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<®nr fratki Craesjjimlretii

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fratki Craesjjimlretii (Wedeemitright to state that we do BOt at tJ 'times IdentUg Igjpelves with our correspondent's opuuons.J A Session, which bids fair to be one of the most important we have had for many years, having com- menced, speculations are naturally rife as to the course which business will take and as to the legis- lative measures which we may expect. Now that the Queen's Speech has been circulated throughout the country, it may be well just to note down the par- liamentary measures that were rumoured just before the Session was inaugurated. It was then rumoured that we were to have measures for army reform, partly founded on the report of the Recruiting Commission Poor Law reform, evidently necessitated by recent facts and revelations; the amendment of the law of capital punishment; an amendment of the law of master and servant; an amendment of the law of bankruptcy; a modification of the merchant shipping law an alteration in the law of landlord and tenant in Ireland; an amendment of the law of joint-stock com- panies the extension of the Factories Acts to women and children in other employments; and bills to place the gas and water companies of the Metropolis under the control of the Metropolitan Board of Works. We now know perhaps a little better than a week ago, how many of these things we are likely not to have, and how far we shall once more have an illustration of the old axiom that those who expect least will be likely to be the least disappointed. It is to be hoped that the statement by a usually well-informed Irish journal is correct, that the Prince of Wales will have a residence in Ireland where he will pass a portion of each year. It is said that the present Ministry proposed this step to the Prince, and that he cheerfully acceded to it. His Royal Highness must, however, often have heard this proposition before, for it has been made often enough. A Royal residence in Ireland during a portion of the year would do much towards making the Irish generally as thoroughly loyal as the greater part of the nation now is. It would do something towards killing Fenianism by kindness. The Irish perhaps have some little cause for grumbling when they notice that though Her Majesty makes a long stay annually at Balmoral, no Royal visit is ever paid to the Emerald Isle. If the rumour be true that the Prince at once heartily acceded to the proposition made to him, this may be taken as another proof of his willingness to devote his large influence to the good of his country gene. rally. During the seclusion of her Majesty this five years past the Prince and Princess of Wales have done their uttermost to counteract the de- pression which has naturally arisen from that seclu- sion. They are now at Marlborough House, ready to assist ill the gaieties of the London-season, and we can scarcely take up a paper without noticing how hard the Prince works, and how much he does to aid all those objects that the nation has at heart. For instance, after having given twenty guineas towards establishing a central hall in connection with the Working Men's Club and Institute Union, he has now given another 25l.; he has given 20l. for a cup at the annual exhibition of the Norfolk Agricultural Society, at which he intends to be an exhibitor and competitor. Such acts as these are numerous, and it is no wonder, therefore, that his popularity daily in- creases. It should be added, however, that there are pleasing signs of the Queen coming more prominently among htr subjects than has been her wont. A Court will be held at Buckingham Palace on the 27th, and this, no doubt, will be followed by others. Pope tells us that Tig education forms the common mind; Just as the twig is bent the tree's inclined. I suppose, too, that education forms the Imperial mind; and if so the Prince Imperial will be a perfect prodigy of mental training. Every hour seems to be appor. tioned he has tutors for every possible branch of study, and his very recreations are regulated to such an extent that he would no doubt feel delighted to escape from tutorial trammels and wander about like a young Haroun Alraschid. Much of his instruction, however, must be of an agreeable character, his riding and fencing lessons to wit. There is always a great difficulty in ascertaining what really are the attainments of a Prince, but some of the accounts I have read, if true, show that the young Prince Imperial, who is not yet eleven years of age, has acquired the mastery over several—I am afraid to say how many—languages, and that his knowledge of the arts and sciences is by no means despicable. As the Prince of Wales is to go over to Paris to assist at the opening of the Exhibition, would it not be well for the Prince Imperial to come over here with the Empress, on a return visit ? There is so little reliance to be placed upon the weather that it does not do to rejoice too much when we see and feel the first gleams of a February sun, but they are deliciously cheering, nevertheless, especially after the the miseries of frost and thaw that we have so