Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

35 articles on this Page

<®nr fratki Craesjjimlretii

PASSING EVENTS, RUMOURS, &c.

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

OPENINGOFPARLIAMENT.

[No title]

THE EXTRAORDINARY CHARGE OF…

THE TICHBORNE BARONETCY.

AN AMERICAN VENDETTA,

News
Cite
Share

AN AMERICAN VENDETTA, A brief account of a "vendetta"' has gone the rounds of the papers which had occurred in Ten- nessee—a state which has always had the reputation of being more polished and highly civilised than any of the other slave States, except, perhaps, Virginia. We give a lengthy account of the affair, and prohably nothing more utterly barbarous than this case could be discovered in the annals of Corsican feuds. The remarkable feature in it is not. however, that Tenes- seans should be vengeful and bloodthirsty, but that two families should carry on a kind of private war for over twenty years, and that fourteen men should be slaughtered on one side or other in cold blood without a conviction of a murder or manslaughter ever taking place. In fact, no judicial inquiry into any of the murders except the first one seems ever to have been made. This is the story as it is told in the Louisville Journal:— In the fall of 1846, a family named Johnstone removed from the neighbouring county of Wautauga North Carolina, into Carter County, East Tennessee and settled down in the neighbourhood of anotner family named Rogers. Johnstone, who appeared to be an energetic industrious man, immedi- ately went to work at clearing up a little farm. He felled trees, grubbed up undergrowth burned stumps and split rails to fence In the ground he reclaimed from the wilder- ness. In this labour he was assisted by two sons—both were lads. While the three were engaged In erecting fencing about their patch of land, Rogers rode up to where they were at work one day and laid claim to a pile of rails, about a dozen in number. This claim Johnstone disputed, and finally, on Rogers applying to him the epithets of "liar," and "thief the North Carolinian pulled him from his horse, and administered to him a severe chastisement with his fists. Rogers went off vowing vengeance, and In the course of an hour returned to the spot armed with a rifle, the contents of which he discharged into the body of Johnstone, producing fatal consequences. Rogers, who was a man ot some wealth for those primitive times, and was possessed of considerable influence among his rough, unlettered neighbours, was acquitted of the charge of murder by an examining Justice. This was the beginning of the terrible vendetta that has run through the years that followed cuttlDg down the males of the two families In the pride of their strength and manhood. The two Johnstone lads vowed vengeance upon the mur- derer of their parent, and one of them, Thomas, worked nipht and day with but one object in view-to accumulate the means to purchase a rifle. At length, he became the owner of one, and one Sabbath morning, with his gun upon his shoulder, he approached the house of Rogers. The latter was sitting upon his porch, and as he few young Johnstone approaching, probably divining his intention, arose hastily and started towards the rack where his own gun was suspended. But the avenger of blood was upon his path, and ere he could reach his weapon he fell upon the floor a corpse, his heart pierced by the bullet of his toe. Rogers left behind him a young wito and three children, one of whom was a boy. Among the rough backwoodsmen of Carter County young Johnstone's crime was looked upon with satisfaction it not favour, the Indian law of retaliation being looked upon by them as the very cream of Justice. Afterward Johnstone married, and as the years passed by he became surrounded by an Interesting and numerous PrTheDboy William Rogers In the meantime had almost reached manhood's utate, when one morning, without (tivulging his attention to his mother or sisters, he left the house with his father s rifle upon his shoulder as If he were going out to hunt, and in less than an hour a grief-striken mother and children were weeping over the corpse of a slain husband and father. Young Rogers, in his turn had become an avenger, and Thomas Johnstone fell beneath his band. In time the memories of these three murders died away and those who were children th«n «rrew up to men and women. William Rogers had taken tcf him"1* wlf?' a"d become the head of a growing family- One morning he rode into Elizabethtown aild as be did not return that night—a circumstance that had never occurred before- his wife became v«y uneaVy. »nd in ^morning induced h«r brother to start to town ia search of her missing hus- band from the houra he came upon the^bod^orhta br^ta-uw, lying in the road stiff L,d cold in Heath His brain hsd been pierced by a rlfla balL AuLn.h SumS-dewr was never discovered, yet the com- munUv nnietlv^ccepted the belief that Henry Johns'one, a rm of Thomas^ who was slain by Rogers, was the perpetrator of the deed Some years afterwards, iu a drunken moment, In Elizabeth town, this young man acknowledged h" had slain Rogers, and gave as his reason that the latter had killed his father. Johnstone was a young man, and only a few months before the murder had been married to a young girl in the neighbourhood. Again the chart of time was unrolled, and at least ten years had been added to the past when a young lad, a son of the murdered Rogers, engaged in an altercation in the yard of th* Oourt-houjw at XlUMMthtown with JrtnuCone, who } "MB was thpu a middle-aced man, and #3r .?e7j •-ncj1wonn''» upon him w; "i knife tbV be died vn :V. w- .g Tim it vv,.rit on (,■' years now f J ••nztoite fal i„i» !,v tbe hands of a Rogers, and then a m failing beneath 'be avengiDg hand of a Johnstone, un -i the war intervened, and for a time, at least, the terrible feud apneared to have ended* The cessation of hostilities broueht the survivors of the warring families back to Carter C >nnty n'e< sur- £ iv™ consisted of Randall Rogers sna Robert J > n-one both battle-scarred veterans, and both uumarrled nu n Qi » J>.VeiilD?Lof the 6th inst. these two men met in a grocery at Jil zsbethtown, and soon became ei.gaged in an alterrat on. Bystanders Interfered, and for an hour or two a c 1 jwjnn was averted. They were separated by friends, and taken off in opposite directions. This occurred about noon. About three o'clock, as Rojers was going up the street he saw Johnttone coming down. Astbeyneared each other they drew their re- volvers and commenced simultaneously firing upon each other continuing to advance as they fired. Finally, and wheu ubout four feet distance from Johnstone, Rogers sank to tre pave- ment, and as he lay the last act of his life was to fl>t> the last charge in his jpistol into the abdomen of Johnstone, whose last bullet, fired at the same instant penetrated his antagonist's brain. causing instant death. Johns.one ree'ed and fell across the body of his foe, and when bystanders rushed to where they lay, he, too, had passed beyond all reach of mortal aid. Almost at the same instant of time their two blood-guilty souls bad gone to join the gory ghosts of their ancestors. Thus ended a feud that has existed for twenty years, In the course of which fourteen men have died violent deaths.

THE JAMAICA PROSECUTIONS.

STRANGE SCENE IN A THEATRE.

THE END OF THE MORMONS COMING.

A FEMALE " CAVALRYMAN!" j

A STRANGE DREAM.