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-----=----A QUESTION OF '…

PROCLAMATION OF THE EMPEROR…

THE SEFTON LIBEL CASE.

IRISH EMIGRATION. ---

<©ar Jnnùnri Cartrspfln&jitt.

CAPTURED AND MURDERED BY BRIGANDS.

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"PINDER v. POTTER."

A QUESTION AS TO BUGS.

UlisttlliiRMiK Jmtfllifprt,

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UlisttlliiRMiK Jmtfllifprt, HOME, FOREIGN, AND COLONIAL. ATTEMPTED ESCAPE FROM A NOKNERT.—On Suudav moroin?, a nun, known as Sister Agne-, made h-r es: ape from the convent at Baideley, near Knowle, Warwickshire. She was captured by a Mrs. Heath. Although alleged to be icsane, she l ad provided her- self with Victuals, and when seized was on the public ri al, calling to a man to help her. Mrs. Heath ha^for lawny ytarjs been a "con fidential servant in the convent. Sist-r Agnea is described as one of the inner circle," and it gaui that only on rare occasions she bad an opportunity of escaping. At chapel on Sunday morn- ing she feigned illness, and start she would ray her piayersin thegtrden. On getting out she ciambered over a high wall, and got into the road, but was pureued aud captured. The greatest excitement prevailed in the neighbourhood in consequence. A CosTIUDICTION.—On the subject of a recent burglary at th* Hon. Mrs. James Norton's that lady writes to the Echo The Hon. Mrs. Norton presents her compliments to the Editor of the Echo, and. in answer to numerous letters on the subject, wishes to state that no burglary has been com- mitted at her house, that mischance having occurred to the Hon. Mrs. James Norton, widow of a clergyman, the Rev. James Norton, a junior branch of the family. The Hon. Mrs. James Norton is a daughter of Mr. Lowndes, and in- herited a competence from that gentleman; but with respect to any advantage to be gained by a nocturnal visit to the house of the Hon. Mrs. Norton she is anxious—not only for the reassurance of her friends, but for the information of those gentlemen who get their living by these irregular adventures-to declare that the most moderate-minded burglar would be disappointed in the result, unless he were able to avail himself of manuscript papers in verse and prose, and deal for them with some liberal publisher, there being nothing else in her house worth taking. THE EDUCATION QdKSTioN.—A meeting of about three thousand people was held on Monday night at Sheffield, for the purpose of considering the Education Bill and the varions amendments which have been proposed. The meeting expressed itself strongly in favour of undenominational teaching, and Mr. Mundella,M. P., while giving credit to the Govern- ment bill for its provisions, insisted that secular educa- tion was indispensable for the country.—At a meeting of the Education Union at Manchester, Bishop Frazer said it waa unfortunate the education question had passed into the hands of philosophers, doctrinaires, and system-framers, who had no practical knowledge of the matter. He suggested a modification of the Church Catechism. Resolutions in favour of the principles of the Union were passed. Nitw ZBALANDKRS AT COURT.—The Special Cor- respondent of the Southern Cross states that during the viceregal visit to the Thames the Maories who wer., presented to his Excellency brought cards of the newest la-hinn. It was tunny to see one of the na'ives, who presented his card as though he felt vastly important in so doing, but whose whole dress for the occasion consisted of a Crimean shirt and canvas trousers, worn to a fringe at the bottom of each leg. But that native, nevertheless, got through the presentation by no means badly, and he beamed with delight at the hand-shake of the Governor and his Excellency's greeting. A FEVER-STRICKEN TOWN.—Daring the past week Dr. Buchanan, a Government inspector, sent down by the Medical department of the Privy Council, h'lS been ensraged in making a sanitary inspection of the town of Wbitehaven. Attention had been directed to the high rate of mortality in the town, and inquiry showed that during the lafrt four months there had been, out of a population of 19,000 people, between 360 and 370 casi-s of typhus fever, and one patient out of every six hsd died. The medical officer of the local Board of Trustees, on being called upon to report on this sad state of affairs, attributed the frequent occurrence of fever at Whitehaven to overcrowding and defective drainage. Out of 4 538 inhabited houses, 2,500 had no drainage except the surface. He