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DISSOLUTION OF A VOLUNTEER-T…

"THE YOUNG MAN OF THE DAY."

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DEATH OF THE PRINCE ROYAL…

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THE BISHOP OF CARLISLE ON…

THE NORWICH MURDER.

THE BALLOT TEST AT MANCHESTER.

SHOCKING DEATH OF A YOUNG…

THE RITUALISTS AND THE PRIVY…

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THE RITUALISTS AND THE PRIVY COUNCIL JUDGMENT. The monition following the recent judgment of the Privy Council in "Martin v. ?\1ackonochie" having been served, the time has come for the defendant and all who have rendered themselves obnoxious to the law as now interpreted to decide upon their future line of conduct. Accordingly, the worshippers at St. Alban's, Holborn, London, on Sunday, received an address by the perpetual curate ot St. Alban's to his parishioners, stating his view of the circumstances arising out of the judgment, and of his duty thereon. Mr. Mackunocliie'a address begins :— My dear parishioners and friends,-I mmt lay wmething to you to-day about the wrong—the most oppressive wrung- which has been done to us. I am not going to say hard things about those who hne done this wrong, It is very easy for tho:e who have strong prejudices, with not much knowledge and with little love, to do a great wrong and flatter themselves that they are asserting a great truth. I doubt not that it is so now. Still, there stands the wrong. In thQ face of English justice-the almost absurd impartiality of which is, to its honour, a bye-word ova the whole world -i], judgment has been pronounced, which dues not declare law, hut overrides, on the showing of il sown arguments, even statute law, in order to make a law sg linst us." I say against us. Xo doubt the judgment was me ait hy those who began the suit to he agalllat our bles¡¡e,1 Lord in that which is dearest to Him—the Sacrament of His Divine Love but by the good providencs of our God lIpon us, the counsel of Aliit iphel has been turned to foolishness, and the blow has fallen upon us. Mr. Mackonochie then proceeded to explain why he proposes to obey a judgment which is so illegal. The church a.nd state are in alliance. The state courts have made decisions on church matter?. This leaves the law of the latter just where it was, although within its own province-i, e" for civil purposes-the decisioll 01 the state court is of furce, The law of the ehurch sanctioned the pract;ces which have heen attacked before the suit began; it sanctious them st 11. Tliev are just as much (lur heritage anti our right as Kuglish catholics now as they were ûlJÛ years ago. We thought that they were also our right as Enlllish citizens, by the law of the state. We are told that thoy are not. We are convinced that the decision is eimply oppressive, and so, most likely, are a large number of our countrymen, who care nothing about the things them- selves but we obey. The practices forbidden are part in- deed of the right of the church but they are not nec#ssary for the validity of her ordinancies. They are, no doubt, most closely connected with the" dignity of that Holy Sacrament," but do not constitute its essence. If there be a priest, and bread and wine, in a garret or cellar, there may be the blessed Sacrament. The Chris'ian church has seen a priest pinioned to the ground celebrate the divine mysteries with his own breast for his altar, with his prison garments for vestments, and in the absence of all other adjuncts. The" church law permits and claims as its right that which a harsh and novel interpretation of the state law has now forbidden. We are contented to forego for a while our rights as church- men, rather than seem to disobey as citizens. Mr. Mackonochie then went over the several points ruled against him, complaining most of the prohibition to use lighted candles during the celebration of the Communion, and then proceeds :— Now the injustice which you and I feel in all this is that we should be interfered with in so unprovoked a manner. We have never sought to force any unwilling protestant to cou/e to our services. In no case, as far as I know, has any attempt been made to force protestants to do what the Prayer-book tells them to do. All round London are hosts of churches in which the Rubric is broken: no daily service no saints' day service no notice given of festival or fast; no Litany on Wednesday or Friday; the Athanasian Creed omitted the Holy Communion not administered to each severally the marriage service mutilated the Sacrament of Holy Baptism sold for is. Gd., by authority of the Diocesan Register; and, worse than all the miserable profanation most unwittingly, I believe, in most cases, perhaps in all, but not less truly so) ot evening communions. Then bishops—perhaps even