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.¡ THE PRINCE OF WALES.

NEW YEAR'S SERMON BY MR.'…

RAILWAY SERVANTS.

PUBLIC-HOUSES WITHOUT DRUNKENNESS.

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PUBLIC-HOUSES WITHOUT DRUNKENNESS. A correspondent, "F. B. has sent the following commu nication, in connection with this subject, to The Times, and we reprint it with the hope that the experiment may excite public interest in a subject so intimately connected with the elevation of the working-classes :— The concluding paragraph in yojir valuable article of the 26th, in which you urge the importance of pro- viding a safe and cheerful place of evening resort for "men our brothers, men the workers," instead of con- tenting ourselves with declamations against the fatal attractions of the alehouse and gin-palace, induces me to ask for room in your columns to assure those who may be stirred by your earnest words that the enter- prise is neither a troublesome nor a costly one. In the village from which I write a working men's reading-room has just been opened, in which a good fire, a good lamp, and opportunities for reading and meeting their friends, without payment of any sort, are the attractions offered, at a cost, including a daily paper, of about £12 per annum. The room is furnished with table and chairs, an< £ the walls are hung with a few maps and pictures. On a shelf in a recess stand a few bound volumes of magazines, &c., and a chess- board and men, to which a draught-board will shortly be added. Above the books hangs the table of rules. There are five rules only :—1, No papers or books to be taken from the room 2, no papers or books to be introduced without leave 3, no smoking allowed 4, no cards, dice, or any kind of gambling or betting allowed 5, no one admitted under 18 years of age. Rule 3 is perhaps open to question but pains were taken beforehand to ascertain the judgment of the working men themselves, audit appeared to point in the direction of prohibition, ontheground thatitwas notfah-forthose who liked smoking to make the place disagreeable to those whodidnot. The complete arrangement would, of course, be to bavea separate smokingrocm, but this entails addi- tional expense not only in rent, but in fire and light. A managing committee of three of the working men has been appointed, who are to consider themselves as responsible for the maintenance of good order, and to report any modifications of the rules that experience may suggest. The room is open from 6 to 10 p.m. on week days, and from 1 to 6 p.m. on cundays. The newspapers are put away on Sundays, and reading suitable to the day substituted. I bear that frhe'-room was full on the day of opening, and that the men regard it as a great boon. When so important an advantage and safeguard can be secured at so small a pecu- niary sacrifice, is it not almost a disgrace to our country and village gentry that it is still necessary to urge the subject on their attention? It is most desirable that there should be as little parade of patronage and as little interference as possible. The more quietly the thing is done, and if possible by one person, the better. When the room is once opened it is easy to make it known through private channels, in addition to the signboard over the door or window. There seems to be no reason why, mutatix mutandis, similar opportunities should not be afforded to working men of large and small towns, but in what I have said I h1\VC confined myself to my own village experience.

LONG TRIAL IN MARYLAND.

LIFEBOAT WORK IN 1871. \

- A SCENE FROM A LONDON POLICE-COURT.

TWO ROYAL MOTHERS.

CHURCH REFORMS.

--NEW YEAR'S EVE AT A FRIENDS'…

THE SPANISH GOVERNMENT AND…

DISCONTENT.

SUNDAY TRADING IN LONDON.

IUttsallaitcoiis Inldligwct,