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, TOWN COMMISSIONERS, ABERYSTWYTH.

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THE WATER QUESTION.

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♦ PENNY READINGS.

.. ABERYSTWYTH ' LITERARY…

DEATH OF MR. LEWIS PUGH.

- PONTRHYDFENDIGAID.

THE HISTORY OF THE EXISTING…

LLYWERNOG LEAD MINE.

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OUR LONDON CORRESPONDENT.I

WRECK IN THE CHANNEL.

▼— LODGING-HOUSE BUILDING.

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THE MARKETS. --

Family Notices

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--------LOCAL-

— ♦ — POPULAR READINGS.

TREGARON.

---.----«O^ES?ONDENCS.

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«O^ES?ONDENCS. UN1VE1MTTY AND MIDDLE-CLASS EI) U- T CATION IN WALES. TO THE EDITOR OF THE ABERYSTWYTH OBSERVE 11. Sir,-To satisfy those friends of education who have been fearful that in seeking a higher type of education for the Principality we were oblivious of the pressing wants of the middle classes, permit me to make one quotation, which will have the effect of showing that educational means for these classes has always been a mark kept in view by us. The condition of things in the Principality with respect to middle-class education is at present very peculiar, and calls for the serious attention of our wisest men. The children of the poor are better educated than are the children of those next above them. British and National Schools, stimulated into efficiency by Government subsidy and inspec- tion, give the poorer classes an education, whatever its confessed defects, of a highly practical and valuable kind.- But what then? While pahlic attention has been awakened to the education of the poor, all hut entire apathy has reigned on the question of middle-class education," &c. The words are from a jiamphlet, Middle and High Schools, and a University for Wales, which I ?rlb- Ji,h('d just five years ago, and after the perusal of u hicii the late Mr W. Williams came to 1 he decision to give One Thousand Pounds to the object. In fact, the education of the middle class is a chief aim, and wiil be the chief effect of our movement. This department of culture is a paramount head of the country. Wales is, if we may so speak, a peculiarly middle-class country. The strength of every nation is beyond doubt found in what is called its middle class—a term understood by all, though perhaps capable, of definition by very few. But if this section is the most influential of the population in England, v* hen the classes of higher dignity through birth and fortune are so numerous and powerful, what must it be in Wales, where the aristocracy are comparatively few and poor, and where the lowest cia-s-the abject and destitute poor, so numerous in many countries, are fortunately also so limited. The bounds of the middle class in Wales are in truth very wide, and embrace an enormous bulk of population. Now the fact is patent, and it is of no use ignor- ing it, that for this most important and rapidly increasing section there is no systematic and per- manent educational provision. We have nothing but a few schools, excellent of.their kind, set upby private enterprize, and a good many in no sense excellent in their kind, (with one or two prominent exceptions,) called Endowed Grammar Schools, whose main service seems to be to spend in the most unremunerative way the money Jeft by our benevolent forefathers, and stand in the way of the establishment of really efficient schools. The question therefore is, What is to be done to remedy this state of things, and how is it to be accomplished? Yours truly, THOMAS NICHOLAS. 5, Gracechurch St., Londun, Feb. 18, 1808.

---THE GOGERDDAN FOXHOUNDS