the Archbishop of York—habitually offending, not only in re- gard of these or some of these instances, but also by administer- ing the rite of confirmation to candidates by the dozen. Nearly all these, as well as countless less or greater matters, are violations of plain rubrical directions, and are the greatest passible abominations to us. but we have never stirred a finger to interfere, nor do we mean to do so. If half the parishioners of those parishes who are groaning and pming for better things were to press their grievances, it is hard to see how any court could refuse to enforce com- pliance with express rules. But these "aggrieved parishioners find other vent for their sorrows, and either endure in patience, or seek elsewhere for a church in which to pray; while their "painful minister" is taking his ease at home, or working in self-chosen ways. hy, then, you are all asking, should we be disturbed, when we do not wish to disturb others? I cannot tell you, unless I have given the answer already in the fact that the church triumphs through weakness. Mr. Mackonochie then stated the manner in which the ceremonial will in future be modified at St. Alban's. When the decision of the Court of Arches was delivered, he discontinued the ceremonial mixing of the water with the wine, and all use of incense. He was aware that in regard of incense, he was doing more than the judgment required but finding the old use forbidden, he preferred this course to any other, in order that he might have time to consider in what other way he could best use it without running counter to the judgment. He has now come to the conclusion that the best plan will be fthat the church should be ensed on the days when there is to be a high celebra- tion, before each of the services beginning at 7, 8, 9, and 10.30, and also before evensong. As regards the posture of the priest during the celebration, he will stand throughout, the consecration prayer. This of course does not affect the congregation. The candles will not be lighted. He takes this opportuniry of stating that he hila just had a present made him of seven lamps for the sanctuary. He has long wished to have them, since he saw them in some churches where they have been used for many years. It is true that they are of Eastern rather than Western authority; but they so strikingly re- mind us of the seven lamps of fire in the Revelation, burning before the throne, and which are "the Seven Spirits of God," that this objection at once falls to the ground. Moreover, they cannot be in any way mis- taken for a violation of the judgment: inasmuch as they are not themselves ornaments in the technical "euse and their use is not ceremonial, as they will burn continually, night and day. In yielding obedience to a judgment, however unfair, it is right and manly to yield entirely. He wishes, therefore, that they should clearly understand that these lamps are no kind of substitution for the two lights on the Communion- table," nor any way meant as an evasion of the judg- ment. But his dear friends will see that there is much for them to do. In the first place, they must continue the three prayers which he asked them to say at the beginning of their troubles the collect for third Sunday in Lent (for protection) the collect for Quin- quagesima (for charity) and a third (for their opponents). 0 merciful God, who hast made all men, and hatest nothing that Thou hast made, nor wouldest the death of a sinner, but ra'her that he should be converted and live, have mercy upon all those who seek to withstand Thy truth, or to rob Thy worship of its beauty. ) ake from them all ignorance, hardness of heart, and contempt of Thy word, and so fill them with the knowledge of Thee and of Thy love, that they may be saved among the residue of Thy people through Jesus Christ our Lord." Amen. After which they will say the Lord's Prayer, combining the intentions of the three collects. Further they are to increase their own acts of reverence, and to take more care than ever that they are free from ostentation and from self-pleasing. Mr. Mackonochie further said :— I do not want grotesque attitudes, or prostrations, but to se > yon careful never to cross the church when the hlessed sacrament is present without genufLctil1g, and never to genuflect when it is not there If yon come up the nave for communion, to see you very quietly and reverently genuflect Oil leavillg your seat, on entering the chancel, and again on leaving the altar. To see the sign of the cross made in like manner, before receiving the Holv Communion in each kind, and before leaving the altar, also at the end of the c-'et-ds, and I, G\nry be to God on histli," at the absolution and b e-smg, and at the" Glory be to TilPe, 0 God," before the iJo.