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HORSE-FLESH AS AN ARTICLE…

-------------------._-DEAN…

THE MYSTERIOUS DISAPPEARANCE…

DOUBLE MURDER.

MISS MENKEN AND HER CARRIAGE.

The CAUSES of IRISH DISAFFECTION.

THE TRIALS FOR SEDITIOUS LIBELS.

-----A SCENE AT A PARIS STATE…

IRISH CHILDREN AND MR. TRAIN.

THE POPE'S BRIEF ON FEMALE…

■ THE

iMti,.*... l j

ENGLISH FETE AT CANNES.

FRIGHTENING THE CORK POLICE!

----------THE SCOTCHMAN IN…

HORRIBLE MURDER.

AN ITALIAN TRAGEDY.

THE AMERICANS AND THE FENIANI…

- DEATH OF MR. W. HERAPATH.

- EXTRAORDINARY SUICIDE.

INCIDENT OF THE AMERICAN WAR.

MEAT PRESERVING IN AUSTRALIA.

A SINGULAR HISTORY.I

MR. ROEBUCK'S DEFENCE of his…

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MR. ROEBUCK'S DEFENCE of his late ADDRESS on TRADES UNIONS. One of Mr. Roebuck's constituents having written to him upon the subject of his late address upon trades unions, the hon. gentleman has made the following reply in justification of his conduct:— My dear Sir,—I assure you that, in my opinion, your letter needs no apology. Its tone is candid and kind, and at once commands my respect and my grati- tude. Now let me proceed to observe upon its con- tents. My great offence then, of mistake, was that I abruptly terminated my lecture or speech without treating on the duties of capital. For a moment con- sider the circumstances in which I was speaking. The audience was one of working-men of a town in which there had lately been horrid disclosures of murder and cruelty, committed by men of the very class which I was addressing. These men had lately had an oppor- tunity of bringing charges, and, if possible, of substan- tiating them against the possessors of capital. No such charge was preferred, and my belief is that none such, if made, could have been substantiated. My mind was by the nature of things directed to the subject oc- cupying all mena minus- viz., the wrong views entev- tained respecting the nature of labour and capital. When I had explained what these errors were, I had really done all, as 1 conceived, that I was expected to do a,nd I illustrated the principles I had laid down by one striking instance. I stated broadly what I thouglitought to be the aim of the Legislature in any future legislation, and there 1 left the matter. What is the conclusion drawn from this, your too hasty determination ? Why, that my confidence in and sympathy with the working man has, if not totally disappeared, greatly diminished. Let me for a moment consider this conclusion. The real meaning of it I take to be this- that capital and labour are antagonists that having discoursed upon the mistakes on the one part, I ought to have set forth the errors of the other. But under the circumstances was this needed? I had endea- voured to show, and I think had shown, that labour and capital were equally necessary for production. There was before the world of Sheffield no proof of any glaring mistake on the part of the capitalist, and I had combined my views of labour and capital so that one exposition exhausted both subjects. My legislative life had been passed in supporting such legislation as pre- vents any improper influence which capital gives from being employed to the detriment of the labourer and, because I did not descant upon what might be the shortcomings of the capitalist, my past life was for- gotten, I was hooted as an enemy, though the whole vigour of my mind and body had for six-and-thirty years been steadfastly and Jisinteivxtt'dl" dev..ted to promoting and watching over theinteivl s .nvfellow- countrymen of every class tind degree. Von cniipel me to talk of myself; I reluctantly yield t) the neces- sity. I ask you, then, to look at mv career as a politician. Is there anything in i has been caused or brought about by consniera^ of self Have I ever flattered or attempt t > ajole the people ? When I have thought them wrong have 1 not said -o ? When I thought them right have I not at every risk boldly supported and defended tnem? But you that more constant intercourse with the rich and influential may have weaned your sympathies from the hardy sons of toil." At what time do you state this supposition? Just when I have given "tho strongest evidence of my confidence in, ;irid sym- pathy with, those hardy sons of toil." ATy influence has been strenuously employed in inducing the House of Commons to give those hardy sons of toil more power in the Government of the country than they ever yet enjoyed. And there are not few who will tell you that that influence was not wholly powerless in bringing about the passing of the last Keform Bill. But your supposition in its very foundation is incorrect. My intercourse with the rich and influential has not been more constant of late years than through my whole iife. My sympathy with the worki.i^ men was not the result of association with them, but arose from careful study and industrious investigation. My habits have been through life the same; my fortunes have not changed. Experience. I hope, has corrected errors. Age has not chilled my sympathies, and the temptations which failed to influence the young man, will not make me swerve from what I believe the path of duty now that my career is coming to its end. I remain, with great senceritv, yours verv truly. J. A. ROEBtJCK.

-------------.-MR. COLERIDGE…

THE FAMINE AMONG THE A3ABSJ

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