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Our Tonbon Corresjjaitbenf.

THE ENTRY INTO CABUL.

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The Evening Standard of Monday publishes the fol- lowing from their Special Correspondent:— BEFORE CABUL, Oct. 10. On the morning of the 8th the whole Cavalry Brigade, consisting of a squadron of the 9th Lancers, the 5th Punjab Cavalry, 12th Bengal Cavalry, and the 14th Bengal Lancers, were ordered to mount suddenly, and trotted along the roads towards Bala Hissar. On nearing the fort the brigade turned to the right, skirting the hills. It then trotted on to Shahpore, where the enemy were reported the day before A large body of the enemy were discovered upon a high hill to the front swarming along the ridge. It seemed difficult to turn their position. The brigade, however, advanced, and halted close to a !arge tort. It was found deserted. Through an open gate a squadron of the 6th Punjab Cavalry entered and discovered seventy-two guns, Arm- strongs, mountain battery, and howitzers. The magazine was still smouldering, having been blown up the night before when the enemy abandoned the f >rt. This accounts for the tremendous shock felt In the camp. The cavalry now took up a position In reserve, and were placed on all the roads guarding the retreat. The artillery advanced from the camp and shelled the heights, the enemy returning the fire. Running along the entire crest of the enemy's hill was a high walL Their camp was pitched with lta base facing the cavalry holding the rear of the hill. The Artillery fired until sunset, the enemy maintaining the position, from which it was impossible to dislodge them without Infantry. Baker's Brigade did not come up until It was too dark to make an attack. The Cavalry bivouacked at night Inside some walled enclosures. Just before dark the 14th Bengal Lancers made a daah and killed some men firing at our water parties. Early In the morning the 9th Cavalry observed that the enemy's position was abandoned. The line of retreat was ascertained to be towards Ghuzni, and they had been fifing all night. A very harassing pursuit took place. It was carried on tor fifteen miles. Some of the horses fell out and died. The enemy were scattered on the hills in all directions in small parties. Some troops of the 6th Punjab Cavalry pursued them over the hills; another party cut off the retreat, and 17 were killed. There were no more signs of the enemy, who were completely routed. The 12 th Bengal Cavalry reconnoitred some miles further, and twenty-one miles off captured six field guns, six mountain gun., some eleghants, camels, horses, &o., and a few prisoners. The remainder of the force returned to camp, doing nearly forty miles that day. On returning they rode through the city of Cabul, now entered for the nrti time. The Bazaar was immense and picturesque. Some shops were open, and people sitting about. The merchants are returning dally. We found the camp pitched on a new site, close to the Bala Hissar. The Artillery and the Cavalry are In the plain; the Infantry on a small hill In the rear. All was quiet last night. The date of the final entry is unknown. There are some doubts as to the Bala Hissar being mined. No more fighting here is expected, though there may be a little In the country later on. The expedition has been en- tirely successful. The troops have worked splendidly, ad. vancing without tents, and cawylnn their ratlona. Roberts deserves well for his energy In successfully com- batting grave transport difficulties.

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CABUL DESCRIBED.

ft* Hltstc(hrirc0us Intelligent,

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