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-----=----A QUESTION OF '…

PROCLAMATION OF THE EMPEROR…

THE SEFTON LIBEL CASE.

IRISH EMIGRATION. ---

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CAPTURED AND MURDERED BY BRIGANDS.

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The Leicestershire Chronicle publishes, in its issue of the 22nd of April, the following letter from Mr. J. E. Hodges to his brother Mr. George H. Hodges, of Leicester "Athens, April 13. "I must now tell you of an event which has occurred here, and which has filled Athens with excitement. It seems that Lord and Lady Muncaster, Mr. Vyner, Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd, and daughter (a child of six years old), all of whom were staying at this hotel, accompanied by the Secretaries of the English and Italian Legations, left here on Monday morning for a visit to Marathon, a few miles from here. They started in two carriages, accompanied by a well-known guide, and a guard of four soldiers. They took luncheon with them, intending to be back to dinner. It appears they had completed their excursion, and had got about half-way home again, when they were attacked by a party of brigands, numbering about thirty. They stopped the carriages, shot one of the soldiers dead on the spot, and severely wounded another. 'I hey then took the whole party prisoners, except one coachman, who escaped, and came in here, while we were at dinner, with the news. Their places at tab'e being empty, there had been some joking about their having been captured we little thinking such was the dreadful fact. The man was taken at once to the Hon. Mr. Erskine, our Minister here, to relate the story, and in a snort time a party of soldiers was sent in different directions in pursuit. "About half-past 10 at night Lady Muncaster and Mrs. Lloyd and child returued with the two unwounded soldiers, confirming the news, and adding that the gentlemen had been taken to the mountains, and that the brigands demanded a ransom of a million drachmas. It appears none of the party are injured, although one of the ladies was struck to force her out of the carriage but they were not even robbed. No further news was heard till lext morning, when, by the 'a advice of Mr. Erskine, the soldiers were recalled, it being thought that if the brigands were attacked the lives of their captives might be endangered. The troops are now back again I have jast beemaJking to agentlemanwhoia travel- ling with the party, and who has juat returned from an interview with the Hon. Mr. Er.-kine, and the impression is the money will have to be paid, and that very soon, as it is an easy matter for the brigands to escape into Turkish territory, where they would be comparatively safe. As you may imagine, the excitement is intense, and we have had no further news till now Wednesday. "The King, with one of his Ministers, has Just arrived, and has sent for Lord Muncaster to his palace. It is a marvellous thing that, within two hours of the capital of Greece, are a set of scoundrels dictating terms to this Government, as though they were a powerful nation, with an accredited Minister in the form of a brigand, who brings despatches, coolly waiting an answer "I have entered somewhat Into detail, as from the position of the captives, it will create considerable sensation, and of course there will be various stories of this affair; but this I know is correct as far as events have transpired. While I was sitting to-day writing in my room, I heard a great commotion, and, on going out to learn the cause, found Lord Muncaster had been rtl-ased on parole, either to send the ransom, or te return himself in three hours. You will be surprised when I tell you that, after he had had an inter view with Mr. Erskine and two other gentlemen, a wretched-looking horse and cart drove to the hotel door, which was filled with food and clothing for the captives, as it is said the brigands have none. Lord Muncaster fol- lowed in a carriage, and has gone back to the brigands. The result of his interview with Mr. Erskine has not transpired. The troops, however, are not to be sent in search-and all this happening in a civilised country—sup- posed to have a Government. We intended to have gone- to Marathon on Thursday but, of course, shall not do so now. I have just returned from the funeral of the soldier who was killed. The Greeks bury their dead with their faces exposed, In fact, there is no coffin lid at all. The ser- vice was very grand and impressive, and the church crowded. It was a painful sight to see the relatives, friends, and comrades kiss the dead man before he was carried out of church. "April 14. "It is the strangest thing that there Is a regular corre- spondence going on between the captives and their friends in this hotel. More food and clothing is sent for, and Lord Muncaster is back here again. A cut-throat looking scoundrel is waiting outside his door, having brought him a letter. It is stated that the brigands have raised their demands, and also demand a free pardon; and if not accepted in three days, they declare they will cut the throats of their captives and leave them." and leave them."

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"PINDER v. POTTER."

A QUESTION AS TO BUGS.

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