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<®nr fratki Craesjjimlretii

PASSING EVENTS, RUMOURS, &c.

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OPENINGOFPARLIAMENT.

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In the House ot Lords, on February 5, Earl Beauchamp, on rising to move an humble Address, In reply to the Speectt from the Throne, observed that the topics touched upon were of so varied and so important a character, that it would be Impossible to allude to all of them. The first question of importance was peace or war; and it was matter for con- gratulation that her Majesty's relations with foreign powers continued satisfactory. He was sure he was ex- pressing the feelings of their lordships when he said Ii; was their cordial desire to keep on friendly terms with the great American Republic. Having alluded to the War between Spain and Chili and Pern, and the m. surrection in Crete, and the joint efforts of this Government 'iO'lth France to bring about a better relation between the Porte a*,} tu christian subjects his lordship reviewed the ever.ts ol the past YPRr, which had resulted In such vast cnanges in Continental Europe, and then passed on to con- sider the stain ot Ireland and the circumstances which had necessitated the »fc*nension of the habeat corpus, and ex- pressed a hope that IIl.V were so far lmprovfd as that the exceptional legislation regard to Ireland need not be long continued. Having inched on the suffering conse- quent on the fjgnlge of Ifldfe^ and other points in the Xoyd Bpeebh, tfc KtaVb Mat fhora wa* at last a prospect of the long-vexed question of Parlia- mentary Roform being brought to a conclusion, and said with rtgard to the intention of her M j^sty to issue a Commission to report on trades' UUIOLS, he observed it was no exaggeration to say there was uo freedom of trade without freedom of labour, and in the present condition of things the tradeof this country wss passing out of our h8..<1s In consequence of the mistaken notions of the artizan, and therefore remedial Iegi«iation was Iruperitavely called for. His lordship then briefly referred to the other points in the R< yal speech, and concluded by expressing the satisfaction of the House with the overwhelm^ g enthusiasm which greeted her Majesty's late visit to one of the great mining districts as an evidence of increasing loyal attachment to the Throne. H.R.H. the Prince of Wales here entered the House and took his seat. Lord Delamere. in seconding the Address, briefly glanced at the various subjects dealt with In the Sneech, and more particularly dwelt upon the Irish policy of the Government, which he cordially approved. The question of landlord and tenant was one of long standing, an t requiting immediate settlement, and it was one which could be very properly dealt with hy a Government whose head wall not only an Irish proprietor, but a landlord who ha ever been anxious for the welfare of his tenantry. After some remarks upon Traded Unions, the original objects of which he approved, but whose coercive operations he condemned, he proceeded to cor aider the subject of Reform. He thought that the people had spoken out decidedly upon the question, and he thought the time was favourable for the consideration of a Reform Bill. The extent of such a measure was a question for Iscusslon, but he believed that Parliament would sup- port the Government in carrying any well-considered scheme which proposed to extend the franchise to a degree com- Triemnra e with the Increased spread of education and poli- tical knowledge Earl Russell said no one could complain either of the brevity of the speech or of the variety of topics contained in It. The question of thrjlat^ war in Europe was adverted tn, and a hope was expressed that the termination of the late war mIght lead to the establishment of a durable peace. In the speech delivered at the close of last session her Majesty declared that she had not been an indifferent spectator of the war; but that she had not thought it expedient to take part in it, as neither the honour of the crown nor the interest of the British people were mixed up in tt. He entirely concurred in that view, but he was. afraid the spirit of aggression which of late years had animated some of the European powers, and espe- cially Prussia, might lead to future calamity. Referring to the question of reform, he said he trusted that a but would be introduced Into the other House without unnecessary delay, and that it would be of such a character as to enable the House to consider it with a real desire to settle the question. In consequence of the introduction into the bill of 1832 of the Chandos clause, which gave votes to the most dependent class that could be conceived, the question of reform had been