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- POOR LAW GUARDIANS, ABERYSTWYTH.

ABERYSTWYTH TOWN COUNCIL.

PETTY SESSIONS, ABERYSTWYTH.

MR. BRIGHT AND HIS WORKPEOPLE

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MR. BRIGHT AND HIS WORKPEOPLE In proportion as a man becomes eminent he becomes a mark tor satire, abuse, and detrac- tion. The mediocre escape calumny, as they escape praise; the man of no ability and little influence, too, is beneath the shafts of ridicule, except, perhaps, from one or two out of his numerous companions; but the man of" mark and likelihood" is frequently a man who liter- ally becomes a mark. It has been so with Mr. Bright. He took so active a part in the repeal of the Corn Laws that he aroused the opposi- tion of the lauded gentry, and he has always been so consistent an advocate for the suffrage being given to the people, rather than to a class of them, that he has excited—we were about to say the hatred-but at all events, the deter- mined opposition of the Conservative and the privileged classes. But besides all this, there has been one great feature in Mr. Bright's career which has especially caused the frequent attacks upon him—his success. "There is nothing succeeds like success," it has been said and there is nothing that excites so much envy and opposition. It has been felt that by dama- ging such a man his cause would be damaged; that if his personal influence could be lowered the chances in favour of his political creed gaining ground would be lessened. The con- sequence hag been that attacks on him have been frequent, and have increased in bitterness in proportion to his increasing power over the working classes. We cannot wholly acquit those who have led these attacks, and having thus acted from personal animus to a certain extent, but still we are quite willing to believe that in many cases they have been rather thoughtlessly than wilfully made, while in many other cases those who made them may have believed in their truth. Under this view we cannot think that Mr. Bright's workpeople have acted wisely in so long deferring their testimonial in his favor. The alleged calumnies and slanders are not new the same things that have been said of Bright within the last fortnight have been said for years. Why, then, were they not contra- dicted before this? Surely much bitterness of controversy would thus have been spared. Nor can we wholly acquit Mr. Bright. He is not one of those who, as Pope says— Damn with faint praise, assent with civil leer, And, without sneering, teach the rest to sneer, Willing to wound, and yet afraid to strike, Just hint a fault and hesitate dislike. A more bold and outspoken man never stood upon a platform. Nor has he been sparing of his attacks on others. Lords and Commons, aristocracy and landowners. Conservatives and Whigs, have all come in for their share of— what shall we say—vituperation ? It is scarcely too strong a word. Honest as we believe Juhu Bright to be, he is nevertheless pugnacious and cantankerous. He never makes a speech with- out attacking some class or some individuals; and in the very speech in which he replied to his workmen, he gives an instance of it. Our assailants," lie said, "are the monopolists ol political power in this country, and the base creatures who, for selfish purposes, are found crawling about them. What is my crime? That I have resisted this monopoly uf power; therefore, I have been thus assailed." Stronger language against the whole of Mr. Bright's political opponents could scarcely have been used, and, like all unnecessarily strong lan- guage, it passes the boundaries of truth. It was doubtless hastily uttered, as many of the attacks on the speaker have been hastily written. On the whole, we are heartily glad that this meeting has been held, and only regret that it was not held Jong ago. For a time it may in some quarters exciteincreased bitterness against Mr. bright, but it cannot fail to remove all occasions for any future attacks of the same kind as those of which his workmen now ex- plain. A more complete denial of the principal charges against him could not he given; and we trust that in any future controversy, the political opponents of Mr. Bright will refrain from the aryumentum ad homiuern.

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