lately suffered. Cheering, too, it is to read, and to learn from private sources, that trade is reviving. The working classes have suffered immensely this winter, and the effects of want of employment still linger among them; but the revival of work out of doors is perceptible enough even to casual observers, and this naturally has its effect upon employment generally. It is rather remarkable how the first gleam of sunshine has set people talking of going to the Exhibition. Although it will not be open for two months, and although thousands who talk about going will not under any circumstances go for many months, people like to have the pleasures of antici- pation, and talk of it accordingly. There is every reason to believe that the rush of visitors will be some- thing enormous, but I do not anticipate that there will be much difficulty in the way of board and lodging. The fears on this head have been exaggerated by the alarming statements that have been spread abroad; but the fact appears to be that the Parisian hotel. keepers, lodging-house keepers, and restaurateurs have now learned that if there will be an immense demand there will be an immense supply, and that ridiculously high charges will be out of the question. As to the facilities for getting to Paris they will in all probability be very largely increased. It was at one time thought that the chief railways would raise their rates, but au cvntraire they are lowering them. The Northern of Trance Railway has reduced the fares between Calais and Paris by six francs, so that the journey via Dover and Calais (the short sea route) is only four francs dearer than via Folkestone and Boulogne; and it is stated that when the mails are carried between London and Paris by way of Dover, Calais, and Boulogne in March next, there will be one uniform fare on the French railway to Paris whether the traveller go either by Calais or Boulogne. The South.Eastern Railway haa announced special facilities for visitors to the Ex- hibition, and the London, Chatham and Dover will also do something in the same direction amongst these facilities being that the cargo boats will take third-class passengers. Apropos of visiting the Exhibition, there never perhaps was any- thing like the passion for learning French as has now suddenly manifested itself. Everybody—all the world and his wife and children—are goingr to Paris in the spring or summer, and everybody considers it necessary to be able to speak French; at least people are all of a sudden making violent efforts to learn it. The truth, however, is, that never was French less re- quired than it will be during the era of the Exhibition. But I should be sorry to say a word to discourage the desire to learn Freneh, not only because it is always nseful, but because this new-born desire may do some- thing towards benefiting a very deserving class of per. sons in this country—the teachers of French, many of whom have but a very sorry time of it. A controversy is now being carried on here in which I can scarcely expect those out of London to take much interest, but it nevertheless is of no little interest to all who are "long in populous city pent." Sir Thomas Maryon Wilson claims Hampstead Heath, and asserts his claims in the most practical way possible—by building on it selling gravel from it, and telling us that anybody who comes there may be prosecuted as a trespasser. and on the other hand there is a. defence fund being raised for the benefit of the public For myself I have little doubt that Sir Thomas is legally in the right and hence we have another illustration of the old adage that possession is nine points of the law But surely there is wealth in London to buy the Heath for London for ever. The easyway in which large sums are raised for any special object in London ought to be a caution," as Americans say. An appeal to the public generally would I believe, be most generously responded to, and thus Hampstead Heath, the beauty of which is 80 generally acknowledged, might be preserved to London for ever. Deputations, leading articles, and abuse let it come from whence it may, are of no use it is simply a question of money. There are every day, and all day, little crowds of people in Trafalgar.square, looking at and admiring Sir Edwin Landseer's lions. They have been very long coming (I think Sir Edwin received the order for them eight years ago) but they are well worth waiting for. The site in Europe" has nowfour magnificent lions, which transcend in grandeur anything of the kifidfa the world. Massive and ponderous, they are AMriertheleii beautiful in outline, and though the at- titude of all is alike, they naturally present a variety •f aspects, according to the point from which they are viewed. Coming up to see the lions will be no longer a joke. They are worth travelling many miles 0,

PASSING EVENTS, RUMOURS, &c.

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OPENINGOFPARLIAMENT.

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THE EXTRAORDINARY CHARGE OF…

THE TICHBORNE BARONETCY.

AN AMERICAN VENDETTA,

THE JAMAICA PROSECUTIONS.

STRANGE SCENE IN A THEATRE.

THE END OF THE MORMONS COMING.

A FEMALE " CAVALRYMAN!" j

A STRANGE DREAM.