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MURDER AND SUICIDE.

SINGULAR CAUSE OF SUDDEN DEATH.

EXECUTION OF BROWN, AT LEWES.

A SCENE AT A RAILWAY STATION.

VERDICT FOR THE PLAINTIFF.

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AN UNFORTUNATE MARRIAGE.

SPEECH OF THE EMPEROR NAPOLEON.

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A LOVER STEALS THE DEAD BODY…

PLENTY OF ROOM IN THE WIDE…

A YANKEE VISIT TO TENNYSON.

A HINT TO PUBLISHERS.

FEMALE EDUCATION. -

A BARBAROUS PRACTICE.

REMEDY FOR SCARLATINA AND…

FACTS RELATIVE TO THE SUEZ…

CRIME IN NEW YORK.

REMARKABLE IF TRUE.

THE BALLOT.

THE CONVICT BISGROVE AND THE…

PROTEST FROM THE PULPIT AGAINST…

A BALL ON BOARD A MAN OF WAR.

THE CURSE OF DRINK.

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THE CURSE OF DRINK. In a leader upon Pauperism, its cause and effects, The Times, remarks :— It is a fact well known to all conversant with the poor that a person may fall out of working condition to indolence and dependence very fast, yet by no means irretrievably. The power and the wish for work depend very much on the physical strength and the state of the animal spiI its. Bad air, trouble, a little excess in drink, or want of regular sleep may utterly indispose a man for work in a short time. Of course, it must be admitted that the chief cause of such tem- porary and curable indisposition is drink. As soon as a working man finds his strength and spirits flag, he takes, as he imagines, the speediest way to recruit them. A good dinner, had he even the appetite for it, would cost him a shilling or two. But sixpence will obtain for him the stimulus he craves, and which will really answer its purpose for half-an-hour. He will, too, take it in company instead of in solitude; he will find it at once, wherever he happens to be, instead of having to look for it, to wait for it, and perhaps not get it at last. The primeval curse upon the soil clings to food, even in the metropolitan cook-shop &nd eating-house, not to speak of the rural cottage. Food is always a difficulty; drink never, so long as there remains sixpence m a man's pocket. But from the hour that drink is substituted for wholesome food, the body sinks, and the spirit follows. Though far short of actual drunkenness, a man finds it impossible to apply and to exert himself as he used to do. That will be found a fair account of a very large proportion of the pauper.em which Mr. Goshen is very wisely resolved we shall be weekly reminded.

----.-0---------PREVENTION…

LETTING THE PEWS.

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THE MARKETS.