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CETYWAYO AS A CAPTIVE.

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AN UNEXPECTED ENEMY.

A ZULU ACCOUNT OF THE BATTLE…

THE REVIVAL OF TRADE IN AMERICA.

A FORMIDABLE WAR SHIP.

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MR. CROSS ON THE POLICY OF…

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THE CORN TRADE.

THE POSTAGE OF THE WORLD.

CINCHONA CULTIVATION IN CEYLON.

THE METEOROLOGICAL REPORTS.

PROPOSED MONUMENT TO CAPTAIN…

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CO-OPERATION AMONG WORKING…

NATIONAL THRIFT.

INFORMATION ABOUT TIMBUCTOO.

A STATUE TO JOSEPH MARIE JACQUARD.

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INDIAN GRAVES IN AMERICA.

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INDIAN GRAVES IN AMERICA. An extensive burial-ground of the Lenni Lenape or Delaware Indians has recently been examined by one of the scientific societies of Pennsylvania. The cemetery waa located on the north bank of the his. totical Brandywine Creek, on a prominence over* looking the valley. About twenty graves were opened with the following results The skeletons were stretched at full length with the heads towards the east. The depth of the graves was about three feet. Associated with the bodies were quantities of Venetian beads of various sizes, shapes, and colours, and a number of objects of Indian workmanship, such as arrow heads and bead ornaments of stone. In two of the graves were found several antique clay pipes of considerable interest, with the initials R. T." stamped in the bowls. In the beginning and middle of the 17th cen- tury pipes were made by various makers in the vicinity of Bath, England. Among these was one Richard Tyler, and the initials R. T. in all probability were impressed at his manufactory. An approximate date can, therefore, be assigned to these objects with some degree of certainty. The earlier British pipes, some- times called elfin or fairy pipes, and by some anti- ^U*?es attributed to the Romans, made, however, in the reign of Queen Elizabsth, frequently possessed the initials of the makers' names on the bases of the flat spurs which characterised them. These were gradually superseded by pipes with elongated bowls. in which the spurs or heels were pointed or entirely absent. The more recent English pipes of the last century or thereabouts had the names of their makers stamped on the stems. The examples referred to are of the elongated pattern, minus the heel, with the initials stamped on the bowls. The stems have been broken off about six inches from the bowls, having been originally longer. They were taken to America by the early settlers and traded to the Indians. These graves, while only perhaps a century or so ia age, are particularly valuable to the student of American ethnology as producing skeletons of the tribe inhabiting the valley of the Delaware River at the time of the settlement of the States. Such re* mains have been exceedingly rare in Pennsylvania. and no graves have as yet been opened which did not produce objects of European introduction. At an early day the society will push their re- searches further, when other interesting facts will M* doubtedly be brought to light.

THIRTY PERSONS POISONED.

RAILWAY DISASTER IN AMERICA.

CUTTINGS FROM AMERICAN PAPERSI

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