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PROFESSOR MAX MULLER AT BIRMINGHAM.

OPENING OF FIRTH COLLEGE BY…

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THE FIGHT WITH THE UTE INDIANS.

THE EARTHQUAKE IN HUNGARY.

TERRIBLE ACCIDENT BY FIRE…

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MR. GLADSTONE INTERVIEWED.

[No title]

THE ACCIDENT ON THE MICHIGAN…

PEASANT PROPRIETORS IN IRELAND.

THE MASSACRE AT CABUL.

FREE TRADE M AMERICA.

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FREE TRADE M AMERICA. The Times of Thursday published the following letter on the above IUbject Sir,-In regard to the question of free trade in the United States, will you allow an American to say a word ? You have so completely answered the errors of your Philadelphia correspondent that little is left to be said in further correction, Your correspondent is right in Baying that free trade, as such, is not likely to be adopted soon in that country but he is wrong if he means to be understood that important modifica- tions of the tariff will not at an early date be made. Congress will, in my opinion, very soon reduce the existing rate of duty upon imported merchandise, in compliance with the prevailing I entiment. The Secretary of the Treasury in his annual report of 1878 recommended a reduction, and he is the prin- cipal representative in the Government of the Republican party, which your correspondent intimates will prevent this needed reform. Outside of those who are directly interested as manufacturers the policy of protection has few advocates, but where per- sonal intereat affects the judgment, as in this case, of course, Democrats and Republicans approve that which is advantageous to themselves. I fear that your correspondent is unconsciously influenced by the sentiment of Pennsylvania, where he resides, which is so strongly manufacturing, and, consequently, in avour of protection. Free trade in the United States is understood to mean the abolition of all duties which would throw upon all the domestic industries the sole burden of taxation, This would not be popular. Until the late civil war, all the revenues were raised by duties on importations. Internal taxes are not readily ac- quiesced in and are difficult to collect. Therefore, while, no doubt, our tariff will be continued, it is safe to predict that the rates will be so modified as to re- duce it to that standard which will produce the most revenue. I am aware that one of the two political parties in the United States has sought to obtain the vote of the manufacturers by advocating the continuance of the present tariff, and in the districts where th >se interests prevail this scheme has been successful; but in the agricultural and trading districts, which com- prise four-fifths of the whole population, an opposite policy has been adopted. It is a mistake to assume that protection is a doctrine universally acquiesced in by the Republican party of the United States. The leading Republican newspapers are opposed to it, and the last Republican State Convention of Minnesota advocated a tariff for revenue only. In the Western States, where the balance of political power now exists, protection has little or no support, for the sig- nificant reason that the population is mainly agricul- tural and but little manufacturing. It is estimated that the census now being taken in the United States will show an aggregate population of nearly 50,000,000, of which less than 5,000,000 is employed in manufacturing. It is obvious that 45,000,000 people, so jealous of individual rights as Americans are apt to be, will not consent to be taxed for the benefit of 5,000,000. Further comment upon upon this pregnant fact is unnecessary. You are quite right, therefore, in predicting a reform in our tariff regulations. FERNANDO WOOD, M.C. Cavendish Hotel, Oct. 22.

ARTIFICIAL BREEDING OF FISH.

THE LATE CONSUL HOPKINS.

SCIENTIFIC AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION.

DINING EN ROUTE.

A HOG-SCRAPING MACHINE.

■ & The FOREIGN COAL and IRON…