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-,---THE POPULARITY OF MR.…

ON BEINS PBEBBNTED WITH A…

MR. TRAIN'! PROTEST.

A WIFE'S AFFECTIONATE CONFESSION!

DREADFUL SUFFERINGS OF SHIP.WRECKED…

DREADFUL ACCIDENT ON THE CAMBRIAN…

--A TRAGEDY WITH A SPICE OF…

ISTATIONS OF THE BRITISH ARMY.

ACTION for LIBEL AGAINST a…

AN APPLICATION TO DISSOLVE…

A CAB STRIKE IN LIVERPOOL.

A SLEEPY BRIDE.

THE AMERICAN PRESS ON MR.…

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THE AMERICAN PRESS ON MR. TRAIN'S ARREST. The New York papers contain comments on the arreat of Mr. Train. Both the Tribune and the Times looked upon the arrest in the first instance as an advertising expedient on the part of Mr. Train, but both journals were of an opinion that if an American citizen had really been arrested for Fenian speeches in America the authorities at Washington were bound to take immediate action. The Times says:— We await the receipt of detaUs before attempting to dis- cuss the course which it may be the duty of this country to pursue. The naked fact of the arrest of three American citizens on the almost incredible ground that they are mem- bers of the American wing of the Ionian organization Is all of which we are at present advised. In the interest of peace we trust that the explanations to be furnished will throw a different light on the occurrence, and divest it of the danger- ous features which it at present wears. As it stands now, it is an outrage to which this country ought not, and will not, submit. It is a case not for diplomacy—for patient and pro- longed talk; but for the prompt demand and immediate exaction of redress. The Tribune, after suggesting that tha story is not correct, observes:— If true, then America must take decided ground. This Government cannot permit the wanton arrest of American citizens by any Power upon earth. If Mr. Train has been unjustly arrested, he must be returned as promptly as we returned Mason and Slidell. The Herald, as might have been expected, takes a much more decided line. It says:— It is the duty of the Government to Inquire at once Into the facts connected with the collaring and hauling off to gaol of such a prominent patriot and distinguished citizen. Congress should immediately take up the case. It will be far better than legislating to destroy the Government and give political and social supremacy to the negro over the white man. Above all, Secretary Seward should not suffer this outrage to pass unnoticed. Let him write no long letters on the subject, which nobody will read, but bring the matter to an issue by immediately arresting Charles Dickens, and holding him as a hostage for the captured Train. Here is a direct road out of the dimoulty. Dickens and Train would be an excellent sot-off, one for the other. As the greater nation of the two we can afford to be the more generous, and therefore we do not propose that Dickens shall be imprisoned, even though Train be kept under lock and key. The hostage may go through with his readings and make as much money as he can, only giving his parole not to leave the United States until Train's return, safe and sound, with his flowing locks unshorn. If Seward will at once arrest Dickens in the name of the American Republic, we shall speedily bring England to her senses and satisfy the Fenians on both sides of the Atlantic. A telegram from London in the same paper makes the following statement:— Mr. Adams, United States Minister here, at once saw Lord Stanley, who, on his representation, ordered the release of Mr. Train. Lord Stanley disavowed the act on the part of Government, and stated that the local authorities were solely responsible for it. Air. Adams prompt action secured Mr. Train's speedy release. The Chicago Tribune, before hearing of Mr. Train's release, wrote :— George Francis Train, who started for Europe some ten days ago with a large mouthful of renianism, was arrested at Queenstown on the arnval of. the steamer. This action on the part of the British authorities is a perfect godsend to Train, to whom notoriety is more than meat and drink. One week in gaol would be more comfortable to him than six eligible town sites in Nebraska. But the case has a serious aspect as well. Mr. Train is an American citizen, and the laws and treaties in force in the two countries do not authorise his arrest for mere words. It would perhaps go hard with him if they did. The public mind in this country has been considerably exercised of late by the summary treatment accorded to our people in Great Britain who have been charged with Fenianism It will not brook any infrac- tion of international law in the case of Tram, or anybody else. The best thing the English authorities can do with George Francis is to let him go.

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BURNT TO DEATH!

. MURDER AND OUTRAGE IN DUM-FRIESSHIRE"

THE REV. B. SPEKE-THE MISSING…

THE" PECULIAR PEOPLE" AND…

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A LITTLE MISTAKE CORRECTED!

THE END OF A DISMAL LIFE!

SERVANTS' FEES.

WHAT IS THE LIMIT OF HUMAN…

--------"DOING" THE DUBLIN…

A MYSTERIOUS CASE.

ASSASSINATION OF A GENTLEMAN…

COMTESSE D'ALTEYRAC v. LORD…

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THE MARKETS.