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IMEMORIAL TO THOMAS CLARKSON.

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THE (PROPOSED PARTIAL DISABMA.!…

FARMING IN SCOTLAND.

THE BISHOP OF MANCHESTER ON…

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THE BISHOP OF BEDFORD ON "BOOKS,…

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GYMNASTICS BY STEAK POWER.

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GYMNASTICS BY STEAK POWER. Amongst the curiosities now to be seen at the ex- hibition in the Champs Eiyeeoa Is one of the new machines far exercising the human frame without any exertion on the part of the person exercised. According to the description given of the apparatus by a scientific correspondent of the Patrie the patient, as it seems most proper to call him, is in- stalled in a sort of arm-chair, and is invited to place his arms in two metal rests, shaped in the form of a bow, and each supported by iron roda which are capable of giving it a lateral as well as « horizontal motion, while his back at the same time rests against a strong metal framework, by which the whole body is forced forwards and backwards alternately. When the mechanism is set in mo- tion, the individual operated upon finds himsel £ suddenly going through a series of evolutions more or less intricate which he is powerless either to stop or direct. The exercise once begun must be continued as long as the machine is kept in motion, and of course it rests with the director or driver of the apparatus to de- liver his victim from a position which to some be- ginners may not feel very agreeable. The inventor of this system is a Swedish man of science named Dr. Zander, who is said to have constructed no less than seventeen different machines for similar purposes, each designed to favour the development of distinct muscles. Perhaps the most remarkable thing about them is, however, that they are generally worked by steam. It is not very long since the luxury of having one's hair brushed by steam power was intro- duced, or even siace the hobby-horses at fairs began to be whirled round by the same agency, while a steam organ-grinder trumpeted forth the most inspiriting of tunes. But we have now a fresh application of tha giant to practical purposes, and it is impossible to say how far the doctors may go in this direction now that they have once introduced suoh an agent into the field of hygienic exercise. There seems to be no valid reason why heneeforth boys should not be taught to row, or ladies to play billiards, by the use of the new apparatus. There is a familiar tale about the way in which the ancient Romans taught their seamen to row by first exercising them on dry land; and if Duilius and his fellow-admirals could only have pressed Dr. Zander into their service as a boatswain they would have made still greater progress than they did. One exercise there is at any rate which might, seriously speaking, be adapted to the mechanical system. It might possibly be applied both with success and with advantage in teaching on dry land the elementary movements of the art of swirnrning, -Globe.

MR. W. E. FORSTER, M.P., ON…

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