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HORSE-FLESH AS AN ARTICLE…

-------------------._-DEAN…

THE MYSTERIOUS DISAPPEARANCE…

DOUBLE MURDER.

MISS MENKEN AND HER CARRIAGE.

The CAUSES of IRISH DISAFFECTION.

THE TRIALS FOR SEDITIOUS LIBELS.

-----A SCENE AT A PARIS STATE…

IRISH CHILDREN AND MR. TRAIN.

THE POPE'S BRIEF ON FEMALE…

■ THE

iMti,.*... l j

ENGLISH FETE AT CANNES.

FRIGHTENING THE CORK POLICE!

----------THE SCOTCHMAN IN…

HORRIBLE MURDER.

AN ITALIAN TRAGEDY.

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AN ITALIAN TRAGEDY. The Florence correspondent of the London Standard relates the following details of a tragedy Just enaoted at ventimiglia, in Italy, but he will not vouch for their perfect exactness:— A tragical event, which is not without a certain political importance, has just taken place at Venti- miglia, the extreme limit of the Italian kingdom, on the road from Genoa to Nice. A certain Colognese lady, named Emilia Mavuzzi, by marriage Baroness Ruggi, had formed a very intimate friendship with the young Couut of \^illafranca, one of the sons of tho deposed Duchess of Parma. In the course of time the youthful count, either cloyed with the mature charms of the baroness, who was some years older than himself, or from certain other reasons, desired to drop the connection, gave the lady the slip, and took refuge in Nice, whither he was speedily followed by his jilted mistress, who taxed him with his heartless ingratitude, and so obstinately refused to be separated from the object of her pas- sion, that the latter, at his wit's end, was fain to have recourse to the strong arm of authority, and have recourse to the strong arm of authority, and obtained from the French Government an order for the expulsion of Baroness Ruggi from the Im. perial territory. The lady was escorted to the Italian confine, and took up her residence at Ventimiglia, within sight of the spires of Mentone, in that pleasant land of France which she had been forced to leave with a bleeding heart. But even here the fugitive was not left long undisturbed. She was still too near to Nice for his Royal Highness the ex-Duke of Parma, who applied anew for protection to the French Government, by whose instrumentality an order was obtained from Florence directing the hapless lady to choose another place of residence, at a greater distance from the frontier. She was summoned to Porto Maurizio, and enjoined to take her departure from Ventimiglia within a specified period. rfhe baroness, however, whom the sequel proves to have been a woman of spirit and resolution, resisted the order, alleging her rights as an Italian subject, and declaring that she would never be removed alive from the place in which she had fixed her abode. The de. legate of Public Security in Ventimiglia had received his instructions and announced his intention of carry- ing them inro effect. The baroness telegraphed to the central government, but without effect, and when the delegate went to the Albergo del Sale on the day appointed for the removal, the baroness was found dead in her sleeping-room. She. had suffocated her- self with the fumes of burning cliarcoal. On her table were found a few lines in writing they ran as fol- lows :—" I am ioear>/ of life, and seek for relief in death. The Count, of Villa franca is the cause of my death.

THE AMERICANS AND THE FENIANI…

- DEATH OF MR. W. HERAPATH.

- EXTRAORDINARY SUICIDE.

INCIDENT OF THE AMERICAN WAR.

MEAT PRESERVING IN AUSTRALIA.

A SINGULAR HISTORY.I

MR. ROEBUCK'S DEFENCE of his…

-------------.-MR. COLERIDGE…

THE FAMINE AMONG THE A3ABSJ

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