since continually a subject of debate. He defended the bill of last session, which, he said, was de- feated by those who combined against it for factious pur- poses. II the bill promised by the government were a good bill he should give it his support, hut if it were a bad or a delu- sive measure he should oppose it. He cautioned the govern- ment not to attempt by a trick to deprive the artisans of the fair right they had to a share in the representation, or to give them less than they were entitled to. Most public meetings had declared for household suffrage, but parlia- ment was not likely to go so far. If they passed an unfair bill the people would say it was necessary to have a new government, a new House of Commons, and a new bill. The Eurl of Derby said he would relieve the noble earl's anxiety as to any attempt to delay the question of Reform by announcing that at the earliest possible day—probably Morniay next—it was the intention of the Chancellor of the Ercheq^r to lay on the table of the other house the pro- posals of the government. At the same time he wished to impress upon the noble earl that there was no hope of a satisfactory settlement of the question if it was to be taken up in the spirit and temper just manifested by him. If it were really desired to see a settlement of the question which, although not final, would render it Improbable that any agitation for a further mea- sure would occur for a considerable time, such a re- sult could not be attained by making it a question of party or political strife. They must be prepared to give and take, and to meet each other's views, for he was con- vinced that there was no government in the country which could, at the pret^t time, of itself carry a Reform Bill. With regard to tno relations of landlord and tel/ant ill Ireland, he said It was the wish of the government to give every facility to tenants to secure the value of their im- provements consistently with the rights of the landlord. The Address was then agreed to, and their lordships adjourned. In the House of Commons, at the evening sitting, the Speaker having read the Royal Speech, T,he Thomas de Grey ri»se to move an address in reply. The hon. member said—There were circumstances which required him to be particularly watchful in what he said, and tf he expressed anything distasteful to any section ot that House, he trusted it would be attributed to his youth and inexperience. Referring to the Speech, he commented on the nourishing state of trade at home and abroad, which he hoped was an augury that the peaceful statt of this country would be continued. But they must not forget that to preserve peace it was necessary that efficient arms should be put into the hands of our soldiers, and that the condition of the army should be as far as possible ameliorated. Tue past year had witnessed many changes In the map of Europe, and he trusted that the re-arrangement of Germany would produce a lasting peace. With reference to our re- lations with the United States, he trusted the suggestions made by her Majesty's Government would bs accepted in the same spirit in which they were made. It was satis- factory to know that her Majesty had directed efforts to be made with the view of effecting a reconciliation with reíe- rence to the Turkish subjects iu Crete, and it was to be hoped that the revolt would soon be terminated. A great famine had lately visited certain portions of India. There was no doubt that when further communication waa opened up, the people would be to a considerable ex- tent secured against the recurrence of such an event. Alluding to Fenianism, he remarked that the measures adopted last year had happily put an end to all apprehensions of a rebellion without shedding a single drop of blood; and, seeing that a bill was promised with reference to the tenure of land, there was a prospect of a better future for Ireland. Socgestlons had been made to the Government by the Royal Agricultural and other societies which would lead to the removal of those restric- tions which had lately been so beneficial to the country. The evils prevailing in the mercantile service were noticed in her Msj*sty's Speech. He admitted the importance of the subject, and thought that the condition of the men engaged in that service should be such as to increase instead of diminish their number. Flavins; glanced at the clause of the Speech relating So provision for the sick poor of the metropolis, he eametothitt which relared ¡ 0 th.. vexed question of Raform. In dealing witn this subject, he was of opinion that unless all parties were united, it was almost impossible that any measure was ever likely to be passtd in that House. In con- clusion. hf hoped the session would n jt be occupied in un- profitable discussion, but that the measurs promised by the Government would be allowed to be started and receive the candid considaratlon of the House. The hon. gentleman then read the Address in reply to the Royal Speech. 