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» SAINT DA VI 0'8 CLUB.

HUNTING APPOINTMENTS."

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ABERYSTWYTH TOWN COUNCIL.

& PENNY READINGS, ABERYSTWYTH.

. ABERYSTWYTH LITERARY INSTITUTE…

+ NEW WELSH CHURCH, ABERYSTWITH.

, ABERYSTWITH LITERARY INSTITUTE…

4 ANNE OWENS' CASE.

4 CAPTAIN DAVIES, OF THE EXPRESS.

. A SAD DOG.

A PRESS-MAN'S BUSINESS.

. THE FENIAN INSURRECTION.

« THE FRENCH GOVERNMENT AND…

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« THE FRENCH GOVERNMENT AND PEOPLE. The speech of the Emperor of the French at the opening of Parliament has been received with varied feelings, but on the whole .it has exercised a favourable influence on the course of public events. Count Walewski, the Presi- dent of the Legislative Body, in opening that Chamber had, as it were, to put this speech to the vote, for the etiquette which restrained the least manifestation of opinion before his Ma- jesty, did not prevent the members of the Corps Legislatif from expressing their judg- ment in the ejaculatory way which is so com- mon with popular assemblies. But the impe- rial address of Count Walewski's speech, which was of course ultra-Napoleonic, are now being judged by the people; and it is pleasing to add, in the interests of Europe, and this judg- ment, so far as we can judge, appears likely to be favourable. There are at this moment many legislative and other reforms being discussed by the French people—reforms in the Senate, in the Legislative Body, in the freedom of public meeting, and in the press—which will probably be of far more importance than appears gene- rally to be considered. Uuder ordinary cir- cumstances the Chambers would now be dis- cussing the Address on the Imperial speech, but this Address is abolished by a stroke of the Emperor's pen, and the right of interpellation is substituted. Hampered as this latter right s by certain official regulations, we neverthe- less believe that it will gradually work towards the grand desideratum of all good Govern- ment-the influence of enlightened public opinion upon Parliament. Already this new right has borne fruit, and we feel confident that it will gradually tend towards the expan- sion of popular liberties in France. But there are two. other reforms which, if carried out in the spirit which we have a right to expect from the statements of the leading French journals, will be of more importance than all the internal reforms and modifications in the proceedings of the French Chambers. We refer to reforms as to the pre^s, and as to the right of public meeting. As the law on these matters now stand, it is utterly disgrace- ful to the country, and a scandal and by-word to the nations. Not more than 20 people can meet together without 8uthority," while the press is hampered and clogged with all sorts of pains and penalties which render its free action impossible. There have been so many ru- mours as to the alleged character of these reforms that we refrain from attempting to de- cide which is the most probable. but of one thing we are certain, that the laws as to the press—which are of even greater importance than those regulating public meetings—will bo rendered less irksome; all the rumours agree thus far. Journalism, both as a profession and a trade, will be freer than it now is, and the right to the expression of opinion will be more decided that at present. This in itself will he a great boon to the French public, but if we add to this further freedom in the expression of opinion in the Chambers and in public meetings, the Freneli liberties will have re- ceived an accession indeed. And it is high time that these liberties were extended. France has waited long, if not very patiently, for them; and she may now be congratulated on her brightening prospects.

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CAMBRIAN RAILWAYS COMPANY.

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THE IRON, COAL, AND TINPLATE…

♦ ! ACCOUCHEMENT OF THE PRINCESS…

BREACH OF PRIVILEGE.

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A.DINC S.I

I THE FENIANS.

—:—* ART INTELLIGENCE.

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ANNE OWENS' CASE.

ISHAMEFUL OUTRAGE.

THE CHILDREN IN THE MOON.

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