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I————— dor Jnnhnn Cmtsgraieirt.

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I————— dor Jnnhnn Cmtsgraieirt. TVe deem it right to state that we do not at tJ'. times ide&tlij Btselves with our correspondent's opinions.] The more one hears about the reception of the Queen's Speech the more reason there is to conclude that on the whole it has been well received, with the exception, perhaps, of the most important paragraph of all-that relating to Reform. This has been so ex. tensively discussed, from every possible point of view, that I do not propose to enter on the vexed questions arising out of this fertile subject, nor to deal with a matter so purely one of opinion aa whether the right mode of dealing with this question is or is not by reso- lution. The announcement that Ministers would endeavour so to deal with it has not created any great surprise. That they would propose this course has been for a long time one of the most prominent rumours of the day. The Session has begun well by the introduction of several measures of social and legal reform; and if experience did not remind us how frequently Burns' axiom is verified, that "the best designs o' mice and men gang aft aglee," we might reasonably rejoice at the proepect of the present Session being productive of great good. Whatever else is rejected, I hope that Mr. Hardy's Poor Law Amendment Bill will be carried. We have heard so much lately of work. house mismanagement and the cruel and stupid treatment of the sick poor, together with the anomalies of heavy poor-rates where they can the least be afforded, and light rates where heavy ones could easily be paid, that the subject has become wearisome; but it ought not to be shirked for that reason. Among Mr. Hardy's proposals arot-to place imbeciles in separate establishments; to remove pauper children to schools; to provide accommodation for lunatics, fever patients, &c.; to place the infirmaries under separate management; an to give facilities for the training of nurses and the education of medical officers; to establish central dispensaries; to repeal our ten Poor Law Acts; to place the whole Metropolis under one central board; and partially to distribute more equally the charges for the relief of the poor. It is remarkable how these suggested reforms commend themselves to other towns besides our own. We have peculiar and monster evils here—the very things which Mr. Hardy suggests for us would be applicable to many large towns, if not to all. The measure is not at all of a party character, and it is to be hoped it will not be made so. It is said that her Majesty will this spring take a yachting cruise, and that the Victoria and Albert is now being decorated for the purpose. The royal yacht will be ready by the 20th of May. In con. junction with this agreeable rumour I recall another pleasant rumour which was mentioned a short time Bince, and which has not been contradicted—that her Majesty will visit Germany and on her return stay a few days with the Emperor and Empress of the French. It is said, too, that the Queen intends to pay a visit to the Lakes of Killarney during the summer. All this locks as if her Majesty were coming out," as the common phrase is; and perhaps it is not too much to hope that Queen Victoria will at last abanden that seclusion which the country so much regrets. I have not, by the way, seen any contradiction of the statement that the Prince of Wales intends to reside for a portion of each year in Ireland. Taken in connection with the Queen's visit to Killarney this will go a long way towards annihilating that dis- affection which now unhappily exists in the Sister Isle. Fenianism, already languishing, will have a hard time of it in the face of the exuberant loyalty of the people generally, should these rumours be verified. The subject of Trades' Unions has for some time past excited such general attention that the Royal Com- mission to inquire into their operation has been pretty generally received with satisfaction. It is to be re- gretted, perhaps, that there is to be as it were an inquiry within an inquiry, for the Sheffield outrages are to be specially examined into but this need not neutralise or weaken the effect of the general inquiry. The personnel of the commission does not satisfy everybody of course; what selection would? but Government have perhaps done aU that they could to meet the views of working men. A deputation having waited on Mr. Walpole to urge that some bona fide working men should be placed on the commission, the reply was given that, were this to be done, employers also would have to be represented, and Government thought it lietter to have an independent body, partly composed of members of Parliament; but the views of the deputation have since been partially met by placing Mr. Frederick Harrison on the commission. This gentleman, who is a barrister, is well known (as he signs his name) as a writer in the Pall Mall Gazette, especially on such sub- jects as Trades' Unions; and then we have Mr. Thomas Hughes, who is the idol of the working men of Lambeth. One just object which the commission will have in view will be an examination into the pro. priety of establishing courts of conciliation for the settlement of disputes between employers and em- ployed. There is of course great difficulty in this matter, but not insuperable. The weak point of all systems of arbitration is the voluntary character o it, or, in other words, the absence of power to enforce the decisions of arbitrators. But should this royal commission result in the proposal to establish trade councils of conciliation, or whatever else they may be called, these might be made to work in conjunction with the common law of the land, just as they do in France. For nearly sixty years these institutions have been in working in that country, Napoleon hav- ing established the first in 1809. These trade councils, as now existing, are established by government decree, on the advice of a Chamber of Commerce or of Arts and Manufactures. The number of members varies with the requirements of the particular trade for which it is appointed, the minimum being six, exclusive of the president and vice-president. The council is com- posed'of masters and workmen in equal number, but the president and vice-president, who are chosen by the Government, need not be master-manufacturers or workmen. The members of the council are elected at a meeting called by the prefect of the town. The electors are master manufacturers who have been licensed (almost everything is licensed in France, and on the whole the country is all the better for it) for five years, and workmen who have exercised their trade for five years at least. Masters and men must be men of education. Each council holds a general meeting once a week, the number of masters and men being equal. There is a preliminary tribunal for the settlement of disputes, called a bureau de conciliation, which in fact is but part of the council of conciliation. This latter council cannot adjudicate beyond 200 francs (8U) above which sum the matter in dispute must be taken to the law courts. The whole system in France is more adapted perhaps to settle an individual dis- pute between a master and a man than to de- termine such disputes as those which in this country so often end in strikes or, locks-out; but it is a remarkable fact that a very small propor- tion of the trade disputes are even carried into the law-courts, the great majority be tig- settled by these conciliatory councils. It will be a good thing if some Buch an arrangement as this could be brought into this country; it would be the commencement of a new ra, and would inaugurate an infinitely better system than the suicidal method of a strike on the one hand, or of a lock-out on the other. Whatever decision this commission, and ultimately Parliament, may arrive at, one thing is clear—that trades' unions cannot be put down; they are far too powerful for that, nor, indeed, would it be well to put them down if it could be done, saving that then we should have such scenes enacted here as have taken place in Belgium, which has lately been flaunted before the eyes of the working man as an example. Miners rising to resist a reduction of wages, resisting the troops that were sent against them, and thirty people killed—that is not a desirable state of things to introduce into this country. The reduction of the Bank minimum to 3 per cent. seems to have had very little effeet in improving busi- ness, which continues very dull. There are signs, however, of more activity before long, and meanwhile the distress in the eastern districts of London has become less severe. London tradesmen grumble bitterly of the bad winter they have had, but they look forward to a busy season from April to August. It is expected that London will be very full this season, and the five Courts which are to be held, as well as the levees of drawing-rooms, will perhaps make the season gay as well.

PASSING EVENTS, RUMOURS, &0.

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EPITOME OF NEWS.

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IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT.

THE RESOLUTIONS ON REFORM.

THE REFORM LEAGUE DEMONSTRATION…

THE MEETING AT THE AGRICULTURAL…

HOW COLLIERY EXPLOSIONS ARE…

THE EXCITEMENT OF LOTTERIES…

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THE LOST CHILD.