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<®nr fratki Craesjjimlretii

PASSING EVENTS, RUMOURS, &c.

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OPENINGOFPARLIAMENT.

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THE EXTRAORDINARY CHARGE OF…

THE TICHBORNE BARONETCY.

AN AMERICAN VENDETTA,

THE JAMAICA PROSECUTIONS.

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THE JAMAICA PROSECUTIONS. At Bow-street, on Wednesday morning, an applica- tion was made io the Chief Magistrate, Sir Thomas Henry, by Mr. Fitzjames Stephen for warrants for the apprehension of Colonel Nelson and Lieutenant Brand, on the charge of the wilful murder of Mr Gordon, at Morant Bay, in the county of Surrey, in the Island of Jamaica, in October,. 1865. Mr. Stephen, with whom was Mr. J. Horne Payne, was Instructed by Messrs. Shaen and Ro coe. He stated that t he actual prosecutors were Mr. John Stuart Mill, the Mtmber of Parliament for Westminster, and Mr. P. A. Tay'or the Member for Leicester, both now present. The name of Governor Eyre was not at present Included becau'e that gentleman was not at the present moment within the jlnis- dtctlon of the court. There was no doubt, however, that he would be ready and willing to meet the charge, and they had an intimation from his solicitor that he would attend upon due notice. He was desirous of doing perfect justice to all parties, and must therefore state that Mr. Eyre had shown the most honourable and courageous determinv ion to meet most fully and fairly every responsibility properly de- volving upon him. He (Mr. Stephen) was sorry that the gre .t questions at issue could not be decided upon a less grave charge than that of murder, the parties who instituted the prosecution being actuated solely by motives of public justice, and not by any petty party or personal ill-feeling. But he should contend that the act, if, as he alleged, illegal, was an act of murder, and not of manslaughter. The deliberate putting of a man to death illegally was murder, and was not excused either by the good faith or Ignorance of the parties or by the argument that they acted under orders of superiors. Mr. Stephen went into an elaborate statement of the motives of the prosecutors, the facts, and the law of the case, contending that the question at issue was whether the law of England was mpreme, or whether the sovereign had power In time of rebellion to suspend all law, and set up a military despotism, with absolute power over the lives of the subjects of the realm. A number of witnesses were examined in support of the application, and after a discussion between Mr. Stephen and Sir Thomas Henry, it was agreed to adjourn the proceedings.

STRANGE SCENE IN A THEATRE.

THE END OF THE MORMONS COMING.

A FEMALE " CAVALRYMAN!" j

A STRANGE DREAM.