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IAPPOINTMENT OF A .POLICE-SERGEANT…

! TO CORRESPONDENTS. ~

THE TOWN" PROPERTY.

PETTY SESSIONS (SPECIAL) -ABER;…

,"-'','"II'",.i-v j " COUNTY…

TOWN COMMISSIONERS; ABERYSTWYTH.

[No title]

j¡.,\,,',.. '"PHTTY SESSIOTSS,…

GOGERDDAN ANNUAL PLOUGHING…

GOGERDDAN RENT AUDIT.

[No title]

THE TOWN HALL.

CHAMBERS OF AGRICULTURE.

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CHAMBERS OF AGRICULTURE. In a country like our own, where so large a portion of the soil is devoted to purposes of agriculture, and where so runny millions of the inhabitants have indirect connection with agri- cultural pursuits, it is matter of surprise that chambers of agriculture are of such nipdern growth. But they have of late years been increasing in number and importance, and they no doubt will continue to do so. In their several districts each association of the kind is virtually an agricultural parliament, without the power of directly making laws, it is true, hut forming public opinion out of which our laws are formed, and developing that knowledge of agriculture which ought always to be progressive, while, at the same time each chamber of agriculture ouiiht to he the means of promoting and har- monising the mutual interests of the owners, tenants, and cultivators 01 the soil. Earl Granville has, on the whole, made a capitnl speech Oil this subject as President of the Shropshire Chamber of Agriculture, at its annual dinner the other evening. There are only two points-hut they are specially impor- tant-on which we fee) inclined to take excep- tion to this eminent statenian's remarks; or, rather, we think he missed a fine opportunity for saying what he did not say. In alluding to the several questions to which chambers of agriculture might address themselves, Lord Granville placed first the question of the tenure of land. He said that in Shropshire there were some leases ai ranged on a fair and equi- table basis, while others were simply disgrace- ful—opposed to national prosperity, to the. into rest of the landlord But his lordship said nothing about the interest of the tenant. He merely remarked that thewhoie question re- quired careful consideration on the part of both landlord and tenant—first, as to whether the extension of leases was a desirable thing; and next, if it were decided in the affirmative, as to what was the best way to adopt a gradual change. Now, with all due respect to the noble Earl, we must say that he here spoke from a landlord's point of view, as might have been expected, perhaps from a landlord(though his lordship reminds us that he does not hold much land) speaking to landlords The noble chairman, in fact, rather shirked the question. If the landlords in Shropshire or elsewhere reo fuse to grant leases, on fair conditions, they in- directly prevent that thorough cultivation of the land on which so much of the people's food depends. Where the tenant has no security ot tenure for a certain time, there is a deaden- ing weight on the spirit of enterprise which 110 mere hope of continued possession will remove. The chambers of commerce may set an ex- ample to the chambers of agriculture in respect to freedom of trade. There is nothing like free trade in farming so long as the tenant farmer has no security for a fair return on the capital he chooses to invest in the land and it cannot be said that farmers, as a body, have this security so long as the system of leases is not universal, and arrangements for compensa- tion placed on something like an uniform basis. On the subject of the game laws, too, Lord 1"GranViJle missed some of the more important points. He was very humourous about the fertility of rabbits, remarking that, with the exception of poor hard-working curates of the Established Church, rabbits were the most prolific animals in the world. These laws have always been a source of heart-burning and ill- will, and even of crimes of violence innumer- able, within the memory of theoldest among us. There is some little argument on the game- preserving landlord's side, but the overwhelm- ing balance of argument is against the game laws as they now exist. In all other respects Earl Granville's speech, we think, was admirable. He points out the good work that chambers of agriculture have to do in a variety of ways. They can collect and disseminate information as to the best methods of sewage and drainage, the proper treatment ofcattte in reference to the insiduous cattle-plague, and generally on all subjects: affecting the culture of the soil; and, above all, they can promote education- not so much agricultural education as the education of the children of those engaged in agriculture. He might have added, too, that chambers of agri- culture could do something towards promoting uniformity in weights and measures used for farm produce, the variety in this matter being anything but charming. There is, indeed, an immense amount of work for agricultural cham- bers to do, and not the least is to assert the im- portance of the agricultural interest, seeing that the tendency in a country whose popula- tion so rapidly increases as does our own is towards the development of towns and com- merce, and the throwing of land out of cul- tivation.

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LLANILAR.

VOTE BY BALLOT.

COUNTY COURT PRACTICE.

LLANBADARN-FAWR CHURCH.

THE TOWN HALL.

STREET NUISANCE. »

[No title]

REVIEWS.

H U NTIN GA PPOIN T MEN TST

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