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CETYWAYO AS A CAPTIVE.

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AN UNEXPECTED ENEMY.

A ZULU ACCOUNT OF THE BATTLE…

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A ZULU ACCOUNT OF THE BATTLE OF ISANDLANA. A Zulu prisoner, taken after Ulundi, has furnished some interesting additional particulars of the affair at Isandlaua, and bears testimony to the valour of our men (writes the Cape Town Correspondent of The Times). He says :— The Zulu army reached the neighbourhood of Lord Chelmsford's camp on the 21st of January. They intended to rest all next day as they had had a long march, and on the 231 to attack the camp; their orders being that if they defeated the English troops they were to sweep through Natal. They had no idea that part of the English forces had left the camp. The attack was brought on prema- turely by their position being discovered by some of our scouts, who reported their presence, when Colonel Durnford sent out some of his mounted men to skirmish. This excited the Zulu regiments they fired at all who advanced against them, and this caused the advance of the whole Zulu army, and brought on a general action, with the sad result we all know. The narrator stated that after the soldiers were driven back into the camp, they fought for some time among the tents, but, being driven from there, a large body formed in a square near some of the wagons, and kept the Zulus at bay until their ammunition was exhausted, when they retreated to the neck; there they were completely surrounded by masses of the enemy and made their last stand, beating off with their bayonets (the officers alone still firing from their revolvers) re- peated attempts to break their ranks, until the Zulus, finding they could not succeed in a hand-to-hand fight, stood around them, just beyond the reach of the bayonets, and threw their assegais into the square until every one of our brave fellows fell. When the fight was over and the butchery con- cluded, the Zulus were under the impression that th*t they bad destroyed the whole of the Eng- lish army. What, then, was the consternation of those who, after following the fugitives to the Buffalo and beyond it, were returning in triumph to the camp to see in the distance Lord Chelmsford's column returning to Isandlana. The alarm at once spread among them. 'Why.' said they, 'we thought we had destroyed the whole English army, but it appears it is only the camp followers and sick we have been fighting with there is the impi intact.' A regular panic ensued, and they hurried away from the field, and had Lord Chelmsford only been aware of this, and followed up the retreating host next morning with his mounted men, they would probably have been utterly routed; but, of course, he did not know how matters stood. The regiments which attacked the post at Rorke's Drift were in the reserve, and not actually engaged in the fight at Isandlana, although pre- seat at it. They aIM believed that the whole English force was destroyed, and when on their way back next morning they saw the cloud of dust caused by Lord Chelmsford's troops, on their return march to Rorke's Drift, and observed the mounted men and the red coats of the soldiers, they believed at first it was the army that had been slain on the pre- vious day come to life again." Cetywayo states that he got information that three British columns were marching into Zaluland from Natal and the Transvaal and that another was coming from Delagoa Bay; and it is probably owing to the latter report that he kept large reserves of his warriors at Ulundi and that Natal was saved from invasion. At first he thought that one column of our troops was entirely destroyed at Isandlana, bnt afterwards ascertained that such was not the case. The engagements at Isandlana, Inyezane, and Ginghilova were not planned beforehand; they were merely accidental. That at Ginghilova was under- taken by the local forces, consisting of the Zulu tribes in that part of the country, who were ordered to surround Pearson's camp at Ekowe. The attack upon Kambula, however, was ordered by himself from his military kraal, Undini, and it was carried out under the direct command of his chief induna or Prime Minister, Umnymana. Umbelini's people at Zlobane sent word their stronghold was going to be attacked, and he sent help to them.

THE REVIVAL OF TRADE IN AMERICA.

A FORMIDABLE WAR SHIP.

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MR. CROSS ON THE POLICY OF…

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THE CORN TRADE.

THE POSTAGE OF THE WORLD.

CINCHONA CULTIVATION IN CEYLON.

THE METEOROLOGICAL REPORTS.

PROPOSED MONUMENT TO CAPTAIN…

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CO-OPERATION AMONG WORKING…

NATIONAL THRIFT.

INFORMATION ABOUT TIMBUCTOO.

A STATUE TO JOSEPH MARIE JACQUARD.

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INDIAN GRAVES IN AMERICA.

THIRTY PERSONS POISONED.

RAILWAY DISASTER IN AMERICA.

CUTTINGS FROM AMERICAN PAPERSI

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