stated that he had urged upon the Board the absolute necessity of enforc- ing a proper and efficient system oi household drainage; some of his suggestions had been adopted, and some had not. Dr. Buchanan commenced a personal in- spection of the town, which occupied him three or four days. The effect produced upon his mind by this in- spection was that, after he had been in the town a few hours, he telegraphed to the Privy Council that White- haven, infected and overcrowded, was not a fit place for the Cumberland Militia to assemble in for their an- nual periodical training. In ordinary course the Militia, mustering, with" camp followers," athousand strong, would have assembled at Whitehaven this week, but the Adjutant, Captain Morris Fawcett, has, by order of the Secretary for War, issued a notice countermanding the former summons, and announcing that the Cumberland Militia are not to assemble this year. They will, however, receive their usual bounty. MATRIMONIAL CHANCKS.- (From the Manches- ter Examiner) A gentleman, aged 30, of good appearance and affection- ate disposition, desires a matrimonial alliance with a domes- ticated lady, possessing an annual income of about £ 400.— Particulars in strict confidence to G. G. &c. "Wanted, by a widower (bond fide), a well-brought up and educated young lady or widow, between 24 and 30, to take charge of his small establishment and family, with a view to matrimony.-Address, with or without carte de visite," &c. A young gentleman (29), of respectable family, is desirous of corresponding with a thoroughly domesticated female with a view to matrimony.—Address, in confidence, enclosing carte de visite (which will be honourably returned if not ap- proved of). C. J. M. &c. To ladies.-A gentleman of position, In the prime of life, is desirous of meeting with a lady in similar circumstances, with a view of marriage; the Continent, if agreeable, would be their chief residence; the strictest privacy may be relied on; cartes exchanged before an interview.—AddreM, in first instance," &c. Tiiz GOLDEN ORIOLE.—Mr. Edward Hearle Rodd writes from Penzance, April 23 It may interest some of your readers to know that a large number of thepe fine-plum aged birds have immigrated to this district and the Scilly Isles during the last few days. Those I have seen were in the most brillIant adult plumaue. A large fl >ck, estimated at 40, were flashed in a large thick covert at Trevethoe, near Hayle, and out of another flock of eight five were obtained. I received a notice by the packet from Scilly to-day that four were seen together on the Trescoe Abbey road another seen on "Sampson" Isle, and others at St. Mary's. The female, in very fine adult plumage, when plaoed by the side of a male, appears considerably larger. SINKING OF THE ANDAMAN ISLANDS.— In a recently issued report on the vegetation of the Andaman Islands, Mr. Kurz. the curator of the herbarium of the Calcutta Botanical Gardens, gives it as his opinion that these islands are in a (■inking state, and mmt eventually disappear. Mr. Kurz, however, has made an estimate which will relieve the superintendent of the settlement, and the 6,000 odd convicts under his charge, of any present fear of a deluge for he assumes that if the process of submersion proceeds at the rate he expects, namely, of one foot in 100 years, it will take 1,000 years before all the stores and houses along the beach at Ross Island disappear under water. Mr. Kurz is not without a reason for the faith that is in him, and seems to have arrived at this conclusion from having observed, at various points of the islands, a vast extent of decaying vegetation, stumps of trees, &c., covered by, or open to the action of, the sea. A RUFFIANLY SOLDIER.- Yesterday evening (says Indian Public Opinion of the 25th of March) a little boy met his death near the Laboree gate in a most shameful manner. In the catal cut which runs past the city some native children were busy amusing themselves picking uo the flowers which floated down to them from the bathing ghats above, and which were caught at the bridge. Some European soldiers passed over the bridge, and one. thinking to play a practical joke on the boys, went behind a poor little fellow, about «x years old, on the edge of the bridge and toppled him over. Unfortunately, the bed of the canal, for the most part. shallow, deepens there into a pool, and the child being out of his depth waa carried at once under the bridge. After some delay he was got out, but died immediately after. It might be expected that a European soldier having committed such a painful mistake would have been the first to try to rectify it by atttmpting a rescue. It gives us much pain to record that be did nothing of the sort, but instantly ran away, and being followed by an indignant crowd made the most violent efforts to escape. He ran through the gardens to the Moree gate, where the constables managed to overpower him, not however without being severely wounded by the buckles on his belt which he uted vigorously. He has been handed over to the military authorities. A SHARK SrORy.