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PROFESSOR MAX MULLER AT BIRMINGHAM.

OPENING OF FIRTH COLLEGE BY…

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THE FIGHT WITH THE UTE INDIANS.

THE EARTHQUAKE IN HUNGARY.

TERRIBLE ACCIDENT BY FIRE…

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MR. GLADSTONE INTERVIEWED.

[No title]

THE ACCIDENT ON THE MICHIGAN…

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THE ACCIDENT ON THE MICHIGAN CENTRAL RAILROAD. The details of the shocking catastrophe on the Michigan Central Railroad have been received by the American papers. The accident occurred at about one o'clock on the morning of the 10th, close to Jackson Junction. The Pacific express trsao, bomad west, which left Detroit 40 minutes late, came into collision with a switch engine on the main track, tele- scoping the baggage and express cars and piling the remaining coaches, 11 in number, on the top of each other. The first coach was filled with emigrants, most of whom were killed or seriously injured. Many occupants of the other coaches were also killed or Injured. The scene after the collision was terrible, ana the darkness of the night increased tike terrors of the situation. Among the debris lay a heap 01 bruised, bleeding, and dying human beings, whose moans and -criee of distress filled the air. Mutilated bodies of the -dead could he seen among the ruins of the wrecked coaches. Under the shapeless mass which was once the engine of the express were the bodies of the engi- neer and fireman, which were extricated as soon as possible. Death to them and many other victims must have keen oastantaneous. The engineer and fire. man of the switch engine, seeing their peril in time, leaped from their places and escaped injury. It is -supposed there were about twenty or twenty-five pas- sengers killed, and from twenty to thirty wounded, the majority of them being emigrants and second class passengers. Physicians were at once summoned from Jackson, and a special train carrying physicians left Detroit at five a.m. A force of the employls of the railroad company, together with a large number of the ■citizens of Jackson, immediately Bet to work to extri- cate the bodies from tfce wreck. Up to noon eighteen bodies had been taken from the wreck, ten of which, taken from the emigrant car, had not been identified. Many trying and touching scenes occurred, and many acts of heroism were recorded. William Murchie, of Unverness, Canada, was in the first coach, on the second seat from the front of the car. There were about a dozen women in the coach, and he helped them to get out before he realized the extent of the smash-up. Mrs. R. J. Warren, of Ganges, Allegan County, with her son, who is thirteen years old, was in the second coach. She was on her way home from the State of New York, where she had been visiting for several weeks. They occupied seats on the Bide of the coach that was so badly smashed, the boy lying asleep on the seat in front of his mother. When she heard the crash and saw the side of the car come crushing in towards her, she involuntarily leaned over towards her sleeping boy, and in this position she was held until extricated. Her shoulders and back were con- siderably bruised, but the injuries are not of a serious nature. The saddest case which came under observa- tion was that of Willie Rice, a fair-haired and bright- eyed little boy, four years of age, whose father and mother and sister were all killed. He was found clasped in his dead mother's arm, and so fastened in the wreck that it took three hours to extricate him. His left leg waa broken, and his left arm and his chin badly cut. His family lived in Philadelphia, and were on their way to some point in the West. Mrs. George A. Jones, of Chalado, Pa., was on her way to Nebraska to join her husband. She had with her her family, consisting of five children. Of these a little girl, 18 months old, was killed instantly, and the mother never saw it after the accident. One of the other children sustained a slight contusion on the head. Mr. S. M. Sparklin, of Philadelphia, thought hi) wife and children, aged four and six years, were among the dead, but their bodies had not been found. The track where the accident occurred passes through a somewhat deep cut, and the road was of course, completely blockaded. The morning eastward express was obliged to cross over the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern Railroad, and reached Detroit, viA Monroe, many hours late. One of the most miraculous facts in connexion with the accident was that none in the sleeping cars were in the least injured while it seems impossible that such a collision could occur without resulting in general ruin to the entire train. The accident was caused by the switchman having charge of making up the freight train at Jackson Junction, who occupied the main track with a switch engine and caboose, understanding that the Pacific express was considerably behind time. The express, however, had made up nearly all the lost time. The officials of the railroad held ani nquiry on the spot on the evening after the occurrence, and it appeared that the men engaged in making up a freight train at the east end of the yard went to the telegraph office at the junction and got information that the Pacific express was nearly fifty minutes late. The yard master re- ported to the engineer of the switch engine that they bad forty-five minutes of the Pacific's time in which to make UD the freight train, and it was on this work they were engaged when the collision occurred.

PEASANT PROPRIETORS IN IRELAND.

THE MASSACRE AT CABUL.

FREE TRADE M AMERICA.

ARTIFICIAL BREEDING OF FISH.

THE LATE CONSUL HOPKINS.

SCIENTIFIC AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION.

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■ & The FOREIGN COAL and IRON…