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lltetmpolitan: (Sffsstp.

.¡ THE PRINCE OF WALES.

NEW YEAR'S SERMON BY MR.'…

RAILWAY SERVANTS.

PUBLIC-HOUSES WITHOUT DRUNKENNESS.

LONG TRIAL IN MARYLAND.

LIFEBOAT WORK IN 1871. \

- A SCENE FROM A LONDON POLICE-COURT.

TWO ROYAL MOTHERS.

CHURCH REFORMS.

--NEW YEAR'S EVE AT A FRIENDS'…

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NEW YEAR'S EVE AT A FRIENDS' MEETING-HOUSE. A writer In the Daily Telegraph gives the following ac- count of a visit he paid to the Friends' Meeting House in Peel-court, St. John-street, London, on Sew Year a Eve Any stranger going on Sunday evening to a place of Quaker assemblage would be aware that the meeting on New Year's Lve was simply an accident of New Year's Eve falling on Sunday. High days and holy days are not recognised by Friends but when denial or dissent springs from an active principle it is apt to be quite as positive as affirmation, and it was not im- possible that a meeting of Friends would, in the very zeal of controversy, overleap the intention to discoun- tenance an anniversary celebration by some edifying remarks on the subject. The meeting-house in Peel-court, J ohn-street-n. neighbourhood but little changed amid "surrounding mutations "would hold ten times the number of Friends who met there yester-eve. It is a large square building, plain to the verge of depressing ugli- ness and, in addition to its ample ground space, it has wide galleries, which were, on the occasion we speak of, empty. If there were not many benches below in the same condition, the fact is ascribable to the habit which prevails among Friends of sitting as far apart as possible. To speak by the card, there were nineteen male and seventeen female Friends present during the whole meeting, which lasted from six until twenty minutes past seven o'clock. For a considerable part of this time the congregation did not number half so many and, as the new comers dropped slowly in, the curious observer might have wabched in vain for any precise formality marking the rigid manners of the sect. the beard movement and the adoption of the wide- awake ■' in preference to the high stiff hat of modern convention, hare made as much way with the Quakers as with "their even Christians in city and suburb. Nor do Quakeresses generally eschew the flounced skirt, artificially distended, the floral hat and the florid chignon. At the Peel-court Meeting-house the benches in the open midst of the square floor face the farthest side from the entrance, until the limit is nearly reached, and then they turn the other way. There are also two rows of raised seats along the sides right and left; so that, altogether, the arrangement 'seems as good as it could be for bringing Friends face to face, there being no minister or spiritual head for them to look at. There is a separation of the sexes during the meeting, female Friends taking their seats to the right of the entrance, and male Friends to the left. Few architectural signs about the meeting-house near Smithfield would serve to indicate its age within half a century, but it must at least be old enough to have its memories of intolerant times when the name given to the Society of Friends in scorn yet served to rouse passionate prejudices, and incite the ignorant to acts of brutality. One has only to sit in this dull chamber, and hear the continual din without, to understand what the case of the congregation must have been when the noise and interruption came, not from a heedlessly uproarious population, somewhat influencedby theSabbatli gin and beer, but from designedly .offensive mobs, whom the law rather abetted than checked. The outward sounds last evening, the yelling of boys, the barking of dogs, the laughing and shouting of tipsy revellers, mingled with the bells of the" steeple-houses "-as George Fox, the first Quaker, called our churches— made the silence inside more painfully irksome. Now and then a cough, and now and then a wearisome sigh —but never one word so much as whispered- broke that dumb sitting of an hour and twenty minutes. There was but one personage among the thirty- si^wbo bore the aspect once commonly distinctive wearing a hat with as broad a brim as may be seen in a day's march and he was one of the very few, by the bye, on the male side of the meeting, who remained with their heads covered. lie seemed as likely a man as any there to be moved unto speech by the Spirit; but he was not moved, and nobody else was moved but he was not moved, and nobody else was moved and, at twenty minutes past seven o'clock, neither earlier nor later, two Friends, who were probably Elders, and who sat on the long cross-seat fronting the entrance, rose suddenly and simultaneously whero- upon the whole meeting rose suddenly and simul- taneously, and walked out into the damp smoky air and the greasy mud of Clerkenwell.

THE SPANISH GOVERNMENT AND…

DISCONTENT.

SUNDAY TRADING IN LONDON.

IUttsallaitcoiis Inldligwct,