-While the barque Arabella was on her passage home from Trinidad a shark was observed following the vessel. The shark-hook was immediately baited and thrown over the side, and the shark was immediately caught. As u-ual in sueh cases, the mate essayed to pass a hitch over the back of the animal, when he fell over overboard, and in his fall caught hold of the back of the shark. The master sprang overboard to the assistance of the mate and in the midst of the struggle which ensued the shark got clear off the hook, but fortunately the master and mate were drawn promptly on board, or the shark might have had the best of the business. MR. SOTHKRN'S VARIATION OF AN OLD SCENE. —During the recent visit of Mr. Sothern to Edinburgh he was asked out to dinner by the officers of the 17th Lancers. Before the wine was cleared off the table the officers pressed Mr. Sothern to perform a part of one of his characters, which, of course, he very naturally declined. They continued, however, to press him so much that he reluctantly consented, and commenced the drunken scene from "David Garrick," when to the astonishment of all present he swept the cloth clean off the table, smashing glasses, decanters, plates, &c., wholesale. AN EXCITING TIGER HUNT.—Quite a "thrilling" incident occurred in the course of Mr. Morris's recent tiger-slaying expedition to Ma?aowd (says an Indian paper). The hunting party, consisting of Mr. Morris and someof his friends, arrived, mounted on elephants, at the lair of the man-eater and on the first appear- ance of a stripe our officiating commissioner, with his customary skill, put in a well-directed bullet from his bone-crusher. This, however, instead of cowing, enraged the brute, and made him turn to show fight. The whole of the elephants ran like rabbits, but Mr. Morris's one, being the best trained and pluckiest of the lot, was, after a little encouragement, induced to face the foe. The tiger came on so rapidly that before Mr. Morris was ready to fire again the brnte had time to make a tremendous spring on the elephant. On this Mr. Morris drew a heavy hunting-knife and almost severed the tiger's Hfead from his body before the animal let go his hold and fell to the ground. Another bullet gave him his quietus as he lay. Mr. Morris's coolness and presence of mind at such a momentous crisis is all the more striking and praiseworthy when we take into consideration that his movements were much hampered by a native servant, who clung to him in a fit of the most abject terror. We have some mighty hunters in these parts, but not one of them will dispute Mr. Morris's claims to being the Nimrod, par excellence, of this province. DUEL AT TUNIS.—A Tunis letter mentions that a duel has just taken place in that port between a lieutenant of the Duca di Genova frigate of the Italian navy, and M. B-, writer of a communica- tion to the Corriere di Sardigne, containing some of- fensive remarks on the behaviour of the officers of that vessel when ashore. These latter drew lots for one to represent them, and the hazard designated Mr. V of Genoa. j'The encounter came off in a garden, and resulted in the offender receiving two wounds, slight in themselves, but sufficient to necessitate the termination of the combat.-Galignani. A DANGEROUS TRICE.—William Giliard, a youth of 16, employed by Messrs. Humfries, carpet manufacturers, Kidderminster, did a rash trick one afternoon last week. Some goods were being drawn up the front of a warehouse by a rope and pulleys, when Gillard thoughtlessly seized the end of the rope and allowed himself to be drawn up. He was soon too high to relinquish his hold with safety, and as the person winding up the rope did not see his position the unfortunate youth was drawn higher and higher. When he reached the level of the third etorey he was too ex- hausted to retain his hold any longer, and, relaxing his prasp, fell to the ground with a most violent concussion. The fall was enough to have killed him on the spot, but he was alive, thongh seriously injured. He was re- moved to the local in firmary, when it was found that he had sustained a fracture of the base of the skull, both bones of his left fore-arm were broken, and he was severely bruited. MR. C IRLYLB ON EMIGRATION.