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----------. THE WATER QUESTION.

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TOWN COMMISSIONERS, ABERYSTWYTH.

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TOWN COUNCIL, ABERYSTWYTH.I

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THE FATAL ACCIDENT ON THE…

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SELECTION OF SITE OF NEW COUNTY…

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THE WATER QUESTION.

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THE WATER QUESTION. TO THE EDITOR OF THE ABERYSTWYTH OBSERVER. Dear Sir,-Mr Szlumper's flourish at the end of his letter in your last week's publication is rather inconsistent with some of his previously expressed sentiments in regard to propriety in indulgence in personalities. Doubtless he has had a long experience in the practice, as he calls it, of Parliamentary Com- mittees, though the Blue books are silent as regards his labours. Is he quite certain that some of the most successful engineers, aye, and those of the highest reputation in Parliamentary practice, are not members of the Institution of Civil Engineers ? Upon what basis did his own qualifications rest before he himself became connected with that body ? Perhaps he will tell you that this wonderful baptism of his had the retrospective effect of purification of all his early professional shortcomings, and must necessa- rily, therefore, have white-washed all his works. Since he became a member of this institution he has done nothing. He puts me in mind of a German quack doctor who, after honestly pursuing his voca- tion for a time as such, feels a thrilling ambition and sighs after greatness, and impatiently rushes to the fatherland, where the degree he pants for is at once conferred upon him "for a consideration." I need not tell you, Mr Editor, that the Institute of Civil Engineers has no legal status whatever, and that it is simply a club or superior sort of mechanics' insti- tute, where the dilletante meet weekly, in London, to discuss harmless questions very mildly, and deceive themselves into thinking it scientific. To Mr Szlumper personally I shall say, "Salaam, to your condescension, may your shadow never be less." I now proceed, Mr Editor, to notice such parts of Mr Szlumper's letter as affect the question in which we are all so vitally interested. The calcula- tions for delivering and estimates of cost were given for 6-inch, 7-inch, 8-inch, and 9-inch mains respec- tively, and to the commissioners, to whom the choice more properly belonged, was left the selection of the size of the mains. The figures shew that for the present requirements of the town a 6-inch main would be sufficient. Here I am, aghast! On pur- suing Mr Szlumper's remarks, the following fas- cinates me, my very breathing becomes difficult, I am almost in in a state of coma read, Mr Editor, read, aye, and mark, and learn too "Perhaps Mr George Jones does not know that my proposed source of supply is very much higher than that of Doctor Williams's, and that, therefore, a 6-inch main will be fully adequate for a constant supply for 10,000 inha- bitanta I" Put this quotation, dear Mr Editor, in italics. Now, the height of Nanteos reservoir above the Rbeidol bridge, the Trefechan side of Aberystwyth, is 268 feet, the distance being 41 miles, and the fall per mile is 61*5 feet. A 6-inch main will deliver under these conditions 216 gallons per minute. According to Mr Szlumper's own statement the distance of the source of his proposed supply is 13 miles, and the height 800 feet; the fall here is pre- cisely the same per mile as that stated, namely, 61 "5 feet per mile, and of course the delivery is exactly the same amount. What! he who delights in flourishing the M. Inst. C.E." in our faces, to commit himself like this! aye, and in print, too! Was the baptism before mentioned performed in Lethe ? The mains from the Nanteos reservoir can be laid by the side of the turnpike road, no metal will be disturbed, and they will be easy of access at all times for repair—in short, of all lines for such works, such a one as this is to be preferred. The estimate of the excavation and filling, in reference to this part of the proposed scheme is, if anything, too high. Now, the contrary Mr Szlumper proposes to lay his pipes along the side of the railway, (you must catch your fish before you cook him, Mr Szlumper.) Is there no danger to the pipes from the great vibra- tion caused by heavy trains ? Is there no danger from the continual sinking of the embankments ? Can the Ystwyth be bound over to keep the peace ? Is it very convenient at all times to follow and repair damaged pipes, and other necessary works, along a line of railway ? Lastly—for I must stop, so many and so great are the objections to this crude and wild scheme, which crowd upon me-who is to be responsible to the railway company for the damage which their line may sustain from accidents to the main ? One remark more, and so rnuch for Mr Szlumper." How would the town feel if, upon rising some fine morning in the midst of the season, after a heavy flood, it found that its patronymic, the Ystwyth, in her wrath and jealousy for the many slights she bad suffered at her children's hands, had ruthlessly obtained for herself a little of the pure water she also stands so much in need of? I am yours faithfully, GEO. JOXES.

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