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IMFEEIAL TAHJDAKLSNT.

A BISHOP'S OPINIONS ON THE…

SIR HERBERT CROFT, M.P., AND…

TEE POWER OF THE PRESS.

AUSTRALIAN PRESERVED MEAT.

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AUSTRALIAN PRESERVED MEAT. The following interesting letter is from The Times'Aus- tralian Correspondent:— Only some two years ago it was an unsolved problem whether Victorian sheep and cattle, then becoming rapidly of litte more worth to the breeders than so much walking tallow (even when fat), could^have an exchangeable value given to them as butchers meat in distant and more populous maikets. Science took the subject in hand, uid patent after patent was applied for, for the preservation of meat both in the cooked and uncooked states. Was the thing practicable ? and if go would it pSiV ? The first ftnswer to b)th these questions, and in a very practical and satisfactory form, has been afforded within the last few days by the report and balance-sheet of the Melbourne Meat Preserving C jmpwiv for the half-year ending the 23th of last montb. Within that period the company have worked off 160,752 sheep and 590 head of cattle, the former costing £ 58,313 and the latter £ 3 298. The expenditure in wag^s during the half-year was £84.213 and the profit as far as computable at present—the precise amount depending on the results of sales in Eugland, of ™n,ctl are not ) et informed—is set down at i,ll._b» 14s, 3d, Toe directors were desirous of declaring a dividend in proportion to their profits, but being advised that they could only by the deed of settlement pay a dividend out of balances in band, they divide 10 per cent. on this occasion, and will probably be able to announce a still more satisfactory result next half-year. Several other companies have recently commenced operations, and one, as 1 learn from a prospectus just published, and with a large number of very respectable names attached to it, is about to place a portion of its shares on the London market. The demand for these meats is rapidly increasing, not merely in England atd on the Continent, but even tor local consumption io our own colony, showing pretty clearly that the pro- ducts of the company are regarded by a. numeronB class rather as a luxury than aa a. mere substitute for ^I'confes^that when I first read of Mr.' Taller man's penny dinners on Australian preserved meats I could only regard them as a clap-trap sort of advertisement likely to do the Australian meat interest more harm than good. I am informed, however, by the gentleman here, managing the establishment which consigns to Mr. Tallerman, that as these penny dinners are princi- pally carried away in the customer's own disbe*, the purveyors are at small expense for establishment and plant, and that a profit, though not large, may actually, be made at the price. Besides, as appetites vary, 1 believe that the charges vary accordingly, as it is not reasonable to suppose that an English navvy could be filled even with Australian meat. supplemented by English vegetables, at the cost of one penny. All reasonable doubts, however, being satisfied, it does look as if we have achieved a sort of revolution in the home food market,—a revolution, too, which must have not only a direct but a reflex action on English interests. -For every penny dinner eaten in England our squatters, graziers, farmers, and labourers will possess some proportionate command over English manu- factures. Before the starling of these preserved meat factories, it was a commonly expressed opinion that squatting had seen its best days and that some of the less valuable runs would have to be abandoned as un- profitable. This new interest, judging from the price the Melbourne Company have, during the past six months been paying for sheep, viz., an average of 7s. 3d. a head, has fixed a minimum below which it is not very likely the price of the animal will falL The ordinary consumption by Melbourne and the suburbs is reported to be about 10,000 a week. The 6,000 a week further demand by the company arrested at once the downward tendency in the price of stock, and has probably saved not a few squatters from ruin. The squatters as a body, however, have neither done nor attempted much in the starting of this new business. The work has been achieved principally by a few spirited and methodical Melbourne merchants, some of whom may yet live to see our dty as remark- able for the export of her sheep and cattle as are Cin- cinnati and Chicago for their export of hogs. To show how a food supplying manufacture of this kind grows, we read in Sir Morton Peto's book that while only o2,849 hogs were killed in the latter place for export, in the year 1853, the number had increased to 904,159 in the year 1803.^ "They are all killed by machinery," we are told, in the quickest and most scientific way. within twenty minutes of the time of your hearing the pig squeak he is killed, cut up, packed in barrels, and on his way to Europe." It thus appears to be the natural work of new countries in large measure to feed the old, a happy consequence of that spontaneous divi- sion of labour which sustains all the civilized nations of the globe. I must not quit this subject without informing you of the result of a recent shipment of meats to this colony, preserved, as the consignees informed us, under Professor Gamgee'rf process A special convocation of persons interested in the subject attended by invitation last week at Messrs. Gold borough and Co.'s wool stores, to witnfess the opening of the packages, a cere- monial which caused as great a sensation as that which Smollett's hero, curious in the refinements of old Roman cookery, produced on the olfactories of his assembled classical guests on the occasion of open- ing the Roman pie. Professor Gamgee's meat had be- comeso thoroughly putrid that few persons cared to stay m the room with it any longer than civility to the conveners demanded. The livid colour of many por- tions showed that decomposition must long since have set in, notwithstanding which some of the most re- spectable judges in the room inclined to the opinion that the ill success of this experiment is by no means conclusive against Professor Gamgee's process. Whether, as some surmise, the fat enclosing wrappage neutralizes the effect of the previous treatment --intended to arrest decomposition --or whether the failure is merely ex- ceptional, and arises from some accidental slip in the manipulation, is as yet a mystery. Additional light may be thrown upon the subject in a few week?, as a second shipment of meats, preserved by the same pro- cess, is reported to be now on its way to this country.

GARDENING OPERATIONS FOR THE…

THE GREEK MASSACRE. j

[No title]

[No title]

" MR. LLOYD TO LORD MUNCASTER.

" MR. F. G. VYNER TO LORD…

TURNING HORSES OUT TO GRASS.

THE YOUNG MEN IN WOMEN'S CLOTHES.

[No title]

FUNERAL OF MR. EDWARD HERBERT.

MURDER BY A MOTHER.

CUTTINGS FROM AMERICAN PAPERS.

EPITOME OF NEWS,

THE MARKETS.