—The following extract of a letter received from Mr. Carlyle, on the emigration question, was recently r«ad_ it, the course of a debate in one of the Australian Legislatures The subject used to be of earnest-almost painful-tnte- rest to me in old years. It seemed that no nation ever had such glorious opportunities of c latiging its nearly intolerable curses and choking nightmares into blessings and winged angels as Great Britain by colonizing, or was so scandalously throwing said opportunities away. I have aince learnt that Great Britain will go on with parliamentary palaver, &c., were the Day of Judgment close at hand, and turn a deaf ear to all considerations of that or the like kind, and so I have dropped the speculation long ago, and it lies quite dead in me." • THE PROPOSED OHANGE IN RAILWAY TAXA- TION.-A return which has been issued shows the effect of the change in railroad taxation proposed in the Budget. To the public purse the result will be substantially the same as if the present 5 per oent, duty on passenger fares were reduced to 4 per cent.; TO the companies the results will be different. Supposaog the same traffic as in 1869, the North-Eastern will in future have to bear aq increase 01 taxation to the amount of above £10,000 a year the Great Xastern will have its taxation reduced by above jE10,000 a year. The Caledonian will have its taxation increased by £(,800 a year; the Midland by £3.770; the Man- chester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire, jE3,000 a year. As the total of the taxation is reducedjthe gains, of course, outweigh the losses. The Southeastern will p»y less taxation than at present by B22,000 a year; the South- Western, also, will gain nearly £22,000 ¡the London and North Western and the Brighton above B18 000; the Great Western above £17,000; the Metropolitan, £ 9,000; the Chatham and Dover, £ 7,000; the Great Northern, £ 6,000; and the Bristol and Exeter, £ 4,000. The total taxation is reduced by rather more than a fifth of its present amount; but such is the change in 7be incidence of the impost that the taxation of the North.E,stern, the Caledonian, aud the Manchester and Sheffield will btt increased by more than one- third, while tha taxation of the South-Western and the Brighton will be reduced to less than half its pre- se^. amount, and that of the Metropolitan to 1^'s than a third of the amount now paid, and the South-Eastern nearly as much. THE DIVORCE COURT.—The Court f jt Divoree and Matrimonial Causes was estabiishtd by an Act passed no longer ago than in 1857, and already six Act a to amend it have been round necesssrv. Lord Pen- zance has laid before the House of Lords a bill to con- splidatethis part of the statute law by repealing fill thtse Act", aud arranging in a new Act in better order the enactments 111 force upon the subject. The hill contains nicety-three clauses. The first thirty-four are devoted to the constitution and powers of the Court; the next thirty-three to the rehef aff rded by the Court—judicial separation, protection orders for deserted wives, dissolution of marriage, with clauses relating te alimony, settlements, and custody of children; the last 26 clauses embody the statutory provisions relating to procedure. AN ENGLISH PICKPOCKET ABROAD.—The cor- rectional Ttibunal of Tours has jaat tried two Eng- lishmen, named Golt and Hill, for picking pockets in 1 T t0JTn d?riDg the late BitciDgs Of the High Court of Justice. They appear to have made acquaintance at Marseilles, and to have travelled in company to Tours. Golt admitted that he had tried the pockets of several ladies in the church, and had abstracted a porte-monnaie which was seized on him, but the other prisoner denied all knowledge of the theft, and declared that he had believed his companion to be a respectable man. A letter found on the latter showed that he had shortly before received a sum of 12,000f. from his friends in England, but he had lost a Iurf; of it in gaming at Monaco. The Court sen- tenced Golt to six months' imprisonment, but ac- quitted Hill. THE GAME LAWS.