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HORSE-FLESH AS AN ARTICLE…

-------------------._-DEAN…

THE MYSTERIOUS DISAPPEARANCE…

DOUBLE MURDER.

MISS MENKEN AND HER CARRIAGE.

The CAUSES of IRISH DISAFFECTION.

THE TRIALS FOR SEDITIOUS LIBELS.

-----A SCENE AT A PARIS STATE…

IRISH CHILDREN AND MR. TRAIN.

THE POPE'S BRIEF ON FEMALE…

■ THE

iMti,.*... l j

ENGLISH FETE AT CANNES.

FRIGHTENING THE CORK POLICE!

----------THE SCOTCHMAN IN…

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THE SCOTCHMAN IN LONDON. At the Southwark Police-court in London, William Adams, aged fifty, a singular looking man, partially deformed, and who was described on the charge-sheet as a schoolmaster, was placed at the bar for final examination charged with being concerned with others not in custody, in stealing a £20 Bank of England note, a £5 ditto, and three sovereings, the property of James Brash, a young Scotchman, just arrived in London. The prosecutor, rather a simple-looking man, said that on Friday week he came from Scotland in search of a situation in London as a grocer's assistant. He at that time deposited in the London and Westminster Branch Bank, Whitechapel, £28, as he was residing in that neighbourhood. On Wednesday morning last being in want of money he withdrew it all out, and proceeded towards Notting-hill to arrange about a situation that was vacant. While looking in at a window in Oxford-street a country-looking man accosted him and they got into conversation, and after walking about for some time they entered a public- house somewhere eff Regent-street. They met the prisoner there, and he said he had just come into JE5,000 and a deal of property, and that a lady met him to whom he gave a sovereign to buy a pair of gloves, but she had not returned with the change. He said he, however, did not mind that, as he had just got JE200 from his lawyers, and could have S500 more on the following day. The prisoner then took out his purse, and showed what appeared to be fifty or sixty sovereigns, and two notes, looking like Bank of Eng- land notes. The first man then asked witness to take a glass of beer, which he refused, and they all three left the house and proceeded towards Westminster Abbey to compare the sights of London with Edin- burgh. They entered another public-house in that locality, when another man joined their company, and they all crossed over Westminster Bridge. On the way the prisoner asked him what business he was and what had brought him to London. He told him the whole of the circumstances, when the prisoner said he should not mind lending him £ 100 to help him on, as, he saia, his uncle had made his money by lending money to young beginners at 5 per cent. Two of the other men came up at the time and expressed a wish to borrow £ 50 each on similar terms. They then entered a beer-shop in Blackfriars-road, when the prisoner ordered some beer, but witness refused to drink. They went into an .p-stairs room, when the prisoner said, "Now, gentlemen, show me what money you have about you as capital." The other two meir pulled out what appeared to be bank-notes and sovereigns, and held them in their hands. Witness took from his pocket a JS20 and £5 Bank of England notes and three sovereigns, and held them out. The first man he met then took them from him, apparently to examine the amount, and took what appeared to be his own, and passed all to the prisoner. They then sat down, and after chalking something on the table the hrst man said that prisoner had won all the money. Witness then demanded his money back, when the pnsoner and the other man told him to go downstairs with the third man, and it would be all right. He went out of the house with that man. After going twenty yards he suspected he had been robbed. He consequently returned to the beer-house, to look after the prisoner and his two companions, but they had decamped. He then proceeded to the station-house and gave in- formation of the robbery. He did not play cards or gamble with any of the men, neither did he drink with them. He was perfectly sober. The numbers of the notes were as follow :—jB20, No. 93672, 21-8-67 £5, No. 213-16,27-11-67 both of which had been stopped at the Bank of England. In cross-examination by the prisoner, witness said that when in the beer-house near Westminster Abbey the prisoner wanted him to throw a 14 lb. weight but he refused. When in the yard witness picked up a piece of wood which the prisoner said was stone, and betted him 6d. on it. One of the other men cut it with a knife, and pronounced it te be wood, but the pri- soner nenr paid the sixpence (laughter.) He never made any- other bet, or gambled with cards or anything else. William Chandler, 117 H, said that when he arrested prisoner on the charge he told him he arrested him for robbing the prosecutor of J328 in a beer-shop. He said. Cannot that be squared, Mr. Chandler?" Witness told him there was no squaring about him and took him into custody. On the way to the station- house in a cab the prisoner said to the prosecutor "Mind how you word it. If you tell the truth I can get your money back, but not for a week The prosecutor replied, "If you can do that, that is all I want.' The prisoner also said, If you charge us with stealing- your money the magistrate will not allow us to settle it. The prosecutor's brother, who was in the cab, said he would not allow him to settle it, unleaa he was paid B10 besides the money taken from e ro The magistrate asked if he knew the prisoner. Witness replied that he had known him for many years as a card sharper and magsman. He called himself a schoolmaster (laughter). He saw him at Barnet fair two years ago delivering religious tracts, at the same time looking out for flats (renewed laughter). The prisoner said he did not recollect that. He, however, denied robbing the prosecutor. He made bete and lost m a fair way, and the other men had the money. He was eoximitted for trial at the next Surrey sessions.

HORRIBLE MURDER.

AN ITALIAN TRAGEDY.

THE AMERICANS AND THE FENIANI…

- DEATH OF MR. W. HERAPATH.

- EXTRAORDINARY SUICIDE.

INCIDENT OF THE AMERICAN WAR.

MEAT PRESERVING IN AUSTRALIA.

A SINGULAR HISTORY.I

MR. ROEBUCK'S DEFENCE of his…

-------------.-MR. COLERIDGE…

THE FAMINE AMONG THE A3ABSJ

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