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COUNTY ELECTION. —THE NOMINATION…

. ELECTION INTELLIGENCE.

CARDIGANSHIRE ELECTION.

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CARDIGANSHIRE ELECTION. Amongst the latest of the- constituencies in the country to poll its electors: was our own county of Cardigan, the poll taking place oil last Thursday. The excitement respecting the result of the contest, which had been running high for the last three months, of course reached its culminating point of white heat on the day of the poll. From an early hour in the morning Aberystwyth presented the appearance almost of being in a state of seige. Very many of the principal shops in the town were closed, violence on the part of the roughs being, with some reason, anticipated. Up to dinner time, however, there was no disturbance further than the shcutin^ of gangs of urchins, who shouted the stereyotyped cry "Vaughan for ever," or Richards for ever" according as the voters for either candidate ap- proached the polling booths, and the throwing of mud at respectable persons, chiefly those who took a conspicuous part in the contest. Many of Mr Richards's own voters were decorated with blue rosettes, and similar rosettes were attached to the heads of the horses conveying Mr Richards's electors to the poll. Of coarse such displays were not for- gotten by Mr Vaughan's party, for the Crosswood colours floated bravely in the breeze. The special constables, sworn in the previous day to assist the police in preserving order during the hours of polling, attended at the Town-hall at half- past seven, to receive their instructions from Super- intendent Lloyd, who, dividing them into parties of ten or a dozen, assigned to each party its special district in the town. The interior of the Town-hail, where the votes were taken, was fitted up with every desire to the convenience of the voters, poll clerks, and the public generally. A- strong timber barricade was run across the middle of the hall, of just sufficient height to prevent the general concourse of spectators impeding the general business of the day, but suffi- ciently low to allow the independent non-electors an opportunity of gratifying their curiosity in watching the chief proceedings of the day. Within this barricade were erected four polling booths, one on either side of the solicitors' table, which was removed for the occasion one where the county court judge sits and the fourth immediately under—the place assigned on county CQurt'tdayg to the registrar. The returning officers who presided at each booth were- Alderman John Davies, Town (Councillor George T. Smith. j Early as the opening of the poll was-eight o'clock is an early hour to commence business on these winter mornings—coaches, carriages, and every description of trap, were conveying votes to town long before the appointed hour. The consequence was that the early hours of polling werelmsy for the officiating officers. Before the next hour was over, according to more or less random statements, Mr Richards's majority had increased threefold but before one o'clock arrived it was reported that this majority had dwindled down to something like 120. From this date the numbers fluctuated in a most tantalizing manner, and when the poll closed, at five o'clock the numbers stood thus From Tregaron, Llandyssul, and Lampeter few and far between unreliable reports reached Aberyst- wyth. At 12 o'clock it was stated that Mr Vaughan had a majority of 40 at Tregaron, and that Mr Richards had precisely the same majority at Llan- dyssul. The reports from Lampeter were of a most conflicting character, Mr Vaughan's party claiming for their chief a large majority, the Liberals claiming for Mr Richards the same. All doubts were set at rest when the gross return was received, shortly before 9 o'clock, in Aberyst- wyth, giving to Mr Richards a gross majority of 154 votes. The following were the majorities at the various polling places:— ABEBAYBON. Richards 45 ABEKTSTWYTH. Richards 219 cardigan. Richards 53 I LAMJPETER* Vaughan 119 LLANDYSSUL. Richards 28 TREGARON. Vaughan 72 191 345 Gross majority for Richards 154 The announcement was received in Aberystwyth with varied feelings of pleasure and pain—the Con- servative candidate being a gentleman held in unusual esteem, and the Liberal being the champion of the chapel party, who certainly worked with might and main in his cause. Both parties were earnest, and fonght the battle out fiercely. The adhesion of Go- gerddan to Richards' party gave a grand impetus to the latter, of which it was naturally not slow to avail itself; and the attendance of even the ladies of the IC;, ogprddan family, acting as canvassers amongst the ( crowd, went not a short way towards securing Mr Richards his majority in this district. Large as that majority was, it did not, we understand, realize the expectations of Mr Richards' friends, who expected one much larger, nor'Of Mr Richards'opponents, who held a similar faith.' The result is in no slight degree attributable to the attachment of the Cross- wood tenantry to the lord of the soil, and of the feeling of pure friendship which actuated the gentry of the district to support Mr Vaughan's claims. Great disappointment was felt on the other hand by the Conservative party in being denied majorities in other polling districts which had long been promised their nominee. Neither Tregaron nor Lampeter yielded tbe majorities that had been expected of them, whilst Aberayron, Llandyssul, and Cardigan added there numbers to the Conservative defeat. How Mr Vaughan agents at Aberayron allowed Mr Richards to obtain a majority in that district is an enigma which remains to be solved. Up to the eve of the polling day they had promised Mr Vaughan a large majority. I he case of Cardigan is not quite so surprising; butin both places either Mr Vaughan's agents woefully miscalculated their strength from the beginning, or else there must have been a rare amount of clumsiness in the arrangements which they made from bringing their voters to the poll. Of course the intemperate displays of enthusiasm common to such occasions, such as shouting gangs of boys parading the streets, were freely indulged in, but taking the proceedings on the whole, and the nature of the occasion, they went off with but few infractions of order and decorum. The battle's lost and won; Mr Vaughan has suffered defeat; Mr Richards has secured a triumph. It is the desire of every honest constituent that the successful candi- date may prove worthy of the trust which the elec- tors of Cardiganshire have reposed in him. e

VOTING FOR NEIGHBOURS.

THE CARDIGANSHIRE ELECTION.

TEMPERANCE HALL.

--------HUMANITY.

THE TOWN PLAN TENDERS.

. SWEARING IN OF SPECIAL CONSTABLES.

HOSPITAL ACCOMMODATION.

PETTY SESSIONS, LLANBADARN.

THE ATTEMPTED REVIVAL OF FENIANISM.

MR. GLADSTONE ON THE IRISH…

INCIDENTS ON THE ELECTION…

DENBIGH ELECTION.

LIFEBOAT SERVICES.

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