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HORSE-FLESH AS AN ARTICLE…

-------------------._-DEAN…

THE MYSTERIOUS DISAPPEARANCE…

DOUBLE MURDER.

MISS MENKEN AND HER CARRIAGE.

The CAUSES of IRISH DISAFFECTION.

THE TRIALS FOR SEDITIOUS LIBELS.

-----A SCENE AT A PARIS STATE…

IRISH CHILDREN AND MR. TRAIN.

THE POPE'S BRIEF ON FEMALE…

■ THE

iMti,.*... l j

ENGLISH FETE AT CANNES.

FRIGHTENING THE CORK POLICE!

----------THE SCOTCHMAN IN…

HORRIBLE MURDER.

AN ITALIAN TRAGEDY.

THE AMERICANS AND THE FENIANI…

- DEATH OF MR. W. HERAPATH.

- EXTRAORDINARY SUICIDE.

INCIDENT OF THE AMERICAN WAR.

MEAT PRESERVING IN AUSTRALIA.

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MEAT PRESERVING IN AUSTRALIA. The following is from the M*lbourm Argus of »ecem- ber 27:— The meat question has during last month created a good deal of discussion, and general satisfaction has been felt at the interest which the subject has called forth at home. Some facts have transpired during the month which clearly show enormous dispro- portion between the price of butcher's meat in Eng- land and Australia. While at the last date mutton was selling in London at 0d. and Is. a pound, ex- cellent legs of mutton were disposed of at Ballarat last week at 9d. each. The great question, however, is to get this meat sent to England without loss of quality or flavour, and we are happy to state that a system has been introduced which promises to solve the difficulty that has hitherto attended the matter. In the early part of the present month several cases reserved according to one of the simplest or most' inexpensive process that could be ima- gined, were opened at JJenae's Hotel in the pre- sence of a number of gentlemen chiefly interested in opening up a market for °"r meat produce. It was prepared in Melbourne, and had beeii over two months m the case There were samples of boiled beet, roast mutton, and roast beef and when the cases were opened the purity of the ^a which arose from the meat was sufficient to show that it had lost none of its essential qualities. The tasting proved equally satisfactory. Nearly all the gentlemen present lunched off the meat, and it was generally pronounced to be excellent, and to have lost neither its flavour, its suc- culence nor its tenderness. A case of tongue was also opened, which was prepared some two years ago, in Europe, after the same process. It was found to be in good condition, though perhaps its characteristics were not so completely preserved as in the beef and mutton. The process by which this result has been accomplished is of the most simple description, and requires only to be earned out with care and attention. The air is taken from the canister, and the meat is preserved in the vacuum. It is placed in the tin in a raw or parboiled state the tin is then put in a chemical solution, capable of producing a high temperature. By the heat the meat is cooked and the air evaporates in the form of steam. At the proper moment the canister is sealed, and the process is complete. The great recommendation of this method is that the meat is preserved entirely free from any gaseous or other unpleasant flavour which more or less attaches to the meat prepared by any other process. Then it is neither novel nor experi- mental. Large quantities of beef and mutton pre- pftred on this systeni were used by both the 1 rench and English armies during the Crimean war. Several gentlemen urvHer whose notice this process has been brought are endeavouring to form a company to carry | it on on an extensive scale. The company has a fine field of operations before it. Meat w;is lately selling in London at lOd. and Is. per pound, and prepared under this system it can be sold in the London market with a handsome profit at 3d. a pound. Great care, hotVever. must be taken to place meat of the best quality in the home market. People have been so frequently deceived with ill-preserved and flavourless meat that they have become sceptical of getting really good beef or mutton in a preserved state. If, however, a market is secured, it offers the most feasible and most profitable mode of using our waste meat, and may be the commencement of an in- dustry of great magnitude and value. It has been suggested that carcases might be sent home in ice. This would probably be a more expensive system than the other, but it would have this advantage, that the meat could be placed on the London market uncooked, I in joints—no slight consideration in the eyes of John Bull.

A SINGULAR HISTORY.I

MR. ROEBUCK'S DEFENCE of his…

-------------.-MR. COLERIDGE…

THE FAMINE AMONG THE A3ABSJ

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