—A meeting of the Hamp- shire Chamber of Agriculture was held on Monday, at Fordingbridge, under the presidency of Mr. Beach. M.P. It was resolved— "That, in the opinion of this Chamber, the time has ar- rived when, in consequence of the completely-altered s'ate of the country, some means should be adopted for checking the great evil of the over-preservation of game." A second resolution was also adopted by a large majority to the effect, that in any future legislation it ought to be declared that ground game should be the property of the tenant, and winged game the property of the landlord, any agreement to the contrary not- withstanding. AN ANECDOTE OF GENERAL THOMAS.—Among the stories told of General Thomas is one of an inci- dent which occurred when he and his chief of staff, General Garfield, were inspecting the fortifications of Chattanooga in 1863. They heard a shout, Hello, mister You I want to speak to you and General Thomas found that he was the person addressed by an uncouth backwoods, East Tennessee soldier. He stopped, and the dialogue which ensued was as fol- lows :—" Mister, I want a furlough." On what grounds do you want a furlough, mv man ?" I want to go home and see my wife." How 1. ng since you Faw lour wife?" "Ever since I enlisted, nigh on to three months. "Three months r' g')od.naturedly; "Why, my good man, I haven't seen my wiie for three years." The East Tennessean stopped whittling for a moment, and stared incredulously at length he said, "Well, you see, me and my wife ain't that kind." Even General Thomas's grimness was not proof against the laughter which he rode away to conceal, leaving the astonished soldier without an answer. CONVENTUAL INSTITUTIONS.—The number of nuns in Great Britain has been stated by Mr. Newde- gate and others to amount to 6,000. This is an ex- aggeration, and a very considerable one—says the Weekly Register, and thus continues The number of convents in England amounts to 216, and in Scotland to 17—total 233; and the total number of pro- fessed nuns and lay sisrers (not including novices) amounts to rather more than 2,600, or less than half the number stated by those who are arsulng in favour of a parliamentary committee of Inquiry. We susntct that in the very liberal statement of 6,000 nuns Mr. Newdeaate has included not only the novices who are in the various convents to try their vocation, but also the young ladies, and even the poor school girls, who are in someof the religious hon: es 1er education. But these, even if we include the unfortunate women who are being reclaimed in some of our convents, would not make the number up to 6,000. Of the 216 convents in England there are not more than 20 that belong to cloistered wtders and amongst the 17 religious honses in Scotland there is only one convent that is cloistered. On Suudpy, at St. George's Roman Catholic Cathedral, Southwark. and at most of the metropolitan Reman Catholic Churches, the congregations were invited to pray, during the ensuing week, that the threatened act of injustice and insnlt levelled at the Roman Catholic religious communities through the proposed inspection of conventual and monastic institutions, may be averted. THE IDEA OF THE PLEBISCITE;.—"We have re- ceived the following- curious story from a source en- titled to respect (says Le Gaulois) A. cordir g to our informant, the iirst i lei of ti e Plebiscite originated neither in the mind cf M. Ollivier nor in that of th& Emperor, nor even in that of M. Rouher. The Emoeror, it is averted, has kept up since his residence in England very intimate and confidential relations with a certain person whose advice hI. has been in the habit of taking in all difficult ca ea during his reign. In the late crisis, disquieted at the turn taken by omestic politics, he it stated to have had recourse once again to his private confidant, and it is at this person s suggestion that the Imperial decision was taken to appeal directly to the French people. The reasons which debar us from writing the name which is on our hps may be readily comprehended. THE MABQDTS OF Euu's LIBHRALITY.