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-----=----A QUESTION OF '…

PROCLAMATION OF THE EMPEROR…

THE SEFTON LIBEL CASE.

IRISH EMIGRATION. ---

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CAPTURED AND MURDERED BY BRIGANDS.

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The followicg particulars, the substance of which is derived from a letter written by Lord Muncaster, have been published:— "On Saturday, the 9th of April, Lord Muncaster, who, with Lady Muncaster and a friend, Mr. Frederick Vyner. a younger brother of Lady de Grey and Ripon, was travelling in the East, applied, through the British Legation at Athens, far information as to the safety of visiting the plains of Marathon, and if an escort was necessary and could be fur- nished to enable them to do so. The reply was to the effect that the road was safe; that there were no brigands in Attica, but that an escort would be provided. Accordingly, on Monday, the 11th of April, at 6 30 a.m.. the party. consisting of Lord and Lady Mun- caster, Mr. Frederick Vyner, Mr. Herbert, one of the Secre- taries to Her Majesty's Legation, Count de Boyl, Secretary to the Italian Legation, and Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd, with their young child, five years of age, left Athens in two cirrisgts under the escort of four mounted gendarmes for Marathon, accompanied by a Suliote named Alexandroi, the most ex- perienctd and intelligent dragoman in Greece. "On traversing the plain, they fonsd a small detachment of six infantry soldiers, and afterwards a larger one of 25, apparently patroiling the road. After exploring the scene of one of the most interesting events in history, they atart.d to return to Athens. The detachment of 25 men appears to have endeavoured to keep company with them, but was unable to do so, and they again passed the smaller party of six men, who succeeded in keeping tolerably close in their rear At 4.30 p.m., entering a thickly-wooded part of the road near the bridge of Pikerneas, two mounted gendarmes riding one on either side of the carriages, and two front, a volley was suddenly fired into them, killing one of the gendarmef, and mcrtally wounding; another. The road was immediately filled with brigands, who forced the occupants out of the car- riages, using much violence, striking, though not severely. Lady Muncaster, and tearing off her watch and lockets, and menacing with knives the lives of all. They hurried their captives up the side of Mount Penteiicus, but had scarcely got 60 yards from the road when the six infantry soldiers came up and at once commenced firing into the brigands, who returned the lire. "The soldiers, finding themselves overmatched (the brigands being upwards of twenty in number), happily discontinued the engagement, which would have been probably fatal to the captives, who were collected in a body in their midst. "The brigands then hurried their prisoners up the alopesof Penteiicus, and after two hours' walking they put the ladies on the horses of the dismounted gendarmes, and, with one servant, let them go to AthenL "After the ladies had gone, the five gentlemen and Alexandros were compelled to walk with them up and down wooded ravines, sometimes resting for half an hour, till about two a.m. on Tuesday, the 12th of April, when they stopped in a dry watercourse to kill and roast three lambs, making their captives sit round the lire, and pressing upon them the insides of the animals. Weariness and depression of spirits had deprived them of appetite, even if the food had been more attractive, and they partook of nothing except some black bread and water, which was all the nourishment they had for upwards of 48 (?) hours. 1' Resuming their march, they halted again about daybreak, and all Tuesday lay under some bushes; luckily it was fine, so they did not suffer much. During that day they consulted as to what was to be done, and it was agreed to ask for one of their number to be allowed to to to Athens to arrange for payment of the ransom they demanded, and an amnesty. Alter several hours' talk between Alexandros and the captain of the band, the terms of ransom were settled so far as that the captain of the brigands reduced the enormous sum demanded, of £ 50.000 to the still enormous and extravagant sum of £ 21,000. He would not, however, suffar any further discussion, but, growing Impatient, said emphatically, Finish quickly!' The captives then arranged that Lord Muncaster should be the person to go in and make the arrangements necessary for his own and companions' release -a promise being exacted by the brigands that, failing in his mission, he was to return, and that the lives of the others depended on his success. Ihey promised to let Lord Man- caster go that night, but did not do so, as they could getne guide, and none of the brigands dared to be seen with one of their captives. "On Tuesday, throughout the night, they walked over boggy plains, and up and down hills, wet through from heavy rain, In which they lay down for three hours, till six in the mo-ning, when they started again, and then stopped for the day in a ravine, where a shepherd was found and a small cart obtained in which Lord Muncaster proceeded to Athens He, of course, made Immediate arrangements for sending food and clothing to his unfortunate friends, and for obtain- ing the money, which was promptly and generously placed' at his disposal by a merchant in Athens. The only difficulty lay in the transport of so large a turn in gold. — ■'

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"PINDER v. POTTER."

A QUESTION AS TO BUGS.

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