction of herrings from the egg has also been accomplished successfully on shore, to a limited extent. But the breeding ship is constructed to produce from five hundred million to a thousand million fry every season; the eggs, not only of cod, but of mackerel, herrings, and turbot are to be treated artificially, and it is even hoped that oysters may be reared in the same way on board the ship. There, at any rate, the means will exist of keeping the water artificially at the proper tem. perature.—Globe.

THE LATE CONSUL HOPKINS.

SCIENTIFIC AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION.

DINING EN ROUTE.

A HOG-SCRAPING MACHINE.

■ & The FOREIGN COAL and IRON…