Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

24 articles on this Page

...... EXTRACTS FROM MR. BRIGHT'S…

. EXTRAORDINARY SUICIDE.

THE LOCK-OUT IN THE IRON TRADE

THE STOPPAGE OF ATTWOODS,

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

----AN EXTRAORDINARY SPEECH…

THE EXECUTION OF CAPTAIN BEALL.

THE LATE DUKE DE MORNY,

News
Cite
Share

THE LATE DUKE DE MORNY, The death is announced of one of the best known of the schools men who have been brought into promi- nence_ in ^roPean affairs by the revival of the Napoleon y ^sty (pays a contemporary). Devoted to the person and the interests of the Emperor, the Duke de Morny, whose death is announced by telegram, was one of the few whom the confidence of Louis Napoleon summoned to prepare the Coup d'Etat, and from that tIme to the present his name has been constantly of both in politics and monetary en- terprise?. nown that by his undertakings in connection witb railways, canals, French and foreign mines, socie les o credit, and other commercial enter- prises, he amassed a gigantic fortune, while in political hfe he reached the hIgh office of President of the Legislative Assembly The deceased duke, who was u0f?i°n r. October, 1811, was regarded as the hair-brother of the present Emperor of tbe French, being the reputed son of Queen Hortense and the Count de Fiahault. He assumed the name of the Count de Morny, a. French Nobleman resident at the Isle of France (Mauritius), who is said to have received 800,000f. for adopting him as a son. He was educated under the care of his supposed grandmother, the ac- complished Madame de Fiahault, also known as Madame de Sauza,, from her second marriage with a Poruguese nobleman of that name, aud placed in the Institution Muron, where Edgar Ney was among his classmates. His proficiency in study was remarkable, and he was early introduced into society, where he wa" much noticed on account of his elegant and winning manners. It is related that on one occasion when he came to visit Talleyrand, witn whom he was a favourite, that diplomatist said to a high personage who came imme- diately after young Morny had withdrawn, Did you meet a little fellow holding the hand of M. de Fia- hault ?" Yes, Prince, on the staircase," was the reply. "Well," said Talleyrand,-remark wbat 1 say, that child will one day be minister, He attended one of the principal military academies of Paris during two years, and left It in 1832, with the rank of sub-lieutenant after which he was stationed for sometime at Fontaiuebieau, where he is said to have turned his attention to the study of metaphysics and theology, although he does not seem to have long con- tinued to cultivate those branches of knowledge. He served for tome time inA'gsna. where he was wounded, and was decorated with tne Urder of the Legion of Honour for having saved the lite IËt General Trtzel. Queen Hortense, on hM' dea n 1837, bequeathed to him an annuity of 40,000t. e made his dibut in the world of industry as a manufacturer of beetroot sugar in 1838. Previous tothe revolution 0f 1848 he was for nearly eight years a member of the Chamber of Depu- ties, and in 1849 be was elected to the Legislative Assembly but up to that time his influence in political life proceeded from his occasional ability in handling financial and industrial subjects, and chiefly from his reputation as a versatile, ikilfal, and frequently suc- cessful speculator. The advent of Louis Napoleon to the Presidency brought hiJ3 into prbminence. At the critical moment of the Coup d Etat he said to have displayed much audacity and cooln He passed the evening of the 1st of December at the Opera Comique and ona. lady asking him m his box what he would do if they swept away the Assembly, he replied, I would try to put myself by 8lde 0f the broom." The same day he gave tickets to his friends admit,itlff them to the sittings of the Legislature the next dav It is said, however, that in eulogizing M. de Thori«nv whom be was about to replace in a few hours' he allowed the expression to escape him, "He was a Erond Portfolio ot the Interior on the morning of the 2nd of December, and, as one of the new Minister?, signed the first proclamations. He countersigned ail lets and decrees which came more especially under the iuris- diction of his ministry. When more than 200 repre- ^Azv to nrott the Preaidfency of Benoit M^rnv took tb organize legal resistence, M. de Morny took the responsibility of the order which was thrNationafT °r that imPortanfc fraction of fA!d wisi^8embIy- He eairt at the *me that Swn courage!" SaVe the representatives from their inf^0nMitr^e,C1'rCu1ars signalized his short stay dVectinftKy ,Was 0De of the 4th of December, aries adhesi^ ef(:tsto require of all public function- ♦ he Grov*rT,r!!n ln writing to tbe great measure which l V'n entwen3 accomplishing. Another c fthe the e-nrl °tU^ce.^ to ^e extraordinary Commissioners 1852 a th .r tt^sion and on the 19th of January, eWf' i 1 circular was issued explaining the new meni° mechauism and the designs of the Grovern- rl >», l8,8 application of universal suffrage. Four later he left the Ministry, with Messrs. Fould, Magne, and Rouher, on account of the confiscation of the property of the Orleans family. Subsequently he a member of the Legislative body, and since ir e bas officiated as its President. and e tbe coronation of the Emperor Alex- aer Jl. &s the representative of the French Govern- ot, and was treated in Russia not merely as the ambassador, but as the private friend of the French emperor. In St. Petersburg he obtained the band of be young and wealthy Princess Troubetekoi, who had oeen brought up at the institution of the Imperial Hiaids of honour, and whom the Empress Dowager wished to place among the ladies of the reigning Em- press the latter, however, declined her services on account of her being too beautiful, but sent her as a Wedding present her portrait set with diamonds. The Carriage was celebrated February 19, 1857, at St. **etersburg: according to Greek and Catholic rites and the Count is said to have presented his bride with dia- monds to the value of 2,000,000 francs. He purchased al o, in the name of his wife, a fceigneurial estate of the SevLigkv family, about twelve miles from St. Peters- burg. The present Sir Robert Peel, in one of his numerous speeches to his constituents, describes the late duke as "a spick and span man of considerable aplomb, and who, by the way, is one of the greatest speculators in the world. The name of Duke de Morny has been long familiar to English ears, whether in or out of office, as connected with nearly every kind of commercial speculation which ha? been set on foot in his own country, including canals, railways, credit companies, mining enterprises, and other projects which had for their object the de- velopment of French commerce, trade, and progress. -that he was always scrupulous or always successful is more than we should like to afBrm and it must be owned, even by those who have least sympathy with the general outline of his career, that in some particulars be has been of service to France. The duke was also well known as a connoisseur of art, and he prided him- self upon the possession of a very fine collection of gems both ancient and modern.

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

EXTRAORDINARY SCENE.

THE REAL AND THE IDEAL!

EXTINCTION OF THE NATIONAL…

RAILWAY COMPENSATION FOR ,DAMAGES.

THE ENGLISHMAN IN THE FRENCH…

[No title]

A GOOD GENERAL.

TRAVIATA IN PARIS.

THE MARKETS,