Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

43 articles on this Page

4Ðnr Irate Cormpraknt.

[No title]

PASSING EVENT*, RUMOURS, &o.

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

PICTURES OF MISERY!

"SENSATION" TRIALS IN AUSTRIA.

THE END OF "JENNY, THE CAT-SKINNER!"

ITHE BISHOP OF SALISBURY AND…

FENIAN DENUNCIATION OF HEAD…

[No title]

THE SUCCESSOR OP HIAD CENTRE…

THE ILLEGALITY of TRADES'…

HOW TO AVOID STRIKES.

A SERMON ON THE GOLDEN RULE…

A SHIP ON FIRE IN THE RIVER…

[No title]

A CHARGE OF PERJURY AGAINST…

A CHARMING CITY TO LIVE IN!

A FEARFUL STRUGGLE WITH A…

LETTING A FURNISHED HOUSE.

A FEARFUL DEATH!

RHYMES FOR REFORMERS.

SCOLDING FROM THE PULPIT.

AN EXTENSIVE BANK ROBBERY.

ACROBATS FROM JAPAN.

.HIS CAREER STOPPED!

A SHOCKING CASE-HEARTLESS…

MR. SAMUEL MORLEY AND HIS…

IN A FIX-AND KNOWING IT!

CHARGE OF EXTORTION AGAINST…

News
Cite
Share

CHARGE OF EXTORTION AGAINST ENGLISH PILOTS. The committee of the Maritime Insurance Board of Havre has drawn up a memorial, signed by shipowners, merchants, and captains of that port, and which, after expressing its admiration of the institutions in Eng- land for the saving of life from shipwreck, calls atten- tion to the oppressive nature of the exactions in that country for assistance to vessels at sea, which it de- dares are unworthy of a civilised country, and such as to suggest a comparison with the wreckers of the Bahama Islands. A pilot, for the simple exercise of an act of his calling, puts forward the most extortion- ate claims for salvage, and the proffered assistance of boatmen, fishermen, and steamers, is feared by the- captains of vessels almost as much as the rocks from which they are in danger. Thus, the aid which among navigators should be a duty of humanity and fraternity is in England frequently only an act of spoliation and pillage. The document adds that the French underwriters frequently decline to insure vessels trading between France and England, through fear of the rapacity of the pilots, boatmen, and others in that country. In France pilots are satisfied with their dues, and have only a claim to a third for the rescue of ships abandoned, while simple assistance is fre. quently given gatuitously at the most, the Tribunals of Commerce allow a moderate indemnity, which does not destroy the benefits of the assistance rendered.

DEPLORABLE ACCIDENT.

[No title]