11 r. Graves seconded the motion, congratulating the Gov rrune'it on the exlen&ive prop,rcnime of important re- forms *mch they had m mitttid to the House. In adverting to the question of Parliamentary Reform, he admitted that a measure was a necessity, but sueigeited that as it had advanoa i but. Uttls In the h-inUs of pM-ty, the House should take the settlement of it into its own hands. Mr. Gladstone said he rose to support the Address. The three announcements of a measuie for the union of the North American provinces, of a measure on that most im- portant subject the state of the relations of landlord and tenant in Ireland, and the announcement, more gratifying than either, that in the judgment of the government the time had come when the necessity for the existence in Ireland of exceptional coercive legislation had ceased, were sufficient reamns tor adopting this course. He assured the govern- ment that the promised measures with regard to the army should receive careful consideration. The subject of the relations between masters and workmen was a most delicate and important one, but he thought there had been statements exaggerating the differences between work- men and their employers and he hoped that the forthcoming meaeure would be based' on the principle that masters and workmen alike had the right to sell their commodity, capital, or labour, on the best terms in their power, so long *? .t?ey those rights without prejudice to the rights of others. Oa the subject of reform, he said there was one branch of it that of proved corruption at electlous, which was a matter of national honour, and he expressed a hope that in the forthcoming measure they would give evidence of the sincerity of their desire to put down these practices. As regarded the general question of reform, the interests of the country demanded its speedy settlement, and it was the duty ot parliament to accept, wherever they couid get it, a measure which would be adequate to meet the just expectations of °i)"r!5r71 As regarded the substance of the measure, he think that a proper occasion to discuss It, but the suostance ot the measmre was hardly more imoortant than «f *eltl«ment of it. Inasmuch as until It was settled proceed *or the ordinary business of legislation to The Chancellor of the Exchequer expressed his gratification M, *Dnounoetuent that there was to be no amendment on £ ei?*i_ sta,ied that no measure on the subject of orioery had been prepared, because all the reports of the various commissions on the subject had not all been received; ne promhed papers on the Cretan Insurrection, and excused himself from going now into the question of Reform, as he intended on Monuay next to state the course which govern- ment intended to take on the subject. The address was then agreed to, and the House adjourned. In the House of Commons on Feb. 6, the Speaker took the chair at tweHe o'clock. Mr Kavanagh (the gentleman without legs or arms who was elected for the County of Wexford) took the oaths and U18 seat, Mr. Ayrton obtained leave to bring in a bill to appropriate a portion of the income of the estate lately belonging to the prebend of Finsbury in the cathedral of Saint Paul, London Siu of spiritual destitution in the metropolis The Hon. T. de Grey brought up the Address in answer to the Queen's Speech. On the motion that it be read a second time, Mr. Hadfleld regretted that no mention had been made in the Speech from the Throne of the much-vexed question of church rates which for more than thirty years had agitated the country' He moved as an amendment to the address, "That this House regrets that there has been no allusion in the Speech to the subject of church rates." Mr, Baines briefly seconded the amendment. The Speaker said hon. members were in order In express- ing their opinions upon any subject they chose, but they were not in order in moving amendments at this stage. The proper time for moving amendments was when the Address WM moved, Mr. Darby Griffith obtained leave to bring in a bill to enable shareholders of Joint-stock companies to vote by means of voting papers. In answer to Mr. Hibbert, Mr. Walpole said the Govern- ment intended to Introduce two bills with reference to capital punishment. In answer to Mr. Hadfleld, Mr. Walpole said the Govern- ment had no bill to introduce with reference to oaths and declarations. The House then adjourned. —^s——wmmmm

THE EXTRAORDINARY CHARGE OF…

THE TICHBORNE BARONETCY.

AN AMERICAN VENDETTA,

THE JAMAICA PROSECUTIONS.

STRANGE SCENE IN A THEATRE.

THE END OF THE MORMONS COMING.

A FEMALE " CAVALRYMAN!" j

A STRANGE DREAM.