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- ALIVE IN THE DEAD-HOUSE.

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THE ORDER OF RELEASE!

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THE EXTRAORDINARY DOUBLE !…

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THE INQUEST ON MB. HUELIN.

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MR. SPURGEON IN DUNDEE.

A MOURNFUL AFFAIR,

THE "BOMBAY" AND THE "ONEIDA.'

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SOMETHING ABOUT ASPARAGUS.

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SOMETHING ABOUT ASPARAGUS. A French paper gives some seasonable information with regard to asparagus. This vegetable grows wild in France, and may even now ba gathered in the Bois de Viccennes and other French forests. The wild asparagus is long, thin, and green all through, and has a slightly acid but agreeable taste. It WM first culti- vated nearly a hundred years ago by a well known horticulturist, Louis Therault. He was at once strongly impressed with the difficulty since felt of rearing asparagus successfully, and declared that in order to produce a good result the watchfulness of a parent aLd the skill of a physician are needed by the young plamp. They require above all things plenty of sunshine, and seem to acknowledge their obligations by pushing up their shoots towards the rising sun. Most of the asparagus eaten in Paris is grown at Argenteuil. Three sorts are cultivated there the early, intermediate, and late. The early variety comes up about the 25th of March; it then costs 10 francs the bundle of twenty stalks. The first bundle generally appears on the Emperor's table. The very largett stalks cost from 40 to 60 francs. Besides the Argenteuil asparagus, the consumption of which greatly increases year by year, Paris is supplied with asparagus from the south. This is long and green, has a fine flavour, and requires very little cooking, but is not much apprtciattd by the Parisians.

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