Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

31 articles on this Page

[No title]

-,---THE POPULARITY OF MR.…

ON BEINS PBEBBNTED WITH A…

MR. TRAIN'! PROTEST.

A WIFE'S AFFECTIONATE CONFESSION!

DREADFUL SUFFERINGS OF SHIP.WRECKED…

DREADFUL ACCIDENT ON THE CAMBRIAN…

--A TRAGEDY WITH A SPICE OF…

ISTATIONS OF THE BRITISH ARMY.

ACTION for LIBEL AGAINST a…

AN APPLICATION TO DISSOLVE…

A CAB STRIKE IN LIVERPOOL.

A SLEEPY BRIDE.

THE AMERICAN PRESS ON MR.…

[No title]

[No title]

BURNT TO DEATH!

. MURDER AND OUTRAGE IN DUM-FRIESSHIRE"

THE REV. B. SPEKE-THE MISSING…

News
Cite
Share

THE REV. B. SPEKE-THE MISSING CLERGYMAN. A gentleman, dating from Morley's Hotel, Trafal- gar Square, London, writes to The Times In order that your readers may be made acquainted with all the facts connected with the disappearance of the Rev. B. Speke, I trust you will favour me by inserting the follow- ing particulars. Mr. Speke left Somersetshire on Wednesday, the 8th of January, by the train from Chard Station (London and South- Western Railway) at eleven o'clock, taking a return ticket, and telling his groom to be waiting at the station the follow- ing evening. The object of his journey to London was to be present at the marriage of his most intimate friend the next day. The train was rather late into London, and he took a four-wheeled cab and drove to 79, Eccleston-square, the house of his brother-in-law, where he the cab, and where he remained about ten minutes talking to the root- man, who had been brought up in hiaP^8^1' Speke then went out, saying to theeerv&nt that he was'going to buy anew hat, and afterwards on business into Westminster. He went to a hatter's in Warwick-street, chose a hat, and told the hatter to send it to Eccleston-squ^e not later than 0.45, as he was going out to dtaner at seven 0 clock. Mr. Speke then left the shop at about 6.30, and all trace of him from there ceases. His intention to return to EcGleston-sq*iarY8 mo.st, clear. He told the servant of his dinner engagement, and he had made an appointment with a young man whom he had apprenticed in London to call and see about 6'30. In perfect health, of an evenly-balanced mInd, high religious character, and of a singularly cheerful aid amiable disposi- tion, he was about the last man that one would have imagined could come to harm, physical# or morally; and being the only member of hi3 family with his parents, and knowing how heavily recent Dereavements have pressed upon them, it Is incredible tb1\thahe should not have communicated with his family if be d the power to dolO. The hat he was wearing was picked up atbabout 7 30 p.m. on the 8th of January in the Bird cage-wa^oy a respectable workman, who took it home, intending to WbQar it, and who, some days after, hearing the paragraph a out the missing Mr. Speke read, and seeing the same naifem me hat, handed it over to the police. I only hope if any persons read this letter who can throw the slightest light upon this mystery they will &t once com- municate with me. Any coachman or cabman who drove along the Birdcage-walk between six seven o'clock that evening; any persons who two or three people assembled there, or in the parts oi Westminster ad- jacent any persons who observed two or more dragging or apparently helping another man; in faf1* who saw any- thing suspicious that evening, and who wia communicate with me, may possibly give the clue W"Ch will solve this distressing problem On Saturday rumours of a JDoøt extraordinary character were circulated in London m reference to the Rev. Mr. Speke, the brother of the explorer and discoverer of the source of. the Nile, and for whose restoration a reward & the "tat instance of £300, and now £500 has beeo offered. They were to the effect that his body had been discovered by the police in a house in piinlieo, the occupants of which had left in a very sudden and mysterious manner some few days ago. On instituting inquiries as to the truth of this allegation at Scotland-yard, however. the information was that no such circumstance had been telegraphed from the station of the B division in the immediate vicinity of the locality indicated, which the acting inspector would be bound to do under the police regulations the moment such a circumstance had taken place. This report may therefore be looked upon as without foundation. The same inquiries, however, led to information from another quarter. During the afternoon a telegram was received from the K division that the body of a gentleman found drowned in a small river running through a place called Stapleford, near Ongar, Essex, was then lying at a public-house called the Rabbits, at the former place, awaiting a coroner's inquest. Inspector Langley, of the detective police, who has been entrusted with the charge of the case, went down the other night to ascertain particulars, and see if the body could be identified,

THE" PECULIAR PEOPLE" AND…

[No title]

A LITTLE MISTAKE CORRECTED!

THE END OF A DISMAL LIFE!

SERVANTS' FEES.

WHAT IS THE LIMIT OF HUMAN…

--------"DOING" THE DUBLIN…

A MYSTERIOUS CASE.

ASSASSINATION OF A GENTLEMAN…

COMTESSE D'ALTEYRAC v. LORD…

[No title]

THE MARKETS.