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CETYWAYO AS A CAPTIVE.

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AN UNEXPECTED ENEMY.

A ZULU ACCOUNT OF THE BATTLE…

THE REVIVAL OF TRADE IN AMERICA.

A FORMIDABLE WAR SHIP.

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A FORMIDABLE WAR SHIP. The Times of Monday said It has for some time past been asserted without contradiction that a firm of shipbuilders on the Clyde has received an order from the Rugsian Government for the construction of a monster ironclad which is to be practically invulne- rable, and the subject is attracting considerable interest in official circles. It is said that tne vessel is to have an armoured deck in shape something like the back of a tortoise, with sharp e tges all round on which an iron ram may expend its force only to its own injury, or at most cut through a mere fringe into one of numberless watertight compartments. The surfaces above and below the water, being made on the same slope, would offer no mark for an opponent's shot, which would glance off with out doing any serious injury, and only vertical firing, which is always unreliable, or battering from above at close quarters, which the monitor's own heavy guns might repel, could be used against such an antagonist. The old system of boarding might avail, but as the ship is to be 500ft. in length oy 100ft. broad, she would probably carry a great number of men, and boarding might not be so easy. The torpedo alone she would have to fear, and against the torpedo she would have to take her chance with the rest. Her «rm»ment, ac- cording to conjecture, will consist of four or more 100- ton guns, mounted on the disappearing principle. together with appliances for projecting torpedoes, and it is intended to make her, for attack as well as defence, at least the equal of any other ship afloat. It is calculated that a vessel of such a build, though provided with 10,000-horse power engines, cannot be of great speed, but this is regarded as a secondary con- sequence in a ship which is described as unassailable. The circular ironclads which the Russians already possess are regarded as failures, because their perpen- dicular sides offer a ready target to the enemy, and Admiral Popoff, who has designed the new vessel, is understood to have adopted the idea propouuded more than ten years ago by a member of the firm to whom the execution of the work is now intrusted. Thb Poly- phemus, now building for the British Navy, will be some- what similar, in having a sloped deck of iron armour, but she will be small in comparison, and fight only with her ram and torpedoes, being unprovided with guns. In appearance, except in her breadth of beam, it is thought that the proposed ship will much resemble any other, the tortoise-like deck being covered by a temporary or hurricane deck, containing the officers' and men's cabins and other apartments, which would be abandoned when going into action, and might be all shot away without injury to the vital part of the vessel."

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MR. CROSS ON THE POLICY OF…

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THE CORN TRADE.

THE POSTAGE OF THE WORLD.

CINCHONA CULTIVATION IN CEYLON.

THE METEOROLOGICAL REPORTS.

PROPOSED MONUMENT TO CAPTAIN…

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CO-OPERATION AMONG WORKING…

NATIONAL THRIFT.

INFORMATION ABOUT TIMBUCTOO.

A STATUE TO JOSEPH MARIE JACQUARD.

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INDIAN GRAVES IN AMERICA.

THIRTY PERSONS POISONED.

RAILWAY DISASTER IN AMERICA.

CUTTINGS FROM AMERICAN PAPERSI

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