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MANSLAUGHTER BY AN OXFORD…

EXECUTION AT GLOUCESTER.

THE NEW SEARCH FOR DR. LIVINGSTONE.

REPRIEVE OF THE COVENTRY MURDERER.

REGISTERED LETTERS IN FRANCE.

TOO MUCH OF A JOKE!

[No title]

THE RAILWAY SERVANTS'AGITATION.

WORKING MEII'S CLUBS.

[No title]

A TALE OF TWO SIXPENCES.

[No title]

VENTILATION OF SEWERS.

INTEMPERANCE IN IRELAND.

LION AND LION-TAMING.

DEATH OF SIR FRANCIS CROSSLEY…

MEMORIAL CHAPEL TO THE LATE…

[No title]

BREAD AND ITS ADULTERATIONS.

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BREAD AND ITS ADULTERATIONS. (From the Lancet.) For several years we continued to expose in the pages of this journal very clearly and systematically the many and scandalous adulterations to which nearly every article of food and drink was then, and is still, though to a less degree, subjected. In doing so we published in every case the name and address of the vendor of each article, and this whether it was found on analysis to be genuine or adulterated. In this way the names of some 3,000 merchants and traders were pro- claimed. This procedure was one of so much boldness and risk that it has hitherto found no imitators, and it is not a little surprising that we should have been able to do this for so long a period with impunity. Having, in the most unhesitating manner possible, exposed nearly all ths deteriorations and adulterations to which food is subject, and so rendered an important public service, we left it to the public and the legislature to find a remedy for so gigantic and demoralising an eviL s The public, however, through roused for a time, have for the most part continued to display that apathy for which it is so remarkable on nearly all questions of a sanitary character, and which are really amongst the most important and practical which can engage the attention of mankind, while the government of the day has contented itself with talking about the liberty of the subject, and with legislating for the evil in a most feeble and nearly useless manner. Once more, however, the apathy of the public shows some slende signs of giving way, and attention is now in certain quarters being again directed to the subject of adulte- ration. The fact that the subject will be discussed in the next session of parliament with a better chance of its being legislated upon has led us to again take up the question. Probably nothing has tended so much to discredit the question of adulteration in the eyes of the scientific and the public generally as the exaggerated and false statements which have been put forth from time to time. Any person conversant with this subject, on reading almost any book on adulteration, cannot but be struck with the mixture of pure invention or mistake with actual fact he meets with in nearly every page. Not long since the alarming statement went the round of the press that our daily bread was commonly adulterated with sulphate of copper or blue -vitriol It was, in fact, to test this statement that we instituted, several weeks ago, some analyses of bread purchased in various parts of London, and with the following results: —1. That the quantity of salt contained in the breads varied from 91 to 226 grains per 41b., loaf those sam- ples as a rule, containing the most salt which were free from alum. 2. That of the twenty breads examined, ten, or one half, were free from alum while in the other ten samples the amount present varied from 12 to 96 grains the 41b. loaf. This result is certainly much more favourable than any that was obtained some fifteen years ago. 3. That not a trace of copper was found in any one of the samples, nor in eight other samples which were likewise examined. These investigations, therefore, do not lend the slightest support to the startling statement already alluded to as to the common adulteration of bread with copper. There is a fashion in fraud, as in most things; and it is this tyrant fashion which, for the mere sake of appearances, sacrifice too often the sub-' stance and that which is really desirable. The fashion in food, stated generally, is, that the eye and the palate must be pleased at all cost,_ even at_ the expense of quality, of nutritive properties, and of wholesomeness. There is even a special fancy in bread, and this is, that it should be particularly white. For this purpose it is in part, that alum is so much used with flour. A bread not very white is too often condemned, and this unjustly, as bad in quality. Thus the bread prepared from meal made from the whole grain, the outer as well as central portion, is not nearly so white as ordi- nary or alumed bread, but it is far more nutritious and wholesome.

I CUTTINGS FROM AMERICAN PAPERS.

Miscellaneous áfnttlHgtlltt,

THE MARKETS.