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CETYWAYO AS A CAPTIVE.

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AN UNEXPECTED ENEMY.

A ZULU ACCOUNT OF THE BATTLE…

THE REVIVAL OF TRADE IN AMERICA.

A FORMIDABLE WAR SHIP.

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MR. CROSS ON THE POLICY OF…

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THE CORN TRADE.

THE POSTAGE OF THE WORLD.

CINCHONA CULTIVATION IN CEYLON.

THE METEOROLOGICAL REPORTS.

PROPOSED MONUMENT TO CAPTAIN…

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CO-OPERATION AMONG WORKING…

NATIONAL THRIFT.

INFORMATION ABOUT TIMBUCTOO.

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INFORMATION ABOUT TIMBUCTOO. The Oran (Algeria) Geographical Society has been fortunate enough to catch an Israelite Rubbi of Morocco on his way to Paris from Timbuctoo, who has already twice traversed Central Africa. By means of questioning, a Commission of the Society were able to extract some interesting information from the Rabbi as to the present condition of Timbuctoo, about which existing information is vague. Tim- buctoo, the Rabbi told them, is an Arab town in every sense of the term, built absolutely like all those of the interior. The inhabitants are Foulah negroes, and there are no whites. There are, however, some- times Jews from North Africa, who come to trade, but they never settle there. The town is about an hour's distance to the north of the Niger. Its population is about 50,000; it is larger than Oran (about six miles round), but not so large as Marseilles. The town ia, in fact, a mata of villages, extending over a very considerable area. The Niger which passes to the south of the town, flows from the west to the south- east, and is very broad there is abundanoe of fish. Navigation is carried on by means of oared barges and rafts, constructed by pieces of wood bound together by cords. The blacks call the Niger the Nile, or "El Bar" (Arab, "the sea"). The river is subject to regular ioodings, which fertiliza the lands on its banks, the only one which are cultivable; the inundation reaches the walls of the town. The country is very fertile; the crops are sorgho, millet, rice, tomato, onions, turnips, indigo grows wild. There are also many cosoa-nut trees, gum trees, and a tree which produces oil which the natives use for lighting. There are also forests of valuable timber trees. The country is governed by a Marabout, who takes the title of Sultan the present ruler is named Mohamet-el-Bekai. He does not reside at Timbuctoo; his capital is Ahmet-Ellah, a town of more than 100,000 souls, situated about twelve leagues from Timbuctoo. The road connecting the two towns id covered with villages and gardens. The town of Tim- buctoo is under the command of a Caid, who has very great authority, and who has under his orders a tax- collector, also very powerful. The Sultan has no army, but when fighting is necessary everybody is a soldier. They are armed with bows and arrows; only the chiefs have guns, pistols, and sabres. Trade is carried on prin- cipally by barter or by means of cowries. Caravans bring cotton or linen goods, glass trinkets, mirrors, arms, swords, guns, pistols (generally of English manu- facture), knives, needles, &c. Salt is a valuable im- port, a slave often being given for a kilogramme or two. The caravans take back loads of the grain of the country-rice, sorgho, millet, ostrich feathers, gum, ivory, gold dust, lead, copper, &c. Trade in slaves is carried on on a very large scale. To the north of Timbuctoo many camels are reared; to the south the people wander about with herds of sheep and cattle. The Rabbi also gave some interesting in- formation on the Sahara.

A STATUE TO JOSEPH MARIE JACQUARD.

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INDIAN GRAVES IN AMERICA.

THIRTY PERSONS POISONED.

RAILWAY DISASTER IN AMERICA.

CUTTINGS FROM AMERICAN PAPERSI

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