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CETYWAYO AS A CAPTIVE.

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AN UNEXPECTED ENEMY.

A ZULU ACCOUNT OF THE BATTLE…

THE REVIVAL OF TRADE IN AMERICA.

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THE REVIVAL OF TRADE IN AMERICA. The Daily Nexos publishes a letter from their corre- spondent at New York, from which we make the following extracts There are many indications that this country is entering upon an era of exceptional prosperity. A revival of trade is reported from all quarters. Mills which have been idle for years are now in full opera- tion. Many of the New England factories, espe- cially those making print cloths, are running night and day, and are making unusually large profits. In the iron districts of Pennsylvania and Ohio there is greater activity than there has been since 1873. All the rolling mills are at work with a full number of hands, and in some cases there is more work than the supply of labourers can attend to. In New York the revival is everywhere apparent. The large warehouses are surrounded with outgoing and incoming cases of goods. and the streets are thronged with drays. Imported goods which have been kept in very light stock for several years, more as samples than in expectation of sales, are now in great demand. Fine silks, trimmings, and laces, sell readily, and there is difficulty in meeting the demand. One of the largest Broadway dealers reports that he imported a most elaborate silk pattern, more for display than anything else, and had hardly placed it on his counter, with a price mark of £ 5 a yard, before it was sold. The same report comes from the cloth dealers, who furnish the tailors with their goods. The demand is for the best goods, which in this case means English goods. From the carpet trade a similar report is made. The pricea are higher, and the deinana for the best goods is steadily Increasing. From the provision dealers comes the same story of a growing export trade. The foreign demands are said to be larger this year than ever before, and some entirely new developments are noticed. For example, the price of butter has been advanced by the great demand for export, which is the largest ever known. One steamer took 6,000 packages to Germany last week. Large shipments are also making to England, Scotland, and Ireland. The dealers in fine groceries report an increased demand for luxuries, including a great variety of imported articles. In no branch of industry has the revival been so marked as in that of iron manufacturing. All the manufacturers report a demand far in excess of the supply, and an advance in price from 25 to 30 per per cent., according to the kind of iron. The industry has been very much depressed during the past five years, and the price of iron had run down to a very low point. The revival has come within the past thirty or forty days, and has taken the manufacturers so com- pletely by surprise that they are not able to meet the demands upon them. This has had a good deal to do with forcing up the price; but it is thought that as soon as the manufacturers have replenished their stock they will have no difficulty in furnishing all the iron required. All the rolling mills are full of orders, and are running to their extreme capacity. The chief demand comes from the railroad companies. They were compelled by the hard times to economise closely for several years, and the consequence wai that many roads became badly out of repair. The prospect of increased traffic has induced them now to repair ^ejr tracks and to add to their rolling stock. This was the beginning of the improvement in the trade. One mill after another became crowded with orders, until it was difficult to get work done at all. As soon as this state of affairs was discovered, the merchants and dealers in iron made a rush to get their stockB replenished before further orders stood in their way. The result is that every rolling mill his more work than it can attend to for the rest of the year. Another element which stimulated the new activity was the building of the elevated railroads in New York, which greatly increased the demand, one con- tract alone calling for 30,000 tons of iron. A natural effect of the general revival in industry has been the lessoning of labour strikes. In the iron business wages have been advanced five per cent., and still further increase ia probaole. There are occasional strikes in the minor branches of trade, but they are of short duration. In all kinds of work the labourer is in demand, and the rule is that he is getting better pay than he has had for a good many year-. A recent strike in one of the iron mills of Pennsylvania i was settled amicably without any increase of wagea. The employers assured the men that they i could not pay any higher wages while they were fill. icg the present low-priced contracts, but that within a lew weeks higher-priced contracts will be taken up, and still higher ones will follow, and that all increase in profits will be shared with the men. Of course promises of this kind are entirely satisfactory to the labourer. In some mills, where work is pushed for- ward day and night, the labourers complain of over- work.

A FORMIDABLE WAR SHIP.

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MR. CROSS ON THE POLICY OF…

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THE CORN TRADE.

THE POSTAGE OF THE WORLD.

CINCHONA CULTIVATION IN CEYLON.

THE METEOROLOGICAL REPORTS.

PROPOSED MONUMENT TO CAPTAIN…

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CO-OPERATION AMONG WORKING…

NATIONAL THRIFT.

INFORMATION ABOUT TIMBUCTOO.

A STATUE TO JOSEPH MARIE JACQUARD.

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INDIAN GRAVES IN AMERICA.

THIRTY PERSONS POISONED.

RAILWAY DISASTER IN AMERICA.

CUTTINGS FROM AMERICAN PAPERSI

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