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...... EXTRACTS FROM MR. BRIGHT'S…

. EXTRAORDINARY SUICIDE.

THE LOCK-OUT IN THE IRON TRADE

THE STOPPAGE OF ATTWOODS,

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----AN EXTRAORDINARY SPEECH…

THE EXECUTION OF CAPTAIN BEALL.

THE LATE DUKE DE MORNY,

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The obsequies of the Duke de Morny took place on Monday. By the Emperor's orders an unusual amount of magnificence was imparted to the cere- mony, and the large numbers of the public which as- sembled at various points upon the route taken by the procession added to the splendour and grandeur of the solemnity. At seven p.m. the first cannon was discharged from the Invalides, and a salvo was fired hourly until the procession started. The principal front of the Legislative Chamber was draped black, and silver candelabra were placed between the columns of the portico. The saloon of the Palace Guards was converted into a chapelle ardente. The body of M. de Morny was placed upon a cata- falque draped with silver cloth, under a canopy sup- potted by four columns enveloped in black. Two funeral altars were erected right and left. At the foot of the coffin a priest and a Sister of Charity knelt upon faldstools, praying. Two Zouaves of the Guard were stationed beside the catafalque. Under the portico of the Bourbon Palace and upon the front of the canopy overhanging the coffin, was to be seen the escutcheon of the De Morny family, at the foot of which was the motto, "Pro patria et Imperatore." The saloon called the saloon of the Emperor, pre* ceding the G uards' saloon, was entirely draped with black. At eleven a.m. tbe constituted authorities and functionaries invited to the ceremony arrived at the Legislative palace, and were assigned their various positions. At half-past eleven, the coffin containing the mortal remains of the President of the Corps Legislatif was taken down from the catafalque, and carried to the funeral car, waiting in front of the Palace Colonnade. The car was drawn by six horses, and the vehicle was of extreme magnificence. Figures of weeping angels were at the four corners, and a b^ack velvet cushion was placed upon the summit, bearing a ducal crown covered with crape. The coffin was enveloped in blaek cloth, richly or- namented with large plates of silver. The hat and sword of the deceased were placed upon it. Fourteen mourning coaches followed the funeral car. The procession at starting was preceded by detach- ments of the Garde de Paris, and a great body of cavalry and infantry and arrived at the Madeleine a little after noon. Immediately after the funeral car came three bearers in mourning cloaks carrying cushions, upon which were displayed the insignia orders, and decorations of the deceased. MM. Rouher' Minister of State, Troplong, President of the Senate', Schneider, Vice President of the Corps Legislatif, and Vuitry, Minister presiding over the State Council,'held the sttings of the pall. The facadc of the Madeleine was hung with black in the centre, and displayed the escutcheon of the de- ceased. The interior of the church was lined through- out with black cloth, upon which the letter M and the escutcheon of M. de Morny appeared at intervals. The altar was also completely draped with black, and in the centre of the church was a magnificent catafalque surrounded with columns sustaining a Greek dome. All persons furnished with tickets had taken their places by eleven o'clock. The funeral car arrived at a quarter to one. The clergy of the Madeleine came to receive the body at the door of the church, and the religious ceremonies at once commenced. High mass was chanted by M. Ie Cure, and the Archbishop of Paris pronounced the absolution. The ceremony terminated in an hour and a half, and the procession moved along the hDe of thq boulevards. It was headed by various detachments from varIOUS regiments, and the funeral car was followed by a cortege comprising the family of the deceased, deputations from the Department of the Puy de Dome, Chamber- lains representing the Emperor, the Ministers. Mem- bers of the privy Council, Marshals of France, Admirals, the Governor of the Invalides, the Chief Commandant of the National Guards of the Depart- ment of the Seine, the Senate. the Corps Legislatif, the Council of State, the Court of Cassation, the Cour des Comptes, and all the other public offices had their representatives. The procession passed along the whole line of the Boulevards as far as the Place de 130 Bastille, where it branched off in the direction of the cemetery of Pere- la-Chaise, along the Rue de la Roquette. The pro- cession arrived at the cemetery before three o'clock. Large crowds of people were present at all the points passed by the cortege, but everything passed off with the greatest order, and the weather was favourable for the ceremony. | Upon arriving at Pere-la-Chaise, the mortal remains of M. de Morny were deposited in a temporary vault and M. Schneider, the Vice-President of the Corps Legislatif, in the midst of the deepest silence, made a very affecting speech, after which, M. Rouher, Minister of State, advanced, and spoke as follows:- Gentlemen,—I have been asfed to say a few words over the tomb of the friend we deplore. It is wilh the greatest difficulty I am able to gather my recollections and collect my th< uahts. Forgive me. My heart is still affected by the painful spectacle I have had under my eyes during the last few hours, from the moment that icience declared i'.self powerless until that of the fital end. I have been the witness of that silent agitation, that sombre and dumb solemnity which precedes death I have seen De Moroy upon his conch calm, patient, resigned, stoical, without a murmur against his eru.-1 and premature end, detaching one by one his earthly affections, so as to I enter the less shackled into the bosom of God. He addressed to the agitated Emperor the touching farewells of a devoted frlt n d: he blessed with his hands his desolate poor young wife overcome by tears and despair, and his four little children whom tteirage saved from the sorrows of separa- tion. He called successively tc him his faithful friends to tell them his last wishes. Ihen he aeked the p'ous Arch- bishop of Paris to crown his life by the Christian'* death, and snbdued for some time the sufferings of his agony to receive the sublime consolations the priest gives in the name 01 the Divine principle of immortality. The speaker then briefly sketched the main incidents of the Duke de Morny's career, and concluded with the following apostrophe:— Mor.>y, our friend if you have preceded us to the tomb, the void your absence produces In our ranks could not diminish our confidence, and has only fortified our courage. We a'-e the jealous inheritors of your devotion, your will and yrur power: resolute labourers under the authority of the Prince who has initiated great things and great ideas, we shall continue our daily task. lhe, edifice is founded, and. notwithstanding fata passions, will remain the sacred deposit of the public liberties and of the dynasty daar to the country. The Emperor has surrounded you with the tenderest affection his son, that young prince whom ycu received in the name of the Corps Legislatif as a pledge of security and of the furure," will, when upon the throne, be the protector and friend of your children. A salvo of 15 guns concluded the ceremony.

EXTRAORDINARY SCENE.

THE REAL AND THE IDEAL!

EXTINCTION OF THE NATIONAL…

RAILWAY COMPENSATION FOR ,DAMAGES.

THE ENGLISHMAN IN THE FRENCH…

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A GOOD GENERAL.

TRAVIATA IN PARIS.

THE MARKETS,