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49ur IMwt Corrtspoittat.

THE VOLUNTEER REVIEW AT BRIGHTON.

[No title]

DEPARTURE OF EMIGRANTS.

BANQUET TO MR. GEORGE HUDSON.

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BANQUET TO MR. GEORGE HUDSON. The inhabitants of Sunderland gave a public dinner to Mr. George Hudson, the ex-railway king, on Saturday ni$ht The Mayor presided and the dinner was attended by Earl Vane, Mr. C*ndiHh, M.P., Messrs. Laing and Hudson, of the Wear Commissioners, Mr. Hugh Taylor, and many of the principal merchants and traders of the town. The Mayor, in proposing the health of Mr. Hudson, said that the north country owed a deep debt of grati- tude to George Hudson. Cut for him the resources of the north would never have been developed as they had been. He referred especially to the projection of Jarrow and Sunderland Docks and the High Level Bridge. Mr. Hudson, in replying, was greatly cheered. He thanked the company for the enthusiastic manner in which they had received him. He said it was thirty years since circumstances placed him in a position of being able to render services to the town in the projec- tion of different enterprizes. When he first entered the district it possessed two millions of railway property which was not remunerative but he was enabled by some foresight to place these railways ina profitab'e posi- tion. GeorgeStepnensonnevertookany partinany great work in the district without doing him the honour of consulting him. Mr. Hudson referred to the offers made to him to carry the railway communication some miles from Newcastle, but he persevered and succeeded in carrying it through that town. The next work which he was connected with in the district was Sunderland Dock. He had been told that he had j obbed that dock but this he indignantly denied, and said he felt that Sunderland, as well as Newcastle, required faculties for developing its trade. At that time he had the monopoly of the district in his hands, and he was offered thousands of pounds, but he never touched for himself a single shilling. Many of his projects which wero condemned at the time had since been carried out; among those was the Jarrow Dock, for which he entered into the contrac1". He would not say where the credit had been taken for carrying out what had been such immense benefit to the district. It was satisfactory to know that the projects which he felt necessary for the trade of the district had been carried out literally and entirely. He claimed for himself the credit of being the first to adopt that which had been of the greatest advantage to railways, viz. amalgama- tion, which was first suggested by him to the Midland and Derby, and Birmingham, and which was further carried out in the purchase of numerous branch lines in thenorih, which were dead bodies, but which after- wards became living souls. He would not say that he had notauffered, but he had always preserved his courage, and in his deepest distress some kind friend always dropped in and helped and cheered him on his way. Sunderland always stood firmly and kindly by him. He referred to the great progress made by Tyne, and urged Sunderland and the towns of the Wearto imitate her example. He next referred to the successful man- ner in which he opposed the introduction of the atmo- spheric system between Newcastle and Berwick. If that system had been introduced, and all their money spent upon it, it would have been many years before they would have got the locomotive. He initiated the amalgamation of Newcastle and Carlisle with the North Eastern, and leased it at 7 per cent.. but it had since paid dividends of 9i and 10 per cent. This showed that the principles he laid down were right, and it was unjust to repudiate the agreement for which he suf- fered pecuniarily. Many of the charges made against him were now almost antiquated. It was of no use speaking of them now. When the hurricane blew over him he was not heard, and could only bow his head and allow it to pass, but he con- scientiously asserted that he never supported a pro- ject which he did not believe to be right. He had had thousands and thousands at his feet; he might have recouped himself by buying shares of railways he recommended to amalgamate, but he did not, and he now wondered at his moderation. He, no doubt, had committed errorf, but they were those of the head, and not of the heart. When he purchased some lines be had to spend large sums in restocking them, and he charged this to capital. It was laid against him that he paid dividends out of capital, but this he had since frequently heard was the correct principle. After all the miserable straining of matters against him. out of dividends of a million and three quarters, only fifty thousand was claimed to be overpaid. Mr. Hudson entered at considerable length into the explanation and d^«»nce of a contract for rails which he afterwards sold (York and Berwick) below the market price, and which he had to repay. He contended that the policy of law in those extreme cases was bad. In oonclusion he ex- pressed the hope that the rest of his life would be spent in peace and enjoyment. Mr. Hudson resumed his seat amidst loud and hearty cheers.

THIEVES' SUPPER.

[No title]

THE COLLECTION OF TAXES.

DEATH OF PROFESSOR MAGNUS.

BABOO KESHUB CHUNDER SEN.

:GOOD FRIDAY IN THE EAST-END…

DEATH OF THE DUCHESS OF BERRI:

THE UNIVERSITY BOAT RACE.

CHARGE AGAINST A BOY OF THIRTEEN.

AMENDMENT OF THE GAME LAWS.

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