- The Times' Correspondent, writing from Rome, amongst other gossip narrates the following :— The Marquis of Bute has left after a long and I should think to him a costly season. Among other instance* of his liberality, one hr.s much gratified many kind people. is a Mies Lewis here, a scutptreso of merit, born in a wigwam-, her mother a red Indiau, her father a negro In common with several score brothers and sisters of the craft she hat been without orders this season, or, if with an order or hrO without ready money. A sculptor has to pay ront for a studio, wages to workpeople, and immense sums for marbln »h;c> sometimes turns out good for nothing when it ii cut LTto- Their own personal expenses may betriaicg. but they al»ay* have friends. The Marquis has not only ordered a MadolJvlJo from Miss Lowix, to be a copy of one now ift the workmen's hands, but alao paid herprompttyfor it, and so relieved thl' poor girl from some embarrassment. I hrpn this will nel draw upon him a crowd of canvassers, representing I tear, equal claims and equal need s. The Marqtt's is by no meaJI" so rich as people supposed. With a large but speculative income, he started with a large debt, and has had to borro* i more. He is no w on board his jacht, and is to spend his nex& T winter In Scotland. THE BELGIAN TROPMANN.—The Journal de Lieg6 states that the King of the Belgians has commuted tne capital sentence pronounced against Dessons-le* Monstier into hard labour for life. This criminal bad, as may be remembered, murdered three cattle-dealer*. brothers, and buried them in his court-yard, and had poisoned his own wife. No doubt whatever existed to his guilt, and the only motive for the present ac( of mercy is to be found in the repugnance of Leopold II. to sign a death warrant. R"COVERY OF MONEY SPENT fOR DRINK.— A Michigan woman has recovered by law all the money that her husband had spent in a liquor saloon for years. The prohibitory liquor law of that State d, not regard liquor as "property," and the recovered the money on the ground that it had beeØ paid to the liquor vendor without consideration. Aftet this verdict gets to be well understood throughout tb« State (says a Baltimore paper), very few m'jn will b* to undertake the., etailliql10t traffic wltbm Its lUll1t3. AN INDIAN STOET.-General Peasant on tell* an -amusing Indian story. He was otce, while .t* tioned on a frontier post, surrounded by threatening bands of Cheyennes, with whom he wished to nS? • treaty, but they were too suspicious or hS S place themselves m his power. At last he succeeded in capturing a young Indian of rank, whom he heíJ as a hostage. One day this captive, sullenly ■talking! about the fort came upon a soldier who for waat oJ better amusement, was playing with a child's mtLnivt 'v \°m' HJdescanpH f Ve?tln#lsV leaPed 411 obstruction* WTNR,? LN- A 8HORT HOWEVER, nereturntd, heading a deputation of chiefs, who, aftef'i pending an hour or so in rapt contemplation of th** jumping jack, held a solemn council and negotiated- the desired treaty, stipulating as the most important condition, that the marvellous little toy should alwaT* remain at the fort. WASTE LAND IN NEW ZEALAND.—The OtsuO' Government have set aside 100,000 acres of Preservation Inlet, West Coast, as a si e for ^settle- ment (says the New Zealand Examine Th* ground is being^ raP1dly taken up. The settle- ments at Martin s Bay and Preservation Inlet formed under a special Act. Under this Act *4* °f^° ^rnment empowered to leake d grants of 100 acres to any person above fifteen yean of ^7WN0NDL'10U 0F AT ^TWO *EAR6'<*C>IPATL thSd v^fTK to be ^daVhe Oration of th* third year; the party having, however, the option of purchase at 10s. a,n acre after the firt-t year, if they de' P* V .,7he quality to be disposed of in this & each settlement, Mai tin s Bay aDd Preservation Inlet,' Hot to exceed 10,000 acivp. A second class, Amounting to 30,000 acres at each fetutairient, ill op<aa for f.aie a 5s. per acre and a third class, 60,000 aores, at an nc set price of 5s. at ptihlic auction, or at 10g if fn]A privately; the holdm -R under t'rla class by anv onP person being restricted to 50Q aeres. J '•' FRIEITO ■ w COHWB-A genealogical ooo- temporary remarks v;p^>n the numerous instances in kht present House cf Commons ot tw0 or more me £ 4 belonging to ihe same family, Thia th^ wrXr L serves, can ro longer arise pr0D^ef„ but probably more tban iver frotu the of wealthy families, euher territorial or m«rw f'raI^ certain districts, Something abo muat be intile, not so muc^o hereditary geniwB as tothf .attribut*j tbe great political talent* of a statesir lr;fluence o* mending others who the same • "an la recoBV Thus Mr. Gladf-tua,, Mr Pr;!u iiame and blood; ton their faatlj Abercorn viyajs the lat« *> • and the Duke 0 of U.I-<T«l,V ICCEFE JConnell in the ee viz IV w^3ch contribute wilham, Gr vsvcnor' HajvV- Cavendish, TTi'#' ohild, and Vivian, Tn /» Lowther, Iv.tW are represented, and l8even father and so** brothers. In f&ot th are twenty-on* pairs o no leas than 101 ar .ere are 1D the Houne of blood with other who are clostly iJJ; other. I