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CETYWAYO AS A CAPTIVE.

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AN UNEXPECTED ENEMY.

A ZULU ACCOUNT OF THE BATTLE…

THE REVIVAL OF TRADE IN AMERICA.

A FORMIDABLE WAR SHIP.

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MR. CROSS ON THE POLICY OF…

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THE CORN TRADE.

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THE CORN TRADE. Thb course of the past week (says the Mark Lane Eotprees) has been marked by somewhat more favour- able weather, the temperature having been cool and seasonable, and the rainfall inconsiderable. Notwith- standing the exertions of farmers, a large quantity of cereal produce is still unsecured and exposed to the vicissitudes of the weather. Agricultural advices are still couched in most dolefnl terms. The disastrous season of 1879 will long be remembered, and it is devoutly to be hoped that many a year may elapse ere another be found to equal it in cold rain and sunleaB gloom. Supplies at markets in the provinces have somewhat increased, in response to the requirements of farmers for thresh- ing purposes, but the inferiority of the bulk of the offering haa not prevented a further rise of 2s. per quarter in the value of parcels suitable for milling. The average price waa also 8d. per quarter higher last week. Last Monday's Hat showed arrivals of foreign wheat into London of only about 28,000 quarters, chiefly American, and aubsequent imports to Friday were about 61,000 quarters. Prices again favoured eellers to the extent of fully 2s. per quarter. Higher prices may still be expected.

THE POSTAGE OF THE WORLD.

CINCHONA CULTIVATION IN CEYLON.

THE METEOROLOGICAL REPORTS.

PROPOSED MONUMENT TO CAPTAIN…

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CO-OPERATION AMONG WORKING…

NATIONAL THRIFT.

INFORMATION ABOUT TIMBUCTOO.

A STATUE TO JOSEPH MARIE JACQUARD.

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INDIAN GRAVES IN AMERICA.

THIRTY PERSONS POISONED.

RAILWAY DISASTER IN AMERICA.

CUTTINGS FROM AMERICAN PAPERSI

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