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...... EXTRACTS FROM MR. BRIGHT'S…

. EXTRAORDINARY SUICIDE.

THE LOCK-OUT IN THE IRON TRADE

THE STOPPAGE OF ATTWOODS,

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----AN EXTRAORDINARY SPEECH…

THE EXECUTION OF CAPTAIN BEALL.

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THE EXECUTION OF CAPTAIN BEALL. The following account of the execution of Captain Beall is from the New York Tribune of the 2¡).h of February The execution of the sentence of death upon John Y. Beall, the rebel spy, recently convicted by court-martial, duly took place on Governor's Island yesterday, the 24th of February AUhoueh the sentence was not to be carried iiro effect uotii between the hours of 12 and 2 o clock p.Ir., the sightseers, who were so fortunate as to procure passes, began to arrive in large numbers at Governor s Island at an early hour in the morning, and there was also a considerable throng, an10ng whom were several hundreds of soldiers. As we entered the cell of the prisoner, in company with Marshall Murray, a Deputy Sheriff, and another gentleman, we were struck by his singularly cool and confident mien. He was sitting on a chair by a little table which stood in the middle of the cell, with the black cap of death already up. on his head. Saeing us enter, he immediately arose, and said to the Marshal— "I am at your servio9. You will oblige me by making this thing as short as possible." The Marshal, who had seen him frequently before, did can flrst recognize him, as the black lurnan-bke nigbt- &DD6»r« its ion* tas&eled overlap, somewhat altered his Soon as h«e' iIIe knew ,um to he the same, however, as Captain T* I?' and PRORNIsed to comply with his request, height a »i™ was a handsome man. Ab.iu* 5ft. 9 n. in moustache and^v'nCon,pactly bul,t form> ^ht beard and culture and intell. « hair' regular features indicative of eye—these were the nh, I™"6". an(1 a clear, brilliant grey Tber. was aiso a .i^uiarll^ manner of movement and • Tr i ? Murray to the door of his cell hi' Marshal guards, who were awaiting him towarda^hi3^^611 i I apartment, heedless of the curious gaze of the toots of loungers who had gathered to witness tbe scene i 8 erected on a pleasant little knoll of I ground which slopes gently to the waters of the bay on the extremity of the Narrows. The structure itself was simple enough. There was no drop but a chair was placed directly extremity of the Narrows. The structure itself was simple enough. There was no drop hut a chair was placed directly under the rop9, which ran through an apeture and along a groove ot series of pulleys in the beam above, the other end fa ling in o a rude box or shanty, where it had connexion with a heavy weight, oa which the severing of a subordinate line would bring the noose up with a swift jerk to the top of the gallows res. Fp and down in the interior of the inclosure containing the weight, paced the man whose busi- ness it was to cut the short line at the signal, and by the action of the falling weight run up the outer cord with its danglh g burden of flesh and blood. He was in fact the hangman of the occasion, a deserter long confined on the island, but who, we understand, was extemporised Into an executioner on the condition that thereafter his own past sms were to be forgiven. By noon there was a large crowd collected round this spot, viewing the structure with a morbid curiosity, and several platoons of troops were march- ing and counter-marching around it with a full band play- Ing at their head. Nearly all the press was represented and stood very near the scaffold. As the fatal hour drew near the crowd of spectators be- came so pressing that a guard was detailed which quickly drove them back, while the troops were formed in a hollow square around the gallows to keep ou'siders at a distance. Just about 1 o clock the guard, with the prisoner and the chaplain in their midst, came filing down the slope, and the crowd respectfully opened to let them through. The prisoner walked swiftly, and evidently without fear. His arms were pinioned by the elbows behind his baek, which induced a slight forward stoop as he walked, but there was something defiant and free in his gait and bparing. There was something gracefully romantic in his attire, especially in the short dark cloak which he wore, falling theatrically down to his waist and concealing the hempen twist round his neck, and even his black cap added to this dramatic effect, being rored up, turban-like, above his brows, the bacgy end falling on one side and fluttering in the fresh wind that blew in from the sea. It is said that the prisoner entertained, almost up to the hour immediately preceding his death, confident hopes that the execution would not be carried into effect. These hopes probably vanished before he started on his last brief journey to the gallows indeed they must have done so, for on the way he looked up, gazed steadily at the sun, which was shining in a clear blue sky and pouring a flood of efful- gence over his pathway to the grave, and said to the chap- lain, "How beautiful the sunlight is I never knewwhstits splendour was till now, when I look upon it for the last time." A rriving at the gallows, the prisoner threw a quick, curious glance upward, as though he had never seen the structure before, and quietly stepped forward under the rope, while the adjutant proceeded to read the various findings of the Court the order accompanying it, and the death sentence. While this was going on the quiet, almost cheerful courage of the prisoner won the respect of all who saw him. His demeanour was, however, anything but that of a hravo; it evinced a pure moral courage an intellectual contempt for death. His face was pale, but not sorrowful, and frequent smiles played across his lips as he listened to the reading of the different specifications of which he had been found guilty, and for which he was there to meet his death. Especially at the reading of that specification respecting the Lake Erie piracy, where he had placed the innocent passengers of the captured steamer under durance by force of arms, he almost laughed, as if the reading recalled some incident which had once particularly amused him. In all this carelessness, however, there was only contempt and hard hooti-nothing 11 fi,(i0n^r'on 'or the crimes which he had attempted, and nothing like a conviction of the fanaticism or spirit of re- venge which had impelled him. immediately after the reading of the sentence the prisoner stood up, and the noose round his neck was fastened to the suspended cord above, leaving a slack of abont two feet. He faced the sea On his rinht stood Marshal Murray, Major L/Ogsweli, and another rmcial. On his left stood the chaplain wno produced a copy of the Episcopal Liturgy, aud read the commendatory prayer therefrom in solemn tones, the prisoner bending his head reverently, and evidently listening with profound attention. At the conclusion of this cere- mony the Deputy-Marshal approached the prisoner, adjusted tnei ron', and asked him if he had an) thing to say. The prisoner replied, "Yes I protest aeainst the execution of tllis sentence, it is absolute murder—brutal murder! I die in the defence and service of my country." j eiore the cap was drawn over his eyes, on being asked if ne wisnefitosay anytning further, he said, "No; I beg you m, haste!' His last woros addressed to the hang- man sassistant were—" Give my body to my brotlu r-in-law, bequck an out it." The Signai was then given, the weight v pi0!/3"'tfle r°Pe was seen to spring high up, and i in. V.Was in eternity for his neck was immediately 0 probably died in a second. There was a e?™ f ,on of tbe leSs and all motion ceased. The TneTwdv wa^ P'ace 14 minutes past 1 o'clock precisely. 1 .fVutf. red to hang just 20 minutes It was then r uP°n examination the surgeon in attendance pr°^ "!iT o'!1e1ex'lnct It was then placed in the coffin aWfifv,n?,<rh^v, horne away, when the crowd dispersed. Alth g ere was a n tural itebng of commiseration for the you d respect for the valorous bearing of the pri- soner among the spectators, the general and profounder sentiment was that he richly deserved the death he received. A fe"Y' days before his death the prisoner wrote a sketch of ?'>n« nJIT t*le early morning preceding his execu- of°himself re(luest hr.d a photographic likeness taken

THE LATE DUKE DE MORNY,

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EXTRAORDINARY SCENE.

THE REAL AND THE IDEAL!

EXTINCTION OF THE NATIONAL…

RAILWAY COMPENSATION FOR ,DAMAGES.

THE ENGLISHMAN IN THE FRENCH…

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A GOOD GENERAL.

TRAVIATA IN PARIS.

THE MARKETS,