-pel, on the foieliead, lips, and breast, But above all, rc-member that these outward things must be the shining forth of the inward light, or they will be simply mockeries. Our Lord has all .wed His enemies to insnlt Him by putting out the symbolical lights just as, in His pass on he deigned to suffer, uot only the great torments of scourge, and cross, and crown of thorns, Ullt also the smiting on the face, the spitting, and many other such lesser affronts. Mr. Mackonochie's final exhortation is :— God has called you to take part in the great work of giving back to the Church of England that. "Worship in Spirit and in Trutu of which more than two centuries of cold unloving Protestantism have robbed her. You will need patience— patience with your opponents, lest you lose f.ove—patience witl1 your friends, lest you hreak up your forccs-patlenc9 ab> vc all with yourselves, l,;st YJU joie hpart you must be p ,tie:,t at home :111<1 patient m soe'ety patient in discussion and patient lunier abuse—but, with all your patience, bold, out-tp ken, determined, for your cause is the cause of God a id of His Christ. You may live to see only defeat do not mind it, your lives, and your deaths too, in the midst of defeat, will have done their work for God, and those who come after will find the remarks which y >u shall have left for good upon the Bnilding of that Heavenly cIty which is the Bride of the Lamb. At the end of the sermon and the offertory, during the collection of which a sequence" or some versicle was sung, the "high celebration" proceeded, the whole, or nearly the whole, of the congregation re- maining in their places. The exhortation beginning "Dearly beloved in the Lord" was omitted; and pauses were left in the prayer for the Church Militant to enable the congregation to pray more especially for all Bishops," "for all them who are in trouble, (sorrow, need, sickness, or any other ad- versity," and "for all God's servants departed this life in His faith and fear." The absolution was given hy Mr. Mackonochie in due form with the sign of the cross but with the Prayer of Consecration the service relapsed into dumb show. Mr. Mackonochie stood with his back to the congregation, throughout, and instead of rising the paten and chalice on high above his head, he raised them to about the level of his mouth, and although he conformed literally and strictly to the monition with which he had been served as to the priest not kneeling after the consecration, yet he made at inter- vals some five or six genuflexions, to which his attendant deacon and sub-deacon contrived to add one, or possibly two, more on their own account. Whether he mixed water with the wine in the chalice the writer of this does not know, as the chancel is deep and the congregation are too far off to see such minutiae but we gather from an address to his parishioners which Mr. Mackonochie has published that it he did so at all he did not do it ceremonially." Having communicated himself, he proceeded to administer the sacred elements; about 12 or 15 men, and perhaps twice as many of what the Roman service book calls the devout female sex," communicated also, while the organ played as before, and other versicles were sung. As the bread, or rather the wafer, and the wine were administered to each person, Mr. Mackonochie and his deacon made the sign of the cross, and the service ended in the usual manner, except that while the officiating clergy were "reverently" consuming, according to the Rubric, the unconsecrated bread and wine, some more versicles were sung by the choir. The congregation included apparently a very large number ef the upper class of tradesmen. Here and there were a bonnet and a dress unmistakQably from Tyburnia or Belgravia but it is clear that the services at St. Alban's are found to be attractive to great num- bers of the middle class, and apparently they are more popular with the men than even with the women. At all events on Sunday there were more men than women among the worshippers. Among them were country clergymen and country gentlemen, and more than one member of Parliament; while at the bottom of the church sat the celebrated Father Ignatius in his monastic dress. If any remark should be made as to the paucity of aotual communicants in a well-filled church which must hold some thousand persons, it should be remem- bered that there are at St. Alban's two or three early celebrations," at which it is more than probable that some of the mid-day congregation had communicated already.

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A PAINFUL MATTER.

A HARD CASE.

PARSON BROWNLOW'S PLATFORM!

ELECTION EXPENSES.

A KNOTTY POINT!!

MURDEROUS OUTRAGE IN SARAWAK,

DR. VAUGHANAND THE BISHOPS…

THE WILD BEASTS OF THE SEA.

A GENTLE HINT!

THE PHYSICAL EDUCATION OF…

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THE MARKETS.