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-,---THE POPULARITY OF MR.…

ON BEINS PBEBBNTED WITH A…

MR. TRAIN'! PROTEST.

A WIFE'S AFFECTIONATE CONFESSION!

DREADFUL SUFFERINGS OF SHIP.WRECKED…

DREADFUL ACCIDENT ON THE CAMBRIAN…

--A TRAGEDY WITH A SPICE OF…

ISTATIONS OF THE BRITISH ARMY.

ACTION for LIBEL AGAINST a…

AN APPLICATION TO DISSOLVE…

A CAB STRIKE IN LIVERPOOL.

A SLEEPY BRIDE.

THE AMERICAN PRESS ON MR.…

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BURNT TO DEATH!

. MURDER AND OUTRAGE IN DUM-FRIESSHIRE"

THE REV. B. SPEKE-THE MISSING…

THE" PECULIAR PEOPLE" AND…

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A LITTLE MISTAKE CORRECTED!

THE END OF A DISMAL LIFE!

SERVANTS' FEES.

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SERVANTS' FEES. The following remarks on the dissatisfaction often ex- pressed by gamekeepers with the fees tendered to them through the courtesy of sporting gentlemen are from Once a Week The extent of which the habit of feeing keepers has gone may be instanced by a story from one of the sporting reviews. We know the nobleman in question, who acted with much promptitude and good sense but for obvious reasons we forbear to mention his name. Lord G—— went down to enjoy a moderate day's gunning some distance from his quarters. At the close of the day he tendered two sovereigns as his honorarium to the head keeper. Thia gentleman informed the other gentleman that he never took anything less than paper—a very excellent lesson for all casual clergymen, physicians, literary men, and the lower classes in general, who would probably like to change places with the keeper for a time. Lord G- very properly transferred hia two sovereigns to an under-keeper, feeling that it was a duty incumbent on him to pay two sovereigns to his friend's servants somehow or other. This extortion is luckily not invariable. We, in company with eight or ten other gentlemen, some of them wealthy enough, have gwen two sovereigns, with great satisfaction, for four days' cover shooting, in which the results were over 1,000 head each day, and have received in return a very civil acknowledg- ment. But that is in a house where the organization is invariably good, and where the master places his guests. There will then be no high payments for hot corners, and the poor man will not have the satis- faction of hearing a young millionaire let off his gun 30 times to his once. The disposition of guns in a cover ought not to be at the disposal of a servant, to whom the temptation of £51 in lieu of one, may be too great to be overcome. There are always extremes, true virtue lying as the mean between them. There are "screws who cannot understand that a moderate ac- knowledgment is encouraging to a good servant, and has become a rule in good society. There are also in- considerate spendthrifts who think of nothing but a servants'-hall popularity, to be bought at any price. And there are a few who are so far moral cowards as to fear to make a stand when they know themselves to be right. The proper adaptation of such customs wants nothing but consideration. That a fee is ex- pected—nay, demanded, in the case of sporting servants one common instance may show. In the lifetime of a celebrated sporting baronet, after the covers had been shot, a regular bill for ammunition was placed on the dressing-table of each guest, signed by the keeper, and leaving a space opposite his own name to be filled up by the sum proposed to be given. It is so in some houses in Scotland at the present time. Regarding a day's or week's shooting as a matter of business, It seems as fair a mode of levying a tax as any; theugh, perhaps, long purses would get the best of the [moor and dogs the following season. This danger, however, may be avoided by the practice adopted in certain houses of having a box for the ser- vants' fees you can put in what you will—much or little. What is really wanted is little moderation on the part of the donors, and an understanding among the retainers of great houses that a man may be a gentleman, and deserving of attention, although not possessed of a dukedom and one hundred thousand a year. As to the neat-handed Phillises, with their cherry-coloured ribands, and the ever-ready buttons who open the doors and hand the viands in middle- clasa life, he would be a curmudgeon indeed who would curtail their Christmas-boxes. No man fears to give them too much lest he should spoil the market, and the fee must be small indeed which would insult their dignity. That is another part of the subject which needs no discussion.

WHAT IS THE LIMIT OF HUMAN…

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A MYSTERIOUS CASE.

ASSASSINATION OF A GENTLEMAN…

COMTESSE D'ALTEYRAC v. LORD…

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THE MARKETS.