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THE GREAT BURGLARIES IN LONDON.

--MUNIFICENCE OF MR. GUINNESS.

FORMIC :T IT- TSLIIG::NCE,

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A DESCRIPTION OF CARDINAL…

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THE ERUPTION OF MOUNT ETNA.

THE PRINCE OF WALES AT A LONDON…

A LETTER FROM BEFORE RICHMOND.

THE MINISTERIAL BAL MASQUE…

THE OLD LADY THAT WAS FOND…

MAY THE PARISIANS KEEP TO'…

LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES ON HIGHWAYS.

AN INDEPENDENT MINISTER ON…

--THE LAW OF LIBEL.

ANOTHER DEFEAT OF THE DAVEN-On…

f-T A LADY IN TOO HIGH SPIRITS.

A WONDERFUL GENERAL!

HOW IT STRIKES A STRANGER.

A SIMILE.

llkdtams feroral fltfes.

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llkdtams feroral fltfes. A NJow MILITARY COTILLON.— At the last ball given by the French Minister of War a new cotillion which was introduced i" described as ex. ceedingly original, and it has already become the rage in garrison towns in France. After the closing galop the dancers assemble in a close column and promenade the ball-room many times with military steps, whilst an obligato charivari is played on drums, tambourines, and mirlitons. At the head of the column strides a drum-major, who is chosen for his height and martial demeanour. U ^ARILOW ESCAPE —On the principle that who keeps fat oxen should himself be fat," it may shnnu8 that who deals in ships himself known events. Mr. Roberts, the well- natfnl n shipbroker, found swimming a very "R incr tbJr* a day or two ago at Glasgow. Being there to bid for a Bhip at an auction, he paid a ™ e i e.?e which had twelve feet of water in the hold, and, the weather being frosty, he slipped off a beam into the gulf beneath. There was not a soul on board besides himself, and all appearance there was no means of getting out of the hold. Fortunately there were some pieces of timber floating about, and of ( these Mr. Roberts, being a good swimmer, constructed a rude raft, upon which he managed to keep afloat uutil other people, bound on the same errand aa him- self, paid a visit to the vessel. But for his ability to swim, his disappearance would have been a complete mystery, the probability being that the vessel will lie, as she now lies, many months. A SUPPLY OF COAL.—An Illinois orator says the coal fields of that State are more extensive than any other on the globe. Of the 57,000 square miles of our territory 3 >,000 were underlaid with coal of an average thickness of six feet, and computed to be worth 500 billions of dollars a sum compared with which all the debts of the world are but pocket change. He thought the coal of Illinois equal to 1,10 cubic miles. It would last, with the increased consumption consequent upon. increased manufactures, railroad?, &c., 500,000 years. He thought the coal fields gave us some indication as to how long the world would last. If a man built a house and placed within it provisions and fuel for ten years, it was a pretty good indication that he expected to live in it that length of time. LIEUTENANT BURLEY, THE ST. ALBAN'SRAIDER. —Bsnnett Burley, the St. Alban's raider, is a native of this place (says the Glasgow Citizen). His father, Mr. Robert Burley, was a joiner in Messrs. Steele's shipbuilding yard, Greenock, 25 years ago, and was one of the promoters of the Mechanics' Institution. Mr. Burley. sen., still carries on business on his own account at Tradeston, Glasgow, and is well known in the trade as a c'ever and ingenious workman, and works a patent of his own for oval-turning and making hammer-shafts. He has also lately invented an im- proved process of destroying vessels in naval warfare, by means of submerged guns or torpedoes. Mr. Burley brought his invention before the naval authorities in this country, but, as is usually the case in such mat- ters. got no encouragement. Young Burley was quite familiar with his father's invention, and was anxious to see it turned to account. Being of an adventurous turn of mind, he left Glasgow during the iate war in Italy, with the intention of joining Garibaldi, but was too late. He then found his way to New York, where he was for some time attached to one of the daily newspapers next he was connected with a news- paper in the South. He communicated the torpedo scheme to Jefferson Davis, and obtained a commission to superintend a party engaged in laying down these destructive engines. He is about 24 years of age, and a powerful dashing fellow, of great energy and deter- mination of character. A "WOMAN'S LAW.—At the Salisbury Comity Court the other day an agricultural labourer brought an action againgst his employer to recover a large sum for wages due to him. The defendant, no doubt, being convinced that the grey mare is the better horse," sent his wife to defend the action, and she urged as a reason for not paying the plaintiff his wages that he lefthia work before the week was out, adding that if a person began a week and left in the middle of it he forfeited all the money that was due to him, even if it was a twelvemonth's wages. The lady clinched litp- statement to the plaintiff by saying I hat's law." The incident created some amusement in the court, and the lady found to her cost that her reading of Blackstone was not very profound. RATBEt EXPENSIVE Accordina to the Shefield Telegraph, the Commission now sitting to adjust the claims against the Water Company o that town for injuries arising out of the late disastrous in- undation will be a costly piece of business. From minute calculations made by the leading men on both sides, it is said there can be no doubt that the expenses ofioveetigatioa alone, without taking into account the immense amount awarded to sufferers, will prove to be at least a guinea a minute during every baur the Com- missioners shall have sat. Seeing that the Commission has sat many weeks already, and to all appearance is likely to sit many more weeks, the total cost of It. we should think, would make a handsome fortune for a Prince. RESPONSIBILITY OF RAILWAY COMPANIES—The Carlisle Assizes were brought to a close on Saturday by the trial of an action for 181. 10s. claimed by a farmer from the North British Railway Company, in consequence of his stacks being set on fire by the sparks from one of their locomotives. The evidence as to the engine having set the stacks on fire seemed clear enough, and the question was as to whether the engine was properly fitted up with the wire gauze over the funnel, and the usual precaution against the emission of sparks. The defendants admitted the absence of the wire gauze, which they alleged to be useless, and contended that in other respects the engine was of the best modern construction. His lordship. Mr. Justice Shee, in summing up, told the jury that the defendants were authorised to run their trains, and were not liable for a fire if they adopted the best known appliances to prevent sparks flying. Had they done so, was the question for the jury to decide. The jury found for the amount claimed by the plaintiff. DISCOVERY OF ANCIENT PAPER.—We ("Birming- ham Post ") understand that some very early speci- mens of paper have been recently discovered by oui valued correspondent. Mr. Toulmin Smith. We have not yet learned the full details, but we believe that in examining some writs to sheriffs of various countries, bearing dates at the end of the fourteenth century, Mr. Smith found that they were written on paper, and not on parchment as usual. K 0 paper mill seems to have been established in England before the end of the sixteenth century, and, whether of English or oreiijn manufacture, this recently discovered paper s very curious, and still more so if it proves to be English made, and probably more than a century older than any previously known. The discovery has excited much interest in the Record Office, and we hope to re- ceive some further details in the course of a few days, and content ourselves for the present with this first and brief